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124 Cards in this Set

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COLEOPTERA
CICINDELIDAE (Tiger Beetle)
- Antannae- long and curves back; head wider than thorax
- Active, fast-running, fast-flying
- Occur in bright sunlight, open sandy areas, on sandy beaches
- body shape parallel sided
- may bite hard
-brownish, black, or green
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
CARABIDAE (Ground Beetle)-
- head is narrower than thorax; antannae between eyes and base on mandible, ridges on back
- common, found on ground, beneath obects
- run rapidly, seldomly fly
- predators
- beneficial; gives off smell when handled
- generally black and shiny (sometimes brightly colored)
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
DYTISCIDAE (Predaceous Diving Beetle)
- abundant in ponds, lakes, and streams
- excellent swimmers, move hind legs in unison when swimming
- frequently fly to lights
- adults and larvae feed on various small aquatic animals including fish
- larvae is called "water tigers," sicklelike jaws
- oval, flattened, and fringed with hairs
- black brown or yellowish often with bright markings
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
GYRINIDAE (Whirlygig Beetle)
- oval
- two pairs of compound eyes, allows them to look for enemies
- very short hind legs
- short and stubbed antannae
- usually seen swimming in groups in a gyrating fashion on the surface of ponds and streams
- swim rapidly and well both above and below water
- some adults when handled give off a scent like that of a pineapple
- black, rarely metallic green
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
HYDROPHILIDAE (Water Scavenger Beetle)
- breathe oxygen while underwater from a stored air bubble under the elytra that is periodically renewed by surfacing
- short clubbed antannae
- what appear to be long slender antannae are actually long elongated mouthparts (palpe)
- eggs are usually laid singly on water plants or carried by mother until they hatch
- some species weave a silk envelop for a packet of eggs
- adults feed on rotting plant material, fungi, and dung. Some are predators.
- larvae is mainly carniverous, preying on snails and other easily captured victims. Are very voracious.
- black, brown, or yellow, sometimes patterned
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
HISTERIDAE (Hister Beetles)
- antannae elbowed and clubbed
- oval bodied
- exposing 1 or 2 abdominal sections
- like to eat dung and sap
- feeds on other insects attracted to dung or sap
-hard-bodied
-shiny black (Some with red markings)
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
SILPHIDAE (Carrion Beetle)
- "carrion" means dead meat
- front wing broadens towards tail or shows 1-3 parts
- black, usually with yellow, orange, and red markings
- clubbed antannae
- commonly found on carrion and decay vegetation
- front wings nearly cover abdomen
- buries dead animals (sexton)
-front wing short, exposing 1-3 abdominal segments
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
LUCANIDAE (Stag Beetle)-
- elongated-robust
- madible-like jaws (males large, females small)
- big
- antannae elbowed, 3 or 4 segments
- segments of dub being help together in a tight ball
- black to reddish brown
- most adults adults feed on sap flowers, larvae live in decaying legs and stumpings, apprarently feeding on the joices of rotting wood
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
PASSALIDAE (Bess Beetles)
- horns directed forward
- longitudinal lines
- segments not of club not capable of being held together in a tight ball
- colonies are formed in well-decayed logs or stumps
-shiny black with short horn bent forward on top of the head
- Only one species here in the US, rest in tropics
- larvae of tropical species used as food by certain natives
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
SCARABAEIDAE (Scarab/Dung Beetle)-
- includes dung beetles and june beetles
- white grubs eating at lawn (feed on roots of plants)
- rolls dung, area for eggs, created food for grub larvae
- oval, elongate, stout, able-bodied
- lamellate antannae (3 parts)
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
BUPRESTIDAE (Metallic Wood-Boring Beetles)-
- striking metallic colors
- thick forewings are corrugated (kinky), head is deeply inserted into the first thoratic segment
- many are forest dwellers, can be seen visiting flowers to feed on pollen and nectar
- attacks plants, pest species
-larvae bore under bark, and roots of trees. Called flat-headed borers
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
ELATERIDAE (Click Beetle)-
- brown or black
- named for their ability to click and jump
- when put on back, it will jump into the air until it is righted
- prosternum with an elongated lobe extends prosteriarly into a mesosternae depression; this feature, plus a loose articulation of the prothorax enables these beetles to "click"
- adults occur on foliage and flowers, under bark or in rotting woodl many don't feed
- larvae (wireworms) usually feed on roots and seeds
- some are injurious to agricultural crops
IMAGE
COLEOPTREA
LAMPYRIDAE (Firefly)-
- head covered with a shield called a protonotum
- brown or black, frequently with yellow or orange
- luminous
- both sexes light up
- different species have different rhythms
- sometimes mimicing occurs, and then eat the other species
- feed on various invertebrates, including snails
- larvae live on the ground, under bark, in moist swampy places
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
CANTHARIDAE (Soldier beetles)-
- long and skinny
- head is not covered by protonotum
- soft bodied
- black or brown, with yellow or orange
- found on flowers or foliage
- feed on pollen or nectar
- similiar to lightning bugs
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
LYCIDAE (Net-winged beetles)-
- soft body
- head concealed from above
- usually yellow to red, with black markings
- live on flowers, vegetation, foliage of trees, and shrubs
- adults feed on plant juices and other insects
- larvae are predacious and live under bark
- flat broad flexible wings
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
CLERIDAE (Checkered beetle)-
- elongated, almost cylindrical; covered with a dense coat of short hairs
- thoracic segment is long at the front and short at rear
- clublike antannae
- patterns of often bright contrasting colors; forewings may be checkered
- some go to flowers where sap is flowing and search for insects in the sap and soil
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
COCCINELLIDA (Ladybugs)-
- short and clubbed antannae, three to six segments
- shape often distinctive
- some have been used to combat scaled orchard pests
-torsal claws toothed
-head generally concealed by protonotum
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
TENEBRIONIDAE (Darkling Beetle)-
- found under rocks and barks of trees
- nocturnal
- feed on dead plants, green plants, and fungi
- gather stuff dropped by ants near ant hills
- stand almost on head when alarmed
- mostly unable to fly
- hindwings are either poorly developed or absent
- malodorous
- larvae are meal worms
-some "play possum"
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
MELOIDAE (Blister Beetle)-
- head is wider than protonotum
- occur in flowers and foliage
- body contains cantharidin, an irritant that causes painful blistering (even after death), cantharidin can be extracted for medicinal purposes
- feed on plants and can be pests
- larvae are parasitic, feed on grasshopper eggs and sometimes bees
- may completely defoliate a plant
- pests of potatoes, tomatoes, beans, cotton and other crop plants
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
CERAMBYCIDAE (Long-horned Beetle)-
- long antannae, usually longer than body, usually rise
- notched eyes
- many attractive colors
- larvae mostly feed on solid tissue of dead or dying plants, in trunks of fallen or cut trees
- many species are very destructive to trees and cut logs
- body elongate, usually cylindrical
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
CHRYSOMELIDAE (Leaf Beetles)-
- head is small, sometimes is concealed beneath the forward projecting first thoracic segment
- mouth parts are on the underside of the body
- 11 segments antannae are short and thread-like, slightly broadened at the tips
- legs are short, have muscles for jumping
- eggs may be laid in or on in th the good, plants, or debris around them
- some feed on aquatic plants
- economically destructive
- feed upon roots, spread fungus and disease
-Best known species: Colorado Potato Beetle
-generally oval
IMAGE
COLEOPTERA
CURCULIONIDAE (Weevils)-
- have snouts
- elbowed shaped antannae, clubs at end of antannae
- pests of cultivated plants, fruits, nuts, etc.
- play dead when disturbed
IMAGE
HOMOPTERA
CICADIDAE (cicadas)
- Most are large, blackish
- Only males produce sounds
-Some live 2-5 years.
-Periodical cicadas live 13-17 years
- wing veins reddish
-17 year cicadas are northern, often have greenish markings
IMAGE
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae (Rove Beetles)
- long, shiny
- threadlike antennae
-front wing short
-found on carrion, on the ground, or under objects
- some larger species bite
IMAGE
Diptera
Tipulidae (crane flies)
- Mosquito like
- Have very long legs
- Brownish or gray.
-few have dark markings
-they do not bite
-long narrow wings
IMAGE
Diptera
Culicidae (mosquitoes)
-vector of diseases (malaria, yellow fever)
-wings long narrow with scales along veins and wing margin
-Antennae in males very plumose (hairy)
- Females have few short hairs
- Larvae aquatic. Breathe at the surface, some have a breathing tube at the end of the body
- active at night/dawn/dusk
-Only the females bite
IMAGE
Diptera
Chironomidae (midges)
- very similar to mosquitos, often mistaken for them
- they do not bite
- hold their wings at side when at rest
- antanne in males are feathery
IMAGE
Diptera
Simuliidae (black flies)
- black
- rather squat
- large rounded wings
IMAGE
Diptera
Stratiomyidae (Soldier Flies)
- third segment of antennae rounded or elongate
- wasp like (Batesian Mimicry)
- browinish or metallie blue-black
IMAGE
Diptera
Tabanidae (horse flies/deer flies)
-Stout bodied
-medium sized to large
-Females bloodsucking
-eyes meets dorsally in males
-eyes seperate in females
-Eyes are brightly colored in many species
-Black or brownish
IMAGE
Diptera
Asilidae (robber flies)
- Top of the head hollowed out between eyes
-Hairy or nearly bare
-face usually "bearded"
- legs and thorax large
- Some resembles bumblebees while some resemble damsel flies
IMAGE
Diptera
Bombyliidae (bee flies)
-stout bodied and hairy
- medium to large
-wings at rest are held outstretched
-some have patterned wings
IMAGE
Diptera
Syrphidae (flower flies)
- yellow, brown, or black
- bare species strongly resemble wasps
- Hairy species resembles bees
- Do not bite or sting
- Important pollinators
IMAGE
Diptera
Tephritidae (Fruit Fly)
- often brightly colored
- wings usually spotted or banded
- larvae called maggots
IMAGE
Diptera
Drosophilidae (pomace flies)
- yellowish or browinish
-arista plumose
-found around fruit left out in the kitchen
- used in genetics research
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
SESIIDAE (Clear Winged Moths)
- narrow, partly transparent wings, dark bodies banded with yellow or red, fringes of hair on the legs
- antennae taper and bear tuft of bristles at the tip
- mimicry of wasps
- adults visit flowers; caterpillars bore into the stems, roots, and bark of treees
- fomerly called the Aegeriidae family
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
TORTICIDAE (Tortricid Moths)-
- small, mottled brown, tan, yellow-grey, or black and white
- square tipped fore wings, shaped like a shield when folded
- caterpillars live in rolled leaves held together with silk or bore into foliage
- adults do not feed
- called "millers"
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
HESPERIIDAE (Skippers)-
- characteristics of both butterflies and moths
- large heads, thickset bodies, short wings
- antennae are set far apart and end in a small hook
- hold wings at a 45 degree angle and hind wings horizontal while at rest
- sip nectar or extract organic nutrients from decaying matter
-
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
PAPILIONIDAE (Swallowtails)-
- adult form
- long "tails" projecting from hind wings
- boldly patterened in black, yellow, or white; often have spots
- front legs are fully developed in both genders
- "papillon" means butterfly in French
- most wings of some are tailed
- Give out a strong odor
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
PAPILIONIDAE (Swallowtails)-
- larvae form
- Y-shaped retractile organ called an "osmeterium" on top of the thorax, which gives off a foul-smelling odor
- feed on foliage of trees
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
PIERIDAE (Whites/Sulfurs)-
- white, yellow, or orange
- rounded eings and simple wing patterns which often consist of a narrow black border
- antennae end in a distinct club
- full-sized fore legs used for walking
- found in open, sunny places
- Larvae smooth, green, slender, not very hairy
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
LYCAENIDAE (Hairstreaks/Blues)-
- brillant blue, violet, or coppery wings, sometimes with tiny tail-like projections from the margins of the hind wings
- adults visit flowers
- small size
- females have normal forelegs, males have smaller ones which lack claws
-
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
DANAIDAE (Milkweed Butterflies)-
- usually orange or brown with black or white speckles
- toxic to predators
- bold patterns on both caterpillars and adults
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
NYMPHALIDAE (Brush-footed)-
- large variations on size and color
- covered with long, hairy scales and short forelegs
- antennae are scaled, often strongly clubbed
- larvae have branching spines
IMAGE
Diptera
Muscidae (House Fly)
- Parallel sided or narrowed distally
- Common Pests
- short fleshy proboscis
- larva breeds in filth
- spread disease
- adults feed by lapping up liquids
IMAGE
DIPTERA
HIPPOBOSCIDAE (Louse Fly)-
- leathery, flattened
- parasites
- occur on species
- wingless
- suck blood
IMAGE
Diptera
Calliphoridae (blow fly larvae)
- scavengers
- lives in dung, carrion, and similar materials
IMAGE
DIPTERA
CALLIPHORIDAE (Blow Fly)
- often metallic
- row of stout bristles on either side of the the thorax
- feathery tip of antanne
- metallic green or blue
IMAGE
Diptera
Tachinidae (tachinid flies)
- Some hairy or bee-like
- Most look like house flies
- larvae are parasites
- bristle like tip of the antanne is bare
IMAGE
TRICHOPTERA-
- resemble moths
- minute hair on wings
- long and slender legs with spurs
- long, multisegmented antennae
- wings are held rooflike over body at rest
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
SATYRIDAE (Satyrs, Nymphs, Artics)-
- dull, brown, or tawny
- one or more eyespot on each wing
- adults seldom visit flowers
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
PYRALIDAE (Pyralid Moths)-
- small to medium sized
- long palps which form a snout like projection from the head
- larvae feed on foliage and plant debris
- some are aquatic
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
SATURNIIDAE (Giant Silkworm Moth)-
- largest moths
- wings usually with eyespots
- featherlike antennae
- brightly colored
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
SATURNIIDAE (Giant Silkworm)-
- larvae form
- green
- large spines
- fat
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
SPHINGIDAE (Sphinx Moth)-
- larva
- fat
- soft spinlike processs
- "hornworm"
IMAGE
LEPIDOPTERA
SPHINGIDAE (Sphinx Moth)-
- also known as a "Hawk Moth"
- medium to large in size
- wings are relatively small
- antennae are thick and somewhat spindle shaped
IMAGE
Mecoptera
Boridae (snow scorpionflies)
- long antanne
- fairly long slender legs
- prolonged face that ends in biting jaws
- wings reduced or absent
IMAGE
Mecoptera
Panorpidae (Common Scorpionflies)
- male gentalia looks like scorpion's tail
- slender bodied
- brownish insects
- long threadlike antanne
- feeds on dead and dying insects, nectar, and rotting fruit
IMAGE
Siphonaptera (Fleas)
- brown to black
- adult thin flat body
-parasite
- Caused Bubonic Plague
- wingless
-ectoparasites
- usually jumping
IMAGE
ODONATA
AESHNIDAE (Darners)
- mostly large
- strong flying dragonflies
- patrol margins of ponds, lakes, and marshes
- blue or green
- compound eyes in contact on dorsal (upper) side of head
IMAGE
ODONATA
LIBELLUIDAE (Skimmer)
- Can be seen around ponds and marshes
- Many brightly colored
- Dragonflies hold their wings out flat when resting
- wings are wider than body is long
- many have spots ot bands on wings
IMAGE
ODONATA
COENAGRIONIDAE (Narrow-Winged, Damsel Flies)
- Hold their wings behind their back at rest.
- Most familiar species "Bluet"
- Front wing and hind wing alike in size and shape
- very slender abdomen
IMAGE
ODONATA
LESTIDAE (Spread-Winged)
- slender and long
- clear wings narrow at stalks at the base
- named for how their wings are diverged at rest
IMAGE
HOMOPTERA
MEMBRACIDAE (Tree hoppers)
- Jumping insects
- Vary in shape
- some appear humpbacked while some look like thorns
- Most species feed on trees and shrubs while others feeds on weeds and grasses
IMAGE
HOMOPTERA
CERCOPIDAE (froghoppers/spittlebugs)
- Adults called Froghoppers
- Larvae called spittlebugs
- small to medium sized
IMAGE
HOMOPTERA
CICADELLIDAE (Leaf Hopper)
- body is usually parallel sided
- sucking mouthparts
- brightly colored-
- thickened part of the antennae very short and ending with a bristle
- two simple eyes
- base of middle legs close together where they originate under the thorax
- second largest family in the Hemiptera
- pests of plants
- discharge a clear honey-like liquid through their anus which attracts ants
IMAGE
HOMOPTERA
FULGORIDAE(Fulgorid planthoppers)

- wedge shaped
- blunt hornlike projection on head
- antanne short
IMAGE
ODONATA
GOMPHIDAE (Clubtails)
-Compound eyes don't meet on dorsal side of head.
-Abdomen tip is clubbed shaped
- Dark brown, w/ yellowish or green markings.
- fly without hovering
IMAGE
PLECOPTERA (Stoneflies)
- antanne long thread like
- flattaned soft bodied
- chewing mouthparts
IMAGE
HOMOPTERA
APHIDAE (Aphids)
- pear shaped. Wings at rest usually held vertical above body
- some winged, some wingless
- pests of plants
- females give birth to babies (instead of eggs)
- release honeydew from their anus
- some live closly associated with ants
IMAGE
HOMOPTERA
DACTYLOPIIDAE (Scale)
- females flattened and oval
- body hard, smooth or covered with wax
- antanne reduced or absent
- legs may be present or absent
IMAGE
THYSANOPTERA (Thrips)
- Mouthparts rasping or sucking
- Intermediate between complete and incomplete
- Pale to blackish
- Anteanne short
- wings long and narrow
- Wings frigned
IMAGE
MEGALOPTERA (Dobsonflies)
- only 20 species in America
- densly veined wings
- lack forking veins like Neuoptera
- large hing wings
IMAGE
ISOPTERA (Termites)
-Small
-sofe-bodied
-pale colored
- soldiers have huge heads
- antanne short
-winged or wingless
IMAGE
MANTODEA (mantis)
- Antanne short
- Fron femora and tibiae armed with spines and fitted for catching prey
- Predacious
- middle and hind legs slender
-prothorax lengthed
IMAGE
BLATTODEA (Roaches)
-Body flattened
- head concealed from above by protonotum
- wings usually present
- antanne long and slender
IMAGE
GRYLLOBLATTODEA (Ice Insects)
- slightly resembles crickets and roaches (makes the family name)
- small
- wingless
- brown to black
- primitive
IMAGE
Dermaptera (earwigs)
- incomplete metamorphsis
- pincer like appendages at end of abdomen
- flattened bodied
- antanne threadlike
IMAGE
PHASMATODEA (Walking Sticks)
- body and legs very long and slender
- wingless
-look like twigs
- antanne long and slender
IMAGE
MALLOPHAGA (Chewing Lice)
- Small
- wingless
- flattened ectoparasites
- mandible jaws
- antanne short
- short legs
IMAGE
PROTURA
- sucking mouthparts
- Incomplete metamorphosis
- whitish
- lack eyes, wings, and antanne
IMAGE
COLLEMBOLA
- springtails
- no wings
chewing mouthparts
- minute
- antanne short
- furcula
IMAGE
THYSANURA (silverfish)
- 2-3 tail like appendages at the end of abdomen
- Long antanne
- elongate body
- chewing mouthparts
IMAGE
EPHEMEROPTERA (Mayflies)
- live only for a day
- dies after mating
- forwings triangular
- 2-3 hairlike tails
IMAGE
ANOPLURA (Sucking Lice)
- small
-flattened
- wingless
- ecto parasites
IMAGE
ORTHOPTERA
ACRIDIDAE (short horned grasshoppers)
- antanne short
- face vertical
- large hind legs
IMAGE
ORTHOPTERA
TETTIGONIDAE (short horned grasshoppers/katydids)
- large hind legs
- greenish or brownish
- long antanne
IMAGE
ORTHOPTERA
GRYLLIDAE (Tree Cricket)
- flattened
- wings of females thickened and feathery
- males produce sounds
- long hind legs
IMAGE
ORTHOPTERA
GRYLLOTALPIDAE (Mole Cricket)
- brownish
- body elongate
- spadelike front legs
IMAGE
ORTHOPTERA
TETRIGIDAE (Pygmy Grasshoppers)
- protonotum extends far back over the abdomen and tapers to a point
- females larger and heavier than males
- feed on algae
IMAGE
ORTHOPTERA
Gryllacrididae (camel crickets)
- brownish
- humped
- long antanne
- most males do not produce sounds
IMAGE
STREPSIPTERA
(Twisted-Winged Parasite)
- minute
- seldom more than 1/8" long
- parasites with wings
- males look like flies, but have no useful mouthparts
- attacks other insects
- forked or comblike antanne
IMAGE
NEUROPTERA
CHRYSOPIDAE (Green Lacewings)
- wings greenish
- eyes golden or coppercolored
- adults and larvae feed on aphids
- gives off umpleasent odor when handled
IMAGE
NEUOPTERA
MYRMELEONTIDAE (antlion: larvae)
- knobbed antanne
- eat ants and other insects
- live at the bottom of a conical pit in dry sandy or dusty areas
- sickle like jaws
IMAGE
NEUROPTERA
MYRMELEONTIDAE (Antlions: adult)
- Feed on nectar
- resembles damselfies
- poor fliers
- longer clubbed antanne
- soft elongate bodies
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
CORIXIDAE (Water boatman)
- dorsal surface of body flattened
- narrow dark crosslines
- front legs short
- hind legs elongate
- swim rightside up
- do not bite
- seen swimming in shallow ponds
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
NOTONECTIDAE (Back Swimmers)
- dorsal surface of body convex
- back legs long
- swim on their backs (hence the name)
- rest at surface with head hanging down into water
- painful bite
- ponds and lakes
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
BELOSTOMATIDAE (Giant Water bugs)
- front legs used for catching prey
- hind legs somewhat flattened
- ponds lakes
- can inflict a painful bite
- "toe biters"
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
NEPIDAE (water scorpions)
- slender and elongate
- some species resembles walking sticks
- some species are elongate oval
- front legs raptorial
- brownish
IMAGE
HEMPITERA
GELASTOCORIDAE (toad bugs)
- small
-heavy-bodied
- toad-like
- jumping insects
- front legs short
- live along ponds and streams
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
GERRIDAE (Water striders)
- middle and hind legs long
- front legs short
- some are winged, some wingless
- Dart about on the surface film of fresh and salt water
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
CIMICIDAE (bed bugs)
-flat
-oval
- brownish
- live in creases in matresses
- suck blood
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
MIRIDAE (leaf bugs)
- small
- oval or elongate
- live on plants
-brightly colored
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
REDUVIIDAE (Assassin Bugs)
- oval
- generally elongated bodies
- end of abdomen extends beyond wings
- live in meadows
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
PHYMATIDAE (ambush bugs)
- small
- greenish brownish
- femora muscled for catching prey
- usually seen on flowers
- eats wasp, bees, and ants
IMAGE
HEMPITERA
TINGIDAE (lace bugs)
- antanne and beak 4 segmented
- greyish
- somewhat rectangluar
- seen eating foliage of trees and shrubs
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
LYGAEIDAE (Seed Bug)
- small to medium sized
- elongate oval
- most brownish, some brightly patterned
- live in meadows
- some feed on sap, some predacious
IMAGE
HEMPITERA
COREIDAE (Leaf Footed Bugs)
- dark colored
- head narrow
- hind wing leaf like
- some plant feeders some predacious
IMAGE
HEMIPTERA
PENTATOMIDAE (stink bugs)
- broadly oval
- somewhat shield shaped
- produce disagreeable odor
- 5 segmented antanne
IMAGE
HYMENOPTERA
ICHNEUMONIDAE (Ichneumons)
- Wasp like
- vary in size and color, most have long ovipositer
- antanne 1/2 as long as body
IMAGE
HYMENOPTERA
MUTILLIDAE (Velvet Ants/Cow Killer)
- they are wasps that resemble ants but are hairy
- females inflict a very painful sting
- ave a structure called a stridulitrum on the metasoma which they use to produce a squeaking, chirping sound (more like a high pitched hum) to warn would-be predators
- females lack wings
-
IMAGE
HYMENOPTERA
FORMICIDAE (Ants)
- dorsal hump
- queens ans males usually have wings
- workers wingless
- live in ant colonies
- antanne strongly elbowed
IMAGE
HYMENOPTERA
Vespidae (Paper Wasps)
- make nests with papery material
- threadlike antanne
- triangular pronotum
- fold their wings lenthwise over body at rest
- notched eyes
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HYMENOPTERA
APIDAE (bees)
- solitary or social
- some hairy
- yellow and black markings
- Bumblebees live mostly on the ground, usually in a deserted mouse hole
- Honeybees nest in hives
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HYMENOPTERA
TENTHREDINIDAE (Sawflies)
- black or brown
- family common sawflies
- long thread-like antanne
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HYMENOPTERA
SIRICIDAE (Horntails)
- wasplike
- brownish or black
- triangular plate at end of abdomen
- larvae tunnel in wood
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HYMENOPTERA
CYNIPIDAE (gall wasps)
- humpbacked
- abdomen short and flattened on sides
- females lay eggs in flowers
- antanne long, not elbowed
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HYMENOPTERA
COLLETIDAE (Plaster bees)
- black
- wings clear
- meadows garden lawns
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HYMENOPTERA
HALICIDAE (alkali bees)
-most metallic green, some black
- live in meadows
- named cause may be seen nesting in alkaline clay
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HYMENOPTERA
MEGACHILIDAE (Leaf cutter bees)
- black
- wings clear to brownish
- among the world's most efficient pollinators because of their energetic swimming-like motion in the reproductive structures of flowers, which moves pollen, as needed for pollination
- solitary bees whose pollen-carrying structure (called scopa) is restricted to the ventral surface of the abdomen (rather than on the hind legs like in all other bee families)
- meadows and forest edges
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LEPIDOPTERA
ARCTIIDAE (Tiger Moths)-
- often brightly spotted or banded
- light colored
- feed on grasses, few feed on grass and shrubs
- adults are heavy bodied
- wings are held roof-like over body while at rest
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LEPIDOPTERA
LYMANTRIIDAE (Tussock Moths)-
- stout, hairy, brownish or whiteish
- lack simple eyes (compound eyes)
- males have prominent feathery antennae
- adults are short-lived, do not feed
- females are poor fliers (some are wingless)
- reduced probocus
- live in deciduous forests
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LEPIDOPTERA
LYMANTRIIDAE (Tussock Moths)-
- stout, hairy, brownish or whiteish
- lack simple eyes (compound eyes)
- males have prominent feathery antennae
- adults are short-lived, do not feed
- females are poor fliers (some are wingless)
- reduced probocus
- live in deciduous forests
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LEPIDOPTERA
NOCUIDAE (Noctuid Moths)-
- slender and thread-like antennae
- largest family in the Lepidoptera order
- most are nocturnal
- wings at rest are held flat or rooflike over the body
- woodlands
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