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38 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
Abstract
refers to language describing concepts rather than concrete images
Ad Hominem
an attack on the person in an argument rather than their ideas
Allegory
a work functioning on a symbolic level
Alliteration
the repetition of the initial consonant sounds, such as "Peter Piper etc."
Allusion
a reference contained in a work
Analogy
it is assumed that what applies to a situation also applies to a parallel situation. Comparrison between two different items.
Anecdote
a story or brief episode told by the writer or a character to illustrate a point
antecedent
the word, prase, or clause wo which a pronoun refers.
Antithesis
the presentation of two contrasting images. The ideas are balanced by word, prase, clause, or paragraphs. "to be or not to be" "ask not what your country can do for you, but what you..."
Cacophony
harsh and discordant sounds in a line or passage of a literary work.
Colloquial
the use of slang in writing. often to create local color and to provide an informal tone. Huck Finn
Comic Relief
humerous events that intensify the next tragic events
Didactic
writing whose purpose is to instruct or to teach. A didactic work isusualy formal and focuses on moral or ethical concerns
Epigraph
the use of a quotation at the beginning of a work that hints to its theme
Euphemism
a more acceptable and usually more pleasant way of saying something that might be innapropriate or uncomfortable.
Euphony
the pleasant presenattion of sounds in a literary work
Exposition
background information presented in a literary work
Figurative Language
body of devices that enables the writer to operate on levels other than the literal one. Includes metaphor, simile, symbol, motif, and hyperbole.
Form
shape or structure of a literary work
Hyperbole
extreme exaggeration, often humerous, can also be ironic.
Induction
the process that moves from a given series of specifics to a generalization
Invective
a verbally abusive attack
Metaphor
a direct comparrison between dissimilar things "your eyes are stars"
Metonymy
a figure of speech in which a representative term is used for a larger idea. The pen is mightier than the sword.
Monologue
a speech given by one character
Motif
repetition of variations of an image or idea in a work used to develop a theme or characters
Onomatopoeia
words that sound like the word they represent. Hiss, buzz
Parable
a story that operates on more than one level and usually teaches a moral lesson
Parody
a comic imitation of a work that ridicules the original
Pathos
the aspects of a literary work that elicit pity from the audience. An appeal to emoeioin that can be used as a means to pursuade
Pedantic
a term used to describe writing that borders on lecturing. I8t is scholarly and academic and often overly difficult and distant
Periodic Sentence
presents its main clause at the end of the sentence for emphasis and sentence variety. Phrases, dependent clauses precede the main clause
Reductio Ad Absurdum
The latin for "to reducte to the absurd" Technique useful in creating comic effect. considered a rhetorical fallacy because it reduces an arguent to an either/or choice
Simile
an indirect comparrison that uses the words like or as to link the differing items in the comparrison
Syllogism
the format of a formal argument that consists of a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion.
Synecdoche
A figure of speech that utilizes a part as representative of the whole. "all hands on deck"
Syntax
the grammatical sturctureof prose and poetry
Voice
can refer to the relationship between a sentence's subject and verbe (active voice and passive voice) or the total "sound" of the writer's style