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81 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Relevant
Connected with or related to the matter at hand.
Evolve
To develop gradually; to rise to a higher level
Sequel
A literary work or film continuing the story of one written or made earlier
Nonentity
A person or thing of no importance
Antics
Ridiculous and unpredictable behavior or actions
Annul
To reduce to nothing; to declare legally invalid or void
Collaborate
To work with; to work together
Facetious
Humorous, not meant seriously
Bantering
(v) To exchange playful remarks, tease (n) Talk that is playful and teasing
Venerated
To regard with reverence, look up to with great respect
Promontory
A high point of land extending into water
Deplore
To feel or express regret or disapproval
Laggard
(n) A person who moves slowly or falls behind
(adj.) Falling behind; slow to move, act, or respond.
Volatile
Highly changeable
Ample
More than enough, large, spacious
Amass
To bring together, collect, gather, especially for oneself
Skittish
Extremely nervous and easily frightened
Prodigious
Immense; extraordinary in bulk, size, or degree
Servile
Of or relating to a slave
Churlish
Lacking politeness or good manners
Ethical
Having to do with morals, values, right and wrong
Oblique
Slanting or sloping; not straightforward or direct
Muster
(v) To bring together for service or battle (n) A list of me for military service; a gathering, accumulation
Perturb
To trouble, make uneasy; to disturb greatly; to throw into confusion
Excerpt
A passage taken from a book, article, etc.
Unison
A sounding together; agreement of accord
Frugal
Economical, avoiding waste and luxury; scanty, poor, meager
Durable
Not easily worn out or destroyed; lasting for a long time
Qualm
A pang of conscience, uneasiness, misgiving, or doubt; a feeling of faintness or nausea
Jurisdiction
An area of authority or control; the right to administer justice
Prewriting
Includes choosing a topic, identifying a purpose and audience, and collecting and organizing details.
Drafting
Involves expressing your collected ideas and details in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Revising
Requires carefully reading and rereading your writing to find and fix errors and weakness.
Editing and Proofreading
Evaluating your writing and making changes to improve it.
Publishing and Presenting
Sharing your final writing product with others
Allusion
A reference to a statement, a person, a place, or an event from literature, the arts, history, religion, mythology, politics, sports, or science.
Title
The name given to a literary work or document.
Author
The writer of a literary work or document.
Genre
A class or category of artistic endeavor having a particular form, content, or technique.
Setting
The time and place of a literary work or document.
Plot
The series of related events that make up a story.
Exposition
The introduction or beginning of a work of fiction which tells who the characters are and usually what their conflict is.
Conflict
The struggle between opposing characters or opposing forces.
External Conflict
A character's struggle with an outside force, which may be another character, society as a whole, or a natural force.
Internal Conflict
A struggle that takes place within a character's own mind, a struggle between opposing needs, desires, or emotions.
Climax
The point in a story's plot that creates the greatest suspense or tension; the story's most exciting moment.
Resolution
The final part of the story in which the conflict is resolved and the story is brought to a close.
Suspense
The uncertainty or anxiety that a reader feels about what will happen in the story.
Foreshadowing
The use of clues or hints to suggest events that will occur later in the plot.
Flashback
Interruption in the present action of a plot to show events that happened at an earlier time.
Point of View
The vantage point from which a story is told.
Omniscient Point of View
A point of view in which the narrator knows everything about the characters and their problems.
Third-Person Limited Point of View
A point of view in which the narrator focuses on the thoughts and feelings of only one characters.
First-Person Point of View
A point of view in which one character, using the personal pronoun I, tells the story.
Character
A person or an animal in a story, play, or other literary work.
Characterization
The way a writer reveals the personality of a character.
Direct characterization
A method by which the writer reveals the personality of a character by simply telling the reader what kind of person the character is.
Indirect Characterization
A method by which the writer reveals the personality of a character through the character's appearance, thoughts, words, and actions, as well as what other characters think and say about him.
Protagonist
The main character in a work of literature.
Antagonist
The characters who opposes the protagonist.
Character Motivation
Any force that drives a character to behave in a certain way.
Static Character
A character who does not change much over the course of a literary work.
Dynamic Character
A character who changes as the result of a story's events.
Tone
The attitude a writer takes toward his or her subject, characters, and audience.
Mood
The overall atmosphere or feeling of a work of literature.
Style
The way a writer uses language, including diction, sentence structure, and tone.
Symbol
A person, a place, a thing, or an event that has meaning in itself and stands for something beyond itself as well.
Theme
The general idea or insight about life that a work of literature reveals.
Figure of Speech
A word or phrase that describes one thing in terms of another and is not meant to be understood as literally true.
Simile
A comparison between two unlike things, using a word such as like, as, than, or resembles.
Metaphor
An imaginative comparison between two unlike things in which one thing is said to be another.
Personification
A figure of speech in which an object or animal is spoken of as a if it had human feelings, thoughts, or attitudes.
Imagery
Language that appeals to the scenes.
Idiom
An expression peculiar to a particular language that means something different from the literal meaning of the words.
Myth
A story that explains Something about the world and typically involves Gods or other supernatural forces.
Novel
A long fictional story, usually longer than one hundred book pages.
Fiction
A prose account that is made up rather than true.
Nonfiction
Prose writing that deals with real people, things, events, and places.
Poetry
A kind of rhythmic compressed language that uses figures of speech and imagery designed to appeal to our emotions and imagination.
Prose
Any writing that is not poetry.
Narrative
A piece of writing that tells a story.