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80 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
rhetoric
the art of presenting ideas in a clear, effective, and persuasive manner
rhetorical questions
a question asked merely for rhetorical effect and not requiring an answer
rhetorical devices
literary techniques used to heighten the effectiveness of expression
riddle
a question requiring thought to answer or understand; a puzzle or conundrum
romantic
a term describing a characer or literary work that reflects the characteristics of Romanticism, the literary movement beginning in the late 18th century that stressed emotion, imagination, and individualism
round character
a character who demonstrates some complexity and who develops or changes in the course of a work
sarcasm
harsh, cutting language or tone intended to ridicule
satire
the use of humor the emphasize human weaknesses or imperfections in social institutions
scapegoat
a person or group that bears the blame for another
scene
a real or fictional episode; a division of an act in a play
setting
the time, place, and enviroment in which action takes place
simile
a comparison of two things using "like," "as," or other specifically compartive words
simple sentence
a sentence consisting of one independent clause and no dependent clause
solecism
nonstandard grammatical usage; a violation of grammatical rules
structure
the arrangement or framework of a sentence, paragraph, or entire work
rhetoric
the art of presenting ideas in a clear, effective, and persuasive manner
rhetorical questions
a question asked merely for rhetorical effect and not requiring an answer
rhetorical devices
literary techniques used to heighten the effectiveness of expression
rhetoric
the art of presenting ideas in a clear, effective, and persuasive manner
rhetorical questions
a question asked merely for rhetorical effect and not requiring an answer
rhetorical devices
literary techniques used to heighten the effectiveness of expression
riddle
a question requiring thought to answer or understand; a puzzle or conundrum
romantic
a term describing a characer or literary work that reflects the characteristics of Romanticism, the literary movement beginning in the late 18th century that stressed emotion, imagination, and individualism
riddle
a question requiring thought to answer or understand; a puzzle or conundrum
round character
a character who demonstrates some complexity and who develops or changes in the course of a work
sarcasm
harsh, cutting language or tone intended to ridicule
satire
the use of humor the emphasize human weaknesses or imperfections in social institutions
romantic
a term describing a characer or literary work that reflects the characteristics of Romanticism, the literary movement beginning in the late 18th century that stressed emotion, imagination, and individualism
scapegoat
a person or group that bears the blame for another
round character
a character who demonstrates some complexity and who develops or changes in the course of a work
scene
a real or fictional episode; a division of an act in a play
sarcasm
harsh, cutting language or tone intended to ridicule
setting
the time, place, and enviroment in which action takes place
satire
the use of humor the emphasize human weaknesses or imperfections in social institutions
simile
a comparison of two things using "like," "as," or other specifically compartive words
scapegoat
a person or group that bears the blame for another
simple sentence
a sentence consisting of one independent clause and no dependent clause
scene
a real or fictional episode; a division of an act in a play
solecism
nonstandard grammatical usage; a violation of grammatical rules
setting
the time, place, and enviroment in which action takes place
structure
the arrangement or framework of a sentence, paragraph, or entire work
simile
a comparison of two things using "like," "as," or other specifically compartive words
simple sentence
a sentence consisting of one independent clause and no dependent clause
solecism
nonstandard grammatical usage; a violation of grammatical rules
structure
the arrangement or framework of a sentence, paragraph, or entire work
style
the choices a writer makes; the combination of distinctive features of a literary work
surrealsim
an aritistic movement emphasizing the imagination and characterized by incongruous juxtapositions and lack of conscious control
syllepsis
a construction in which one word is used in two different senses ("After he threw the ball, he threw a fit."
syllogism
a three-part deductive argument in which a conclusion is based on a major premise and a minor premise ("All men are mortal; Socrates is a man; therefore, Socrates is mortal")
symbol
an object that is used to represent something else
synecdoche
using one part of an object to represent the entire object (for example, referring to a car simply as "wheels")
synesthesia
describing one kind of sensation in terms of another ("a loud color," "a sweet sound")
syntax
the manner in which words are arranged into sentences
tautogolgy
needless repetition in which adds no meaning or understanding ("widow woman," "free gift")
theme
the central idea of a work
thesis
the primary postion taken by a writer or speaker
tone
the attitude of a writer, usually implied, toward the subject or audience
topic
the subject treated in a paragraph or work
tragedy
a work in which the protagonist, a person of high degree, is engaged in a significant sturggel and which ends in ruin or destruction
topic
the subject treated in a paragraph or work
style
the choices a writer makes; the combination of distinctive features of a literary work
surrealsim
an aritistic movement emphasizing the imagination and characterized by incongruous juxtapositions and lack of conscious control
syllepsis
a construction in which one word is used in two different senses ("After he threw the ball, he threw a fit."
syllogism
a three-part deductive argument in which a conclusion is based on a major premise and a minor premise ("All men are mortal; Socrates is a man; therefore, Socrates is mortal")
symbol
an object that is used to represent something else
synecdoche
using one part of an object to represent the entire object (for example, referring to a car simply as "wheels")
synesthesia
describing one kind of sensation in terms of another ("a loud color," "a sweet sound")
syntax
the manner in which words are arranged into sentences
tautogolgy
needless repetition in which adds no meaning or understanding ("widow woman," "free gift")
theme
the central idea of a work
thesis
the primary postion taken by a writer or speaker
tone
the attitude of a writer, usually implied, toward the subject or audience
topic
the subject treated in a paragraph or work
tragedy
a work in which the protagonist, a person of high degree, is engaged in a significant sturggel and which ends in ruin or destruction
trilogy
a work in three parts, each of which is a complete work in itself
trite
overused and hackneyed
turning point
the point in a work in which a very significant change occurs
understatement
the deliberate representation of something as leser in magnitude than it acutally is; a deliberate under-emphasis
usage
the customary way language or its elements are used
vernacular
the everyday speech of a particular country or region, often involving nonstandard usage