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407 Cards in this Set

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- no warnings about the dangers of the wolf/forest - "did not know that it was dangerous to stop and listen to wolves"
- delivering cakes and butter
- wolf eats grandmother and LRRH
- ends with moral comparing to men, "But watch out if you haven't learned that tame wolves are the most dangerous of all
Perrault, "Little Red Riding Hood"
- mom tells her "when you're on in the woods, walk properly and don't stray from the path. Otherwise you'll fall and break the glass, and then there'll be nothing for grandmother"
-meets wolf immediately in woods, doesn't know "what a beast he was, and so wasn't in the least afraid of him.
- wolf convinces her to stray from the path and pick flowers
- wolf eats both, but hunter finds him, cuts belly to let them out, LRC fills wolf's belly with stones after which he dies.
-LRC realizes moral on own.
- follow up story involves them tricking the wolf to fall into boiling water smelling of sausages
Grimms, "Little Red Cap"
- wolf gets grandmother, puts flesh in pantry and bottle of blood on shelf.
- when little girl arrives wolf has her eat them, cat there says "phooey! you're a slut if you eat the flesh and drink the blood of granny"
- strip tease scene, wolf each time saying "throw them into the fire my child. You won't be needing them any longer"
- girl realizes, allowed outside with attached rope, which she transfers to plum tree and escapes.
anon, "The Story of Grandmother"
- dad still around, but "the poor girl bore all patiently, and dared not complain toher father, who would have scolded her if she had done so, for his wife governed him entirely"
- named Cinderwench or Cinderalla by the "not so rude and uncivil" younger sister (Charlotte).
- details of the dress of the time, Cinderella helps them get ready
- they teasingly invite her along, she declines.
- sits with her sisters at ball and shares treats, they don't recognize her
- at end, Cinderella "took them up, and, as she embraced them, said that she forgave them with all her heart, and begged them to love her always." She also marries them off to lords at palace.
Perrault, "Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper"
: mother dies at beginning
: father takes gift requests, she wants the first branch he brushes against
: Cinderella plants branches and weeps there and it grows
: a white bird at the tree grants wishes
: birds help her sort lentils from ashes when stepmother says she can come to the ball if she does that.
: Cinderella runs to a dovecote after ball, prince enlists father to get her out. Father thinks, "could it be Cinderella"
: prince repeats "she is my partner" and doesn't dance with others at the ball
: sticky staircase ensnares the shoe
: sisters cut off toe and heel, doves say, "Roo coo coo, blood's in the show, the shoe's too tight, the real bride's waiting another night."
: doves peck out eyes of the sisters
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: fish that Yeh-hsien releases and feeds
: mom tricks her and puts on clothes to trick fish into coming out, and she kills it.
: After mom serves it, "a man with his hair loose over his shoulders" comes from the sky to tell her to find bones and put them in her room.
: She prays to the bones and gets gold, pearls, dresses, and food.
: stepsisters recognize her at the cave festival, and in leaving Yeh-hsien loses slipper
: search throughout T'o-han for person who fits shoe
: step-family dies by flying stones.
: king wishes lots on fish bones, works for awhile, but then no response.
: bones ultimately washed away
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: Beauty's mother turns into a yellow cow and lives in the garden
: tasked to straighten hemp in order to go to theatre, cow does it
: cow says how to separate sesame and beans, which is second task
: Lin Lan admits cows help, stepmother kills it, Lin Lan hides bones in room.
: in anger she breaks earthenware pot, and in a flash nice stuff emerges
: loses shoe on way out, fishmonger and rice broker proposition marriage to pick it up, doesn't accept till scholar, who she does marry
: Pock face pushes her into well, try to replace her in the marriage
: Beauty turns into sparrow and says, "comb one, peep, comb twice, peep, come thrice, up to the spine of Pock Face."
: Pock face kills sparrow, is transformed into bamboo, first food, then bed, which scholar enjoys but not pock-face.
: Beauty comes back with old lady's help, Pock suggests tests walking on eggs, knives, and jumping into oil. Pock dies in oil, bones are sent back to mother who understands "carp flesh" instead of "daughter's flesh"
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: donkey that excretes gold
: wife tells husband on deathbed that he should only marry "if you meet a woman more beautiful, more accomplished, and more wise than I am"
: dad realizes that daughter fits the bill, "and burning with a desire that drove him made, he took it into his head that she ought to marry him." but "the young princess, saddened by this kind of love, grieved and wept night and day"
: godmother suggests "refusing without defying" by making impossible task with dresses of sky, moon, sun, and also to kill the donkey, all of which he does.
: escapes with magic trunk that stays under the ground, hidden by the donkey skin
: she ends up as scullery maid, dresses up on Sundays
: prince happens to see her, and "the beauty of her face, her lovely profile, her warm, ivory skin, her fine features, and her fresh youthfulness moved him a hundred times more" than the dresses.
: Donkeyskin makes him a cake, "and it is said she worked a little too hastily and that one of her precious rings accidentally fell from her finger into the dough. But those thought to be knowledgeable about the outcome to this story claim that she put it in there with a purpose."
: ring ends up being the slender slipper type, with people mutilating fingers to fit.
: No prince or potentate arrived there with as much splendor as the father of the bride, who, though he had once been in love with her, had since purified the fires that had inflamed his heart."
:"It is not difficult to see that the moral of the story teaches children that it is better to expose yourself to harsh adversity than to neglect your duty"
:"Finally, this story shows that pure water and brown bread are enough nourishment for young women, so long as they have beautiful clothes, and that there is no woman on earth who does not believe that she is beautiful and who does not see herself as getting the golden apple if she were to be mixed in with the three beauties of that famous contest"
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
:dad not involved, says, "let her marry the first that comes for her. And when this was known, who should be first but a nasty rough old man.
:So she didn't know what to do, and went to the hen-wife and asked her advice. The hen-wife said, "Say you will not take him unless they give you a coat of silver cloth"
:Say you will not take him unless they give you a coat made of the feathers of all the birds of the air. So they sent a man with a great heap of peas and the man cried to all the birds of the air, Each bird take a pea, and put down a feather"
:When it came to parting-time, the young lord said, "pray tell me, fair maid, where you live." But Catskin curtsied and said, "kind sir, if the truth I must tell, At the sign of the Basin of Water(or Broken Ladle or Broken Skimmer) I dwell"
"But this time the young lord followed her, and watched her change her fine dress of feathers for her catskin dress, and then he knew her for his own scullery-maid.
:So the doctor went to the lady of the castle, and told her her son would die if she did not consent to his marriage with Catskin. So she had to give way, and summoned Catskin to her. But she put on her coat of beaten gold, and went to the lady, who soon was glad to wed her son to so beautiful a maid.
:Now her father had never had any other child, and his wife had died; he was all alone in the world and sat moping and miserable. When the young lord came in he hardly looked up, till he saw a chair close up to him, and asked him, "pray, sir, had you not once a young daughter whom you would never see or own?"
Joseph Jacobs, "Catskin"
no warnings about the dangers of the wolf/forest - "did not know that it was dangerous to stop and listen to wolves"
Perrault, "Little Red Riding Hood"
delivering cakes and butter
Perrault, "Little Red Riding Hood"
wolf eats grandmother and LRRH
Perrault, "Little Red Riding Hood"
- ends with moral comparing to men, "But watch out if you haven't learned that tame wolves are the most dangerous of all"
Perrault, "Little Red Riding Hood"
- mom tells her "when you're on in the woods, walk properly and don't stray from the path. Otherwise you'll fall and break the glass, and then there'll be nothing for grandmother"
Grimms, "Little Red Cap"
-meets wolf immediately in woods, doesn't know "what a beast he was, and so wasn't in the least afraid of him.
Grimms, "Little Red Cap"
wolf convinces her to stray from the path and pick flowers
Grimms, "Little Red Cap"
- wolf eats both, but hunter finds him, cuts belly to let them out, LRC fills wolf's belly with stones after which he dies.
Grimms, "Little Red Cap"
LRC realizes moral on own.
Grimms, "Little Red Cap"
follow up story involves them tricking the wolf to fall into boiling water smelling of sausages
Grimms, "Little Red Cap"
wolf gets grandmother, puts flesh in pantry and bottle of blood on shelf.
anon, "The Story of Grandmother"
- when little girl arrives wolf has her eat them, cat there says "phooey! you're a slut if you eat the flesh and drink the blood of granny"
anon, "The Story of Grandmother"
- strip tease scene, wolf each time saying "throw them into the fire my child. You won't be needing them any longer"
anon, "The Story of Grandmother"
girl realizes, allowed outside with attached rope, which she transfers to plum tree and escapes.
anon, "The Story of Grandmother"
- dad still around, but "the poor girl bore all patiently, and dared not complain toher father, who would have scolded her if she had done so, for his wife governed him entirely"
Perrault, "Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper"
- named Cinderwench or Cinderalla by the "not so rude and uncivil" younger sister (Charlotte).
Perrault, "Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper"
details of the dress of the time, Cinderella helps them get ready
Perrault, "Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper"
they teasingly invite her along, she declines.
Perrault, "Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper"
- sits with her sisters at ball and shares treats, they don't recognize her
Perrault, "Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper"
- at end, Cinderella "took them up, and, as she embraced them, said that she forgave them with all her heart, and begged them to love her always." She also marries them off to lords at palace.
Perrault, "Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper"
: mother dies at beginning
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: father takes gift requests, she wants the first branch he brushes against
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: Cinderella plants branches and weeps there and it grows
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: a white bird at the tree grants wishes
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: birds help her sort lentils from ashes when stepmother says she can come to the ball if she does that.
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: Cinderella runs to a dovecote after ball, prince enlists father to get her out. Father thinks, "could it be Cinderella"
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: prince repeats "she is my partner" and doesn't dance with others at the ball
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: sticky staircase (pitch) ensnares the shoe
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: sisters cut off toe and heel, doves say, "Roo coo coo, blood's in the show, the shoe's too tight, the real bride's waiting another night."
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: doves peck out eyes of the sisters
Brothers Grimm, "Cinderella"
: fish that Yeh-hsien releases and feeds
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: mom tricks her and puts on clothes to trick fish into coming out, and she kills it.
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: After mom serves it, "a man with his hair loose over his shoulders" comes from the sky to tell her to find bones and put them in her room.
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: She prays to the bones and gets gold, pearls, dresses, and food.
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: stepsisters recognize her at the cave festival, and in leaving Yeh-hsien loses slipper
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: search throughout T'o-han for person who fits shoe
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: step-family dies by flying stones.
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: king wishes lots on fish bones, works for awhile, but then no response.
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: bones ultimately washed away
anon, "Yeh-hsien"
: Beauty's mother turns into a yellow cow and lives in the garden
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: tasked to straighten hemp in order to go to theatre, cow does it
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: cow says how to separate sesame and beans, which is second task
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: Lin Lan admits cows help, stepmother kills it, Lin Lan hides bones in room.
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: in anger she breaks earthenware pot, and in a flash nice stuff emerges
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: loses shoe on way out, fishmonger and rice broker proposition marriage to pick it up, doesn't accept till scholar, who she does marry
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: Pock face pushes her into well, try to replace her in the marriage
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: Beauty turns into sparrow and says, "comb one, peep, comb twice, peep, come thrice, up to the spine of Pock Face."
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: Pock face kills sparrow, is transformed into bamboo, first food, then bed, which scholar enjoys but not pock-face.
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: Beauty comes back with old lady's help, Pock suggests tests walking on eggs, knives, and jumping into oil. Pock dies in oil, bones are sent back to mother who understands "carp flesh" instead of "daughter's flesh"
Lin Lan, "Cinderella"
: donkey that excretes gold
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: wife tells husband on deathbed that he should only marry "if you meet a woman more beautiful, more accomplished, and more wise than I am"
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: dad realizes that daughter fits the bill, "and burning with a desire that drove him made, he took it into his head that she ought to marry him." but "the young princess, saddened by this kind of love, grieved and wept night and day"
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: godmother suggests "refusing without defying" by making impossible task with dresses of sky, moon, sun, and also to kill the donkey, all of which he does.
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: escapes with magic trunk that stays under the ground, hidden by the donkey skin
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: she ends up as scullery maid, dresses up on Sundays
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: prince happens to see her, and "the beauty of her face, her lovely profile, her warm, ivory skin, her fine features, and her fresh youthfulness moved him a hundred times more" than the dresses.
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: Donkeyskin makes him a cake, "and it is said she worked a little too hastily and that one of her precious rings accidentally fell from her finger into the dough. But those thought to be knowledgeable about the outcome to this story claim that she put it in there with a purpose."
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: ring ends up being the slender slipper type, with people mutilating fingers to fit.
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
: No prince or potentate arrived there with as much splendor as the father of the bride, who, though he had once been in love with her, had since purified the fires that had inflamed his heart."
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
:"It is not difficult to see that the moral of the story teaches children that it is better to expose yourself to harsh adversity than to neglect your duty"
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
:"Finally, this story shows that pure water and brown bread are enough nourishment for young women, so long as they have beautiful clothes, and that there is no woman on earth who does not believe that she is beautiful and who does not see herself as getting the golden apple if she were to be mixed in with the three beauties of that famous contest"
Perrault, "Donkeyskin"
:dad not involved, says, "let her marry the first that comes for her. And when this was known, who should be first but a nasty rough old man.
Joseph Jacobs, "Catskin"
:So she didn't know what to do, and went to the hen-wife and asked her advice. The hen-wife said, "Say you will not take him unless they give you a coat of silver cloth"
Joseph Jacobs, "Catskin"
:Say you will not take him unless they give you a coat made of the feathers of all the birds of the air. So they sent a man with a great heap of peas and the man cried to all the birds of the air, Each bird take a pea, and put down a feather"
Joseph Jacobs, "Catskin"
:When it came to parting-time, the young lord said, "pray tell me, fair maid, where you live." But Catskin curtsied and said, "kind sir, if the truth I must tell, At the sign of the Basin of Water(or Broken Ladle or Broken Skimmer) I dwell"
Joseph Jacobs, "Catskin"
"But this time the young lord followed her, and watched her change her fine dress of feathers for her catskin dress, and then he knew her for his own scullery-maid.
Joseph Jacobs, "Catskin"
Now her father had never had any other child, and his wife had died; he was all alone in the world and sat moping and miserable. When the young lord came in he hardly looked up, till he saw a chair close up to him, and asked him, pray, sir, had you not once a young daughter whom you would never see or own?"""
Joseph Jacobs, "Catskin"
:So the doctor went to the lady of the castle, and told her her son would die if she did not consent to his marriage with Catskin. So she had to give way, and summoned Catskin to her. But she put on her coat of beaten gold, and went to the lady, who soon was glad to wed her son to so beautiful a maid.
Joseph Jacobs, "Catskin"
: Find me the girl, rich or poor, humble or well-born, whose foot this anklet will fit. For I promised the queen as she lay dying that I would marry that girl and no other.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
: A wrinkled matron spoke up. "Why not marry the princess? Why give her to a stranger and deprive yourself?" The words were hardly spoken when the king summoned the qadi to pen the papers for the marriage.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
: The princess was pleased to know that she was to be wed. But who her husband was she had no inkling.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
: Then, knowing only that she must escape, she ran onto the terrace and leaped over the palace wall, landing in a tanner's yard which lay below. She pressed a handful of gold into the tanner's palm and said, "Can you make me a suit of leather to hide me from head to heels, showing nothing but my eyes? I want it by tomorrow's dawn.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
Time and again a soldier would stumble across the princess lying at the gate and ask, "Have you seen the king's daughter?" And she would reply, "My name is Juleidah for my coat of skins, My eyes are weak, my sight is dim, My ears are deaf, I cannot hear. I care for no one far or near.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
On and on the queen poured out her praises of the woman, until the prince's heart was on fire. Finally, his mother concluded, "I wish I had asked her father's name so that I could engage her to be your bride." And the sultan's son replied, "When you return tonight to continue your entertainment, I shall stand outside the wazir's door and wait until she leaves. I'll ask her then about her father and her station."
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
Willing and not willing to let her help, the cook gave her a piece of dough to shape. Juleidah began to make a cake, and when no one was watching, she pushed the prince's ring inside it.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
The prince felt pity for the strange half-wit and asked his servant to bring back her cake. When he tore open the load, look, his own ring was inside! The ring he had lost the night of the wazir's entertainment. Understanding now where lay the land of ladles and paddles, the prince gave orders to turn back.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
As she approached, he drew the dagger that hung at his side and slahed her leather coat from collar to hem.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
From country to country he journeyed, entering one city and leaving the next, taking with him in chains the old woman who had first suggested to him that he marry his own daughter.
anon, "The Princess in the Suit of Leather
There was a certain Brahmin whose wife had died leaving him one little son.
anon, "The Story of the Black Cow
But the cakes made by the Brahmin's wife for her stepson were of ashes with just a little flour mixed in to give them the appearance of food, that the Brahmin might not notice; and the child ate in silence, for he was afraid to complain, yet, when he was alone in the forest he wept from hunger, and a black cow, one of the heard, saw this, and asked him what was the matter.
anon, "The Story of the Black Cow
At last the girl confessed that they ate sweets every day, and the black cow provided the feast.
anon, "The Story of the Black Cow
Now, in the forest was a hole, which led to the home of the Great Snake, which, together with a bull, holds up the universe.
anon, "The Story of the Black Cow
The cow asked no favours for herself, but when the snake asked what she would like, she said she would like her son, as she called the Brahmin's son, to be clothes in gold from head to foot, and that all his body might shine in gold. This wish the snake readily granted, but both cow and boy afterwards regretted their request for they feared robbers.
anon, "The Story of the Black Cow
When they cut [the fish] open all present admired the lovely golden hair, and when the Princess saw it, she said she would never be happy again until she met the owner.
anon, "The Story of the Black Cow
…in a frenzy of remorse, the Brahmin's son remembered his faithful friend and hastened to the place in the distant forest where he had last seen her. Arrived there he found only a few bones of dead cattle strewn about.
anon, "The Story of the Black Cow
She didn't give him a moment's peace until he consented. "But still, I feel sorry for the poor children," he said.
Brothers Grimm, "Hansel and Gretel
"Oh, father," said Hansel. "I'm looking at my white kitten, which is sitting up on the room trying to bid me farewell."
Brothers Grimm, "Hansel and Gretel
But it wasn't an ax that they heard, it was a branch that their father had fastened to a dead tree, and the wind was banging it back and forth.
Brothers Grimm, "Hansel and Gretel
"You wicked children! Why did you sleep so long in the woods? We thought you weren't ever going to come back." But the father was overjoyed, because he had been upset at how he had abandoned them in the forest.
Brothers Grimm, "Hansel and Gretel
"Nibble, nibble, is it a mouse? Who's that nibbling at my house?" The children replied: "The wind so mild, the heavenly child." and the continued eating, without getting distracted.
Brothers Grimm, "Hansel and Gretel
The old woman had only pretended to be friendly. She was really a wicked witch, who lay in wait for children. She had built the little house of bread just to lure them inside.
Brothers Grimm, "Hansel and Gretel
Hansel reached into his pockets and pulled out one handful of jewels after another. Their worries were over, and they lived together in perfect happiness.
Brothers Grimm, "Hansel and Gretel
My fairy tale is done. See the mouse run. Whoever catches it can make a great big fur hat out of it.
Brothers Grimm, "Hansel and Gretel
"Ah," said the woman, and she sighed deeply. "If only I had a child as red as blood and as white as snow!"
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
The little boy walked in the door, and the devil got her to speak sweetly to him and say: "My son, would you like an apple?" But she gave him a look full of hate.
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
"Mother," said Little Marlene, "brother is sitting by the door and looks pale. He has an apple in his hand, and when I asked him to give me the apple, he didn't answer. It was very scary. "Go back to him," the mother said, "and if he doesn't answer, slap his face."
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
"Oh, wife, this stew tastes so good! Give me some more." The more he ate the more he wanted. "Give me some more," he said.
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
A mist arose from the tree, and in the middle of the mist burned a flame, and from the flame a beautiful bird emerged and began singing gloriously.
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
"My mother, she slew me, my father, he ate me, my sister, Little Marlene, Gathered up my bones, Tied them up in silk, And put them under the juniper tree. Tweet, tweet, what a fine bird I am."
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
"No," said the bird. "I never sing the second time for nothing. Give me that gold chain, and I'll sing it for you again."
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
The mother stopped up her ears, and closed her eyes, for she didn't want to see or hear anything, but the roaring in her ears was like the wildest of storms, and her eyes burned and flashed like lightning.
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
As she went out the door, bam! The bird dropped the millstone on her head and crushed her to death. The father and Little Marlene heard the crash and went outside. Smoke, flames, and fire were rising up from the spot, and when they vanished, little brother was standing there. He took his father and Little Marlene by the hand, and the three of them were overjoyed.
Brothers Grimm, "The Juniper Tree"
"This, too, must be spun in one night, and if you accomplish it you shall be my wife." For he thought, "Although she is but a miller's daughter, I am not likely to find any one richer in the whole world."
Brothers Grimm, "Rumpelstiltskin"
"No, I would rather have something living than all the treasures in the world."
Brothers Grimm, "Rumpelstiltskin"
"The devil told you that! Cried the little man, and in his anger he stamped with his right foot so hard that it went into the ground above his knee; then he seized his left foot with both his hands in such a fury that he split in two, and there was an end of him.
Brothers Grimm, "Rumpelstiltskin"
"If it is all as you say you may have as much rampion as you like, on one condition - the child that will come into the world must be given to me. It shall go well with the child, and I will care for it like a mother."
Brothers Grimm, "Rapunzel"
"Since that is the ladder I will climb it, and seek my fortune."
Brothers Grimm, "Rapunzel"
"O wicked child," cried the witch, "what is this I hear! I thought I had hidden thee from all the world, and thou hast betrayed me!"
Brothers Grimm, "Rapunzel"
And when her tears touched his eyes they became clear again, and he could see with them as well as ever.
Brothers Grimm, "Rapunzel"
"Well, said the fisherman, "no need of so many words about the matter, as you can speak I had much rather let you swim away"
Brothers Grimm, "The Fisherman and his Wife"
"O man, O man! - if man you be, Or flounder, flounder, in the sea - Such a tiresome wife I've got, For she wants what I do not."
Brothers Grimm, "The Fisherman and his Wife"
"Oh yes," said the man, "if it will only last we can live in this fine castle and be very well contented.
Brothers Grimm, "The Fisherman and his Wife"
"It is not the right thing to do - not at all the right thing," thought the man. He did not at all want to go, and yet he went all the same.
Brothers Grimm, "The Fisherman and his Wife"
All the while the scent of the sweet jelly was spreading throughout the room, where there were quantities of flies, who were attracted by it and flew to partake.
Brothers Grimm, "The Gallant Tailor
"Comrade, good day! There you sit looking over the wide world! I am on the way thither to seek my fortune: have you a fancy to go with me?
Brothers Grimm, "The Gallant Tailor
"Well thrown," said the tailor; "but the stone fell back to earth again, - I will throw you one that will never come back." So he felt in his pocket, took out the bird, and threw it into the air.
Brothers Grimm, "The Gallant Tailor
"It is not strength that is lacking," answered the little tailor; how should it to one who has slain seven at one blow! I just jumped over the tree because the hunters are shooting down there in the bushes. You jump it too, if you can.
Brothers Grimm, "The Gallant Tailor
"and from there he let one stone after another fall on the chest of one of the giants. For a long time the giant was quite unaware of this, but at last he waked up and pushed his comrade, and said, "What are you hitting me for?"
Brothers Grimm, "The Gallant Tailor
"And so, as she perceived of what low birth her husband was, she went to her father the next morning and told him all, and begged him to set her free from a man who was nothing better than a tailor.
Brothers Grimm, "The Gallant Tailor
"I have slain seven at one blow, killed two giants, caught a unicorn, and taken a wild board, and shall I be afraid of those who are standing outside my door?"
Brothers Grimm, "The Gallant Tailor
But one morning Milky-white gave no milk, and they didn't know what to do.
Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk
As you are so sharp, says he, I don't mind doing a swop with you - your cow for these beans.
Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk
"It's breakfast you want, is it?" says the great big tall woman, "it's breakfast you'll be if you don’t move off from here. My man is an ogre and there's nothing he likes better than boys broiled on toast.
Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk
"Fee-fi-fo-fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman, Be he alive, or be he dead, I'll have his bones to grind my bread." "Nonsense, dear," said his wife, you're dreaming. Or perhaps you smell the scraps of that little boy you liked so much for yesterday's dinner."
Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk
"Then Jack crept out on tiptoe from his oven, and as he was passing the ogre he took one of the bags of gold under his arm, and off he pelters till he came to the beanstalk."
Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk
"That's strange, mum," said Jack, "I dare say I could tell you something about that, but I'm so hungry I can't speak till I've had something to eat."
Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk
"Then Jack gave another chop with the axe, and the beanstalk was cut in two and began to topple over. Then the ogre fell down and broke his crown, and the beanstalk came toppling after.
Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk
"Little pig, I know where there is a nice field of turnips." "Where?" said the little pig. "Oh, in Mr. Smith's Home-field, and if you will be ready to-morrow morning I will call for you, and we will go together, and get some for dinner
Jacobs, "The Three Little Pigs"
"Well, the little pig bustled up the next morning at four o'clock, and went off for the apples, hoping to get back before the wolf came; but he had further to go, and had to climb the tree, so that just as he was coming down from it, he saw the wolf coming,
Jacobs, "The Three Little Pigs"
"When the little pig saw what he was about, he hung on the pot full of water, and made up a blazing fire, and, just as the wolf was coming down, took off the cover, and in fell the wolf.
Jacobs, "The Three Little Pigs"
They mistook for stupidity what was in reality the sign of a kind and generous nature.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
The poor child was the underdog in the family, and he got the blame for everything. All the same, he was the wisest and shrewdest of the brothers, and though he may have spoken little, he listened carefully to everything.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
His heart was heavy with sorrow when he said to her: "It must be obvious to you that we can no longer feed our children. I refuse to watch them die of hunger before my very eyes, and I've made up my mind to take them out into the woods tomorrow and to leave them there.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
While lying in bed, he realized that serious things were being discussed, and he got up quietly and slipped under his father's stool in order to listen without being seen.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
Now the woodcutter and his wife had no sooner reached home when the lord of the manor sent them a sum of ten crowns that he had owned them for a long time and that they had despaired of ever getting. This gave them a new lease on life, for the poor creatures had been dying of hunger.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
The woodcutter finally lost his patience, for she had repeated more than twenty times that he would regret it and that she had told him so. It was not that the woodcutter was any less distressed than his wife, but she drove him crazy, and he was of the same opinion as many other people, who like women to say the right thing, but are troubled when they are always right.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
Pierrot was the oldest son, whom she loved more than all the others because he was something of a redhead, and she herself had reddish hair.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
Night fell, and a strong win arose, which made them feel anxious and scared… At every step they tripped and fell into the mud, getting up again all covered with mud and not knowing what to do with their hands.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
"Alas my poor children! Don't you realize where you are? Haven't you heard that this house belongs to an ogre who eats little children?
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
They were not yet terribly vicious, but they showed great promise, for already they were in the habit of killing little children to suck their blood.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
The ogre, waking up at midnight, regretted having postponed until tomorrow what he could have done that night. He leaped headlong out of bed and grabbed a knife, saying: "Now then, let's see how the little rascals are faring. I won't make the same mistake twice!"
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
Now the ogre was feeling exhausted after having traveled so far in vain (for seven-league boots are very fatiguing to their owner), and he wanted to rest for awhile.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
"Your husband is in great danger, for he has been captured by a band of thieves who have sworn to kill him if he does not hand over all his gold and silver.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
Many people do not agree about this last adventure and claim that Little Thumbling never stole money from the ogre, just the seven-leage boots about which he had no qualms, since they had been to chase little children.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
The king paid him handsomely to carry orders to the army, but countless ladies gave him any price he named to get news of their lovers, and this became his best source of income.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
Moral: You never worry about having too many children when they are handsome, well bred, strong, and when they shine. But if one is sickly or mute, he is despised, scorened, ridicules. But sometimes it is the little run Who makes the family's happiness.
Charles Perrault, "Little Thumbling
Child, said the stepmother one day, go to the grocer's shop and buy me a pound of candles. She gave her the money and the little girl went, bought the candles, and started on her return. There was a stile to cross. She put down the candles whilst she got over the stile. Up came a dog and ran off with the candles.
Joseph Jacobs, "The Rose-Tree"
"Now," said the wicked woman, "lay your head down on the billet whilst I part your hair." Well! She laid down her little golden head without feat; and whist! Down came the axe, and it was off. So the mother wiped the axe and laughed.
Joseph Jacobs, "The Rose-Tree"
The husband tasted them and shook his head. He said they tasted very strangely. She gave some to the little boy, but he would not eat.
Joseph Jacobs, "The Rose-Tree"
It was spring and there among the flowers was a white bird; and it sang, and sang, and sang like an angel out of heaven.
Joseph Jacobs, "The Rose-Tree"
"My wicked mother slew me, my dear father ate me, my little brother whom I love sits below, and I sing above, stick, stock, stone dead.
Joseph Jacobs, "The Rose-Tree"
Then the bird rattled the millstone against the eaves of the house a third time; and the stepmother said: "It thunders again' perhaps the thunder has brought something for me," and she ran out; but the moment she stepped outside the door, down fell the millstone on her head; and so she died.
Joseph Jacobs, "The Rose-Tree"
"fee fie, fo, fum, I smell the blood of some earthly one.
Joseph Jacobs, "Molly Whuppie
"Who have you there wife?" "Eh," said the wife, "it's three poor lassies cold and hungry, and they will go away. Ye won't touch 'em, man."
Joseph Jacobs, "Molly Whuppie
And in the middle of the night up rose the giant, armed with a great club, and felt for the necks with the straw. It was dark. He took his own lassies out of the bed on to the floor, and battered them until they were dead, and then lay down again, thinking he had managed finely.
Joseph Jacobs, "Molly Whuppie
"if you would manage better, and go back, and steal the giant's sword that hangs on the back of his bed, I would give your eldest sister my eldest son to mary."
Joseph Jacobs, "Molly Whuppie
So Molly took the shears and cut a hole in the sack, and took out the needle and thread with her, and jumped down and helped the giant's wife up into the sack, and sewed up the hole.
Joseph Jacobs, "Molly Whuppie
One day, her mother said: "Your aunty is ill. I'm going to see her and won't be back tonight. Look after your brother and ask your Granny to stay with you tonight!
Chiang Mi, "Goldflower and the Bear"
Suddenly they heard a knock at the door. Brother hugged her and cried: "I'm afraid!"
Chiang Mi, "Goldflower and the Bear"
They heard a strange but kindly voice saying: I'm Granny." Brother was very happy and shouted: "Sister, open the door! Granny had come!" Goldflower leaned against the door and asked: "Is that you Granny? What's wrong with your voice?"
Chiang Mi, "Goldflower and the Bear"
The clever girl stoked the fire brighter and, wow, there was a pair of hairy feet! Now she realized this isn't Granny.
Chiang Mi, "Goldflower and the Bear"
She grabbed a handful of seeds and took of her brother's hat, pretending to be catching lice in his hair.
Chiang Mi, "Goldflower and the Bear"
The Bear wanted to climb the tree, but [name] had covered it with grease. The Bear slipped again and again. The Bear could only wait under the tree hapless while Goldflower laughed up on the tree. "Granny, do you want to eat some pears? Please get me the spear in the house.
Chiang Mi, "Goldflower and the Bear"
She had approached no nearer than twenty-five feet from the bed when she saw that it was not her grandmother but the wolf, for even in a nightcap a wolf does not look any more like your grandmother than the Metro-Goldwyn lion looks like Calvin Coolidge.
James Thurber, "The Little Girl and the Wolf
So the little girl took an automatic out of her basket and shot the wolf dead.
James Thurber, "The Little Girl and the Wolf
Moral: It is not so easy to fool little girls nowadays as it used to be.
James Thurber, "The Little Girl and the Wolf
The sharp white teeth, the horrid grin, And Wolfie said, 'May I come in?' Poor Grandmamma was terrified, 'He's going to eat me up!' she cried. And she was absolutely right. He ate her up in one big bite.
Roald Dahl, "Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf"
That's wrong! Cried Wolf. Have you forgot to tell me what BIG TEETH I've got? Ah well, no matter what you say, I'm going to eat you anyway.
Roald Dahl, "Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf"
But this man had the misfortune of having a blue beard, which made him look so ugly and frightful that women and girls alike fled at the sight of him
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
What added even more to their sense of disgust was that he had already married several women, and no one knew what had become of them
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
As for this particular key, it is the key to the small room at the end of the long passage on the lower floor. Open anything you want. Go anywhere you wish. But I absolutely forbid you to enter that little room, and if you so much as open it a crack, there will be no limit to my anger.
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
Then they went upstairs to the storerooms, where they could not find words to describe the number and beauty of the tapestries, beds, sofas, cabinets, stands, and tables
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
So tormented was she by her curiosity that, without stopping to think about how rude it was to leave her friends, she raced down a little staircase so fast that more than once she thought she was going to break her neck. When she reached the door to the room, she stopped to think for a moment about how her husband had forbidden her to enter, and she reflected on the harm that might come her way for being disobedient.
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
She thought she would die of fright, and the key to the room, which she was about to pull out of the lock, dropped from her hand.
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
She looked so beautiful and was so distressed that she would have melted a heart of stone, but Bluebeard had a heart harder than any rock. You must die, madam, he declared, and it will be right away. Since I must die, she replied, gazing at him with eyes full of tears, give me a little time to say my prayers
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
The gate was opened, and two horsemen, sworeds in hand, dashed in and made straight for Bluebeard.
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
It turned out that Bluebeard had left no heirs, and so his wife took possession of the entire estate.
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
Moral: Curiousity, in spite of its many charms, Can bring with it serious regrets; You can see a thousand examples of it every day. Women succumb, but it's a fleeting pleasure; As soon as you satisfy it, it ceases to be. And it always proves very very costly.
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
Another moral: No longer are husbands so terrible, Demanding the impossible, Acting unhappy and jealous. With their wives they toe the line; And whatever color their beards might be, It's not hard to tell which of the pair is master.
Charles Perrault, "Bluebeard"
No one knew who Mr. Fox was; but he was certainly brave, and surely rich, and of all her lovers Lady Mary cared for him alone.
Joseph Jacobs, "Mr. Fox
Mr. Fox was away for a day or two on business and Lady Mary set out for Mr. Fox's castle. She came at last to it, and a fine strong house it was, with high walls and a deep moat. And when she came up to the gateway she saw written on it: Be bold, be bold.
Joseph Jacobs, "Mr. Fox
The swored cut off the hand, which jumped up into the air, and fell o fall places in the world into Lady Mary's lap.
Joseph Jacobs, "Mr. Fox
I dreamed, said Lady Mary, that I went yestermorn to your castle, and I found it in the woods, with high walls, and a deep moat, and over the gateway was written…
Joseph Jacobs, "Mr. Fox
It is not so, nor it was not so. And God forbid it should be so, said [name]
Joseph Jacobs, "Mr. Fox
But it is so, and it was so. Here's hand and ring I have to show.
Joseph Jacobs, "Mr. Fox
He asked for something to eat, and when the eldest girl went to the door and was about to hand him a piece of bread, he just touched her and she jumped into his basket.
Brothers Grimm, "Fitcher's Bird"
He also gave her an egg and said: Carry it with you wherever you go, because if it gets lost, something terrible will happen.
Brothers Grimm, "Fitcher's Bird"
In the middle of he room was a large, bloody basin filled with dead people who had been chopped to pieces.
Brothers Grimm, "Fitcher's Bird"
After handing over the keys and egg, he went away, and she put the egg in a safe place.
Brothers Grimm, "Fitcher's Bird"
There in the basin were her two sisters, cruelly murdered and chopped to pieces. But she set to work gathering all their body parts and put them in their proper places.
Brothers Grimm, "Fitcher's Bird"
Very well, she replied, but first you must take a basketful of gold to my father and mother, and you must carry it on your own back
Brothers Grimm, "Fitcher's Bird"
He sat down to rest for a moment, but right away one of the girls cried out from the basket: I'm looking out of my little window, and I see that you're resting. Get a move on.
Brothers Grimm, "Fitcher's Bird"
Oh Fitcher's feathered bird, where are you from? From feathered Fitze Fitcher's house I've come. And my young bride there, what has she done? She's swept the house all the way through, And from the attic window she's looking right at you.
Brothers Grimm, "Fitcher's Bird"
But the girl didn't care for him as a girl should care for her betrothed, and she didn't trust him. Whenever she looked at him or thought of him, her heart filled with dread.
Brothers Grimm, "The Robber Bridegroom
The girl made excused and claimed she couldn't find the way there. But the bridegroom said: Next Sunday you have to come to my place. I've already invited the guests, and I'll put ashes on the path so that you can find your way through the woods.
Brothers Grimm, "The Robber Bridegroom
The girl looked up and saw that the voice was coming from a bird in a cage hangin on the wall. Once again it cried out "Turn back, turn back, my pretty young bride, In a house of murderers you've arrived.
Brothers Grimm, "The Robber Bridegroom
You think you're a bride about to be married, but the only wedding you'll celebrate is one with death.
Brothers Grimm, "The Robber Bridegroom
Don't stir and don't move or it'll be the end of you. At night, when the robbers are sleeping, we'll escape. I've been waiting for this moment for a long time.
Brothers Grimm, "The Robber Bridegroom
They were drunk and paid no attention to her screams and sobs. They gave her wine to drink, three glasses full, one white, one red, one yellow, and soon her heart burst in two. They tore off her fine clothes, put her on a table, chopped her beautiful body into pieces, and sprinkled them with salt.
Brothers Grimm, "The Robber Bridegroom
Another of the robbers asked: "Have you looked over there behind the big barrel?" Just then the old woman called out: "Come and eat! You can look again tomorrow. The finger isn't going to go running off.
Brothers Grimm, "The Robber Bridegroom
The bride sat quietly and didn't utter a word. Finally the bridegroom said to his bride: Don't you have anything to say, my love? You have to tell us something. Very well, she replied. I will tell you about a dream I had..
Brothers Grimm, "The Robber Bridegroom
The two older sisters were vain and proud because the family had money. They tried to act like ladies of the court and paid no attention at all to girls from merchant families.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
After finishing the housework, she red or sang while spinning. Her two sisters, by contrast, were bored to death.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
Don't you want me to buy anything for you? Asked her father. You are so kind to think of me, Beauty answered. Can you bring me a rose, for there are none here?
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
Once he entered the great hall, however, he found a warm fire and a table laden with food, with just a single place setting. Since the rain and snow had soaked him to the bone, he went over to the first to get dry. He thought to himself, the master of the house, or his servants, will not be offended by the liberties I am taking. No doubt someone will be back soon.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
You are very ungrateful, said the beast in a terrible voice. I have saved your life by sheltering you in my castle, and you repay me by stealing my roses, which I love more than anything in the world. You will have to pay for your offenses.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
But you said that you have some daughters. I am prepared to forgive you if one of your daughters consents to die in your place.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
Beauty, take these roses. They have cost your poor father dearly.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
When Beauty left with her father, the two mean sisters rubbed their eyes with an onion in order to draw tears. But the brothers cried real tears, as did the merchant. Only Beauty did not cry at all, because she did not want to make every even more sad.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
Despite the faces they made in order to look as if they were distressed, they were visibly happy to have lost their sister
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
Beauty, said the monster, will you let me watch you dine? You are my master, said Beauty, trembling. No, you are the only mistress here, replied Beast. If I bother you, order me to go, and I will leave at once.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
Tell me, don't you find me very ugly? Yes, I do, said Beauty. I don't know how to lie. But I do think that you are very kind.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
Finding herself alone, Beauty felt great compassion for poor Beast. Alas, she said, it is too bad he is so ugly, for he is so kind.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
When the week had gone by, the two sisters started tearing out their hair and performed so well that Beauty promised to stay another four or five days. At the same time she felt guilty about the grief she was causing poor Beast, whom she loved with all her heart and missed seeing.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
It is neither good looks nor great wit that makes a woman happy with her husband, but character, virtue, and kindness, and Beast has all those good qualities.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
Feeling no revulsion at his looks, she threw herself on him and, realizing that his heart was still beating, she got some water from the canal and threw it on him
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
How great was her surprise when she discovered that Beast had disappeared and that a young prince more beautiful than the day was bright was lying at her feet, thanking her for having broken a magic spell.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
I know your hearts and all the malice that is in them. You will be turned into two statues, but you will keep your sense beneath the stone that envelops you.
Beaumont, "The Beauty and the Beast
What's going on princess? Stones would be moved to pity if they could hear you
Grimms, "The Frog King"
I don't want your dresses, your pearls and jewels, or your golden crown. But if you promise to cherish me and let me be your companion and playmaate, and let me sit beside you at the table and eat from your little golden plate, drink from your little cup and sleep in your little bed, if you promise me that, I will crawl down into the well and bring back the golden ball
Grimms, "The Frog King"
Then the king said, when you make a promise, you must keep it. Just go and let him in.
Grimms, "The Frog King"
Then she became really cross, picked him up, and threw him with all her might against the wall. Now you'll get your rest, you disgusting frog!
Grimms, "The Frog King"
Heinrich, the coach is falling apart! No, my lord, tis not the coach, But a hoop from round my heart, Which was in such pain while you were down in the well, Living there as a frog
Grimms, "The Frog King"
And it chanced that while she slept there passed by three fairies who held mankind somewhat in scoren, and these, when they beheld the sleeping queen, halted, and gazing upon her beauty, took counsel together how they might protect her and throw a spell upon her.
Straparola, "The Pig King"
But when he debated in his mind and considered that this son, let him be what he might, was of his own begetting, he put aside the cruel purpose which he had been harbouring, and, seized with pity and grief, he made up his mind that the son should be brought up and nurtured like a rational being and not as a brute beast.
Straparola, "The Pig King"
Then, when he approached the king and queen, he would rub his sides against their fair garments, defiling them with all manner of dirt, but because he was indeed their own son they bore it all.
Straparola, "The Pig King"
Do not consider him, but think of the king and of me, and remember that your daughter will inherit this whole kingdom when the king and I shall be dead
Straparola, "The Pig King"
What am I to do with this foul beast? This very night, while he lies asleep, I will kill him. The pig prince, who was not far off, heard these words, but said nothing (…) He lay down by his spouse, who was not long in falling asleep, and then he struck her with his sharp hoofs and drove them into her breast so that he killed her
Straparola, "The Pig King"
he said, in reply to the queen's bitter reproaches, that he had only dealt with his wife as she intended to deal with him.
Straparola, "The Pig King"
When morning came the pig got up and ranged abroad to pasture, as was his wont, and very soon after the queen went to the bride's chamber, expecting to find that she had met with the same fate as her sisters, but when she saw her lying in the bed, all defiled with mud as it was, and looking pleased and contented...
Straparola, "The Pig King"
And when they saw this, the delight of the king and queen was very great, and the king gave order that before anyone should leave the chamber the pig's hide should be torn to shreds.
Straparola, "The Pig King"
When Prince Ivan fell asleep, she went out into the street, cast off her skin, turned into a lovely maiden, and cried: Nurses, nurses! Make something!
Afanasev, "The Frog Princess
She waved her right hand, and lakes and woods appeared; she waved her left hand, and various birds began to fly about.
Afanasev, "The Frog Princess
Prince Ivan Ivan went home first, found his wife's skin somewhere, took it and burned it. She arrived, looked for the skin, but it was gone, burned. She lay down to sleep with Prince Ivan, but before daybreak she said to him: If you had waited a little, I would have been yours; now only God knows when we will be together again.
Afanasev, "The Frog Princess
Oh Prince Ivan, said the old woman, thou hast been long a-coming! She has begun to forget thee, she is marrying someone else.
Afanasev, "The Frog Princess
He began to pursue them, and chased and chased them, and came within ten yards of overtaking them: but on their carpet they flew into Russia, and for some reason he could not get into Russia, so he turned back.
Afanasev, "The Frog Princess
After catching nothing for three days and nights, he was surprised to find that he had taken a five-colored turtle. He got the turtle into the boat and lay down to sleep.
anon, "Urashima the Fisherman
I saw you here, along at sea, she answered with a smile, and I wanted so much to talk to you! I came on the clouds and the wind.
anon, "Urashima the Fisherman
Seven young girls soon came out of the gate, telling each other as they passed him that he was Turtle's husband (…). That was how he learned her name.
anon, "Urashima the Fisherman
They say the dying fox turns toward his lair and the lesser man longs to go home. I'd never believed it, but now I know it's true
anon, "Urashima the Fisherman
We gave ourselves to each other forever! She lamented. We promised we'd be as true as gold or the rocks of the mountains! How could a little homesickness make you want to leave me?
anon, "Urashima the Fisherman
Dearest, if you don’t forget me and find you want to come back, then grip this box hard. But you mustn't open it, ever.
anon, "Urashima the Fisherman
But the clouds hid her paradise from him and left him nothing but his grief.
anon, "Urashima the Fisherman
There was a very fine christening; and the Princess had for her godmothers all the fairies they could find in the whole kingdom (there were seven of them), so that every one of them might confer a gift upon her.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
a good old woman, alone, was spinning with her spindle. This good woman had never heard of the King's orders against spindles
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
the king, who came up at hearing the noise, remembered what the fairies had foretold. He knew very well that this must come to pass, since the fairies had foretold it, and he caused the Princess to be carried into the finest room in his palace, and to be laid upon a bed all embroidered with gold and silver.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
As soon as she touched them they all fell asleep, not to awake again until their mistress did.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
As soon as he began to get near to the wood, all the great trees, the bushes, and brambles gave way of themselves to let him pass through.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
He, however, very well knew, by the ruby faces and pimpled noses of the porters, that they were only asleep.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
Their discourse was not very connected, but they were the better pleased, for where there is much love there is little eloquence.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
She was entirely and very magnificently dressed; but his royal Highness took care not to tell her that she was dressed like his great-grandmother, and had a high collar.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
The King, his father, who was a good man, believed him; but his mother could not be persuaded that it was true; and seeing that he went almost every day a-hunting, and that he always had some excuse ready for so doing, though he had been out three or four nights together, she began to suspect that he was married.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
during which they had two children; the elder, a daughter, was named Dawn, and the younger, a son, they called Day, because he was a great deal handsomer than his sister.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
But he never dared to trust her with his secret; he feared her, though he loved her, for she was of the race of the Ogres, and the King married her for her vast riches alone.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
Upon which he began to weep, the great knife fell out of his hand, and he went into the back yard and killed a little lamb, and dressed it with such good sauce that his mistress assured him she had never eaten anything so good in her life
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
She was well satisfied with her cruel deeds, and she invented a story to tell the King on his return, of how the Queen his wife and her two children had been devoured by mad wolves.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
They were brought out accordingly, and the executioners were just going to throw them into the tub, when the King, who was not so soon expected, entered the court on horseback and asked, with the utmost astonishment, what was the meaning of that horrible spectacle.
Perrault, "The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods"
Thy wish shall be fulfilled; before a year has gone by, thou shalt bring a daughter into the world. And as the frog foretold, so it happened.
Grimms, "The Sleeping Beauty"
Not only did he bid to it his relations, friends, and acquaintances, but also the wise women, that they might be kind and favorable to the child. There were thirteen of them in his kingtom, but as he had only provided twelve golden plates for them to eat from, one of them had to be left out.
Grimms, "The Sleeping Beauty"
And this sleep fell upon the whole castle; the king and queen, who had returned and were in the great hall, fell fast asleep, and with them the whole court.
Grimms, "The Sleeping Beauty"
And a rumour went abroad in all that country of the beautiful sleeping Rosamon, for so was the princess called, and from time to time many kings' sons came and tried to force their way through the hedge; but it was impossible for them to do so, for the thorns held fast together like strong hands, and the young men were caught by them, and not being able to get free, there died a lamentable death.
Grimms, "The Sleeping Beauty"
While she was sewing and looking out at the snow, she pricked her finger with a needle, and three drops of blood fell onto the snow. The red looked so beautiful against the white snow that she thought to herself: "If only I had a child as white as snow, as red as blood, and as black as the wood of the window frame."
Grimms, "Snow White"
She was a beautiful lady, but proud and arrogant and could not bear being second to anyone in beauty. She had a magic mirror, and when she stood in front of it and looked at herself, she would say: "Mirror, mirror, on the wall, Who's the fairest one of all?"
Grimms, "Snow White"
When she was seven years old, she was as beautiful as the bright day and more beautiful than the queen herself.
Grimms, "Snow White"
Take the child out to the forest. I don't want to have to lay eyes on her ever again. You must kill her and bring me her lungs and liver as proof of your deed.
Grimms, "Snow White"
When night fell, she saw a little cottage and went inside to rest. Everything in the house was tiny, and indescribably dainty and spotless. There was a little table, with seven little plates on a white cloth.
Grimms, "Snow White"
Later she was so tired that she tried out the beds, but they did not seem to be the right size. The first was too long, the second too short, but the seventh one was just right, and she stayed in it.
Grimms, "Snow White"
The dwarfs told her: "If you will keep hour for us, cook, make the beds, wash, sew, knit, and keep everything neat and tidy, then you can stay with us, and we'll give you everything you need."
Grimms, "Snow White"
She stood in front of the old woman and let her put on the new lace. The old woman laced her up so quickly and so tightly that Snow White's breath was cut off, and she fell down as if dead.
Grimms, "Snow White"
Her envious heart was finally at peace, as much as an envious heart can be.
Grimms, "Snow White"
They brought the coffin up to the top of a mountain, and one of them was always there to keep vigil. Animals also came to mourn Snow White, first an owl, then a raven, and finally a dove.
Grimms, "Snow White"
The queen was so terrified that she just stood there and couldn't budge an inch. Iron slippers had already been heated up over a fire of coals. They were brought in with tongs and set right in front of her. She had to put on ht ered hot iron shoes and dance in them until she dropped to the ground dead.
Grimms, "Snow White"
The queen was good to her stepdaughter. But one day the eachrais urlair came in, and she said to the queen that she was a fool to be so good to her stepdaughter.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
We will kill the king's greyhound bitch and leave it on the landing of the stairs, so that the king things that it is [name] who has done it. We will make [name] swear three baptismal oaths, that she wil lnot be on foot, she will not be on horseback, and she will not be on the green earth the day she tells of it.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
That cannot be, said the king, and he went to bed, and he ate not a bite, and he drank not a drop: and if day came early, the king rose earlier than that, and went to the hill to hunt.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
That cannot be, said the king, and he went to bed, and he ate not a bite, and he drank not a drop: and if day came early, the king rose earlier than that, and went to the hill to hunt.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
Well, said the king, it hurts me to give you that, but you shall have that, said the king. He went to the squinting sandy cook and asked him if he would hide his child for one night.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
He came to a great forest, with no edge and no end, and he was going to leave [name] there. He cut off the end of one of her fingers. "Does that hurt you, daughter?" he said. It doesn't hurt me, father, she said, because it is you who did.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
The one eyed grey cat told one of the other cats to go up the tree and wee what was there: for king's blood or knight's blood was falling into the cauldron.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
The one-eyed gray cat asked her which she would rather, to go to bed with him, or to sleep with the others. She said she would rather go with him, he was the one she liked the look of best.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
The one-eyed gray cat was really the King of Lochlann's son, and his twelve squires along with him. They had been bewitched by his stepmother, and now the spell was loosed.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
She asked the king as a favor not to have them christened.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
Little trout, little trout, said she, am not I, said she, the most beautiful woman that ever was in Ireland?
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
When she opened the box, there were three grains in it… one grain of ice stuck in her forehead and another in each of her palms, and she fell dead and cold.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
What will you give me, said the queen, if I bring her alive? I don't expect to see her alive, said he, but I would be glad to see her even though she were dead.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
The wild boar was set free. When they came out of the church, the Queen of Ireland was caught and burnt in the fire.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
When the king was going home, he said to his daughter, [name], that she had done ill by him: he had come from home with a wife, and he was going home now without one. And [name] said: It wasn't that way: you came with a monster, but I have a woman friend, and you shall have her, and you will go home with a wife.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
I got shoes of paper there on a glass pavement, a bit of butter on an ember, porridge in a creel, a greatcoat of chaff and a short coat of buttermilk. I hadn't gone far when I fell, and the glass pavement broke, (…). All I had had was gone, and I was as poor as I was to start with. And I left them there.
anon, "Lasair Gheug, the King of Ireland's Daughter
Meanwhile Snow White held court, rolling her china-blue doll eyes open and shut and sometimes referring to her mirror, as women do.
Anne Sexton, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"
And so she danced until she was dead, a subterranean figure, her tongue flicking in and out like a gas jet.
Anne Sexton, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"
The queen fastened it tightly around her bodice, as tight as an Ace bandage, so tight that Snow White swooned.
Anne Sexton, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"
Until that moment Snow White had been no more important than a dust mouse under the bed.
Anne Sexton, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"
Her stepmother, a beauty in her own right, though eaten, of course, by age, would hear of no beauty surpassing her own.
Anne Sexton, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"
No matter what life you lead, the virgin is a lovely number: cheecks as fragile as cigarette paper, arms and legs made of Limoges, lips Vin Du Rhone, rolling her china-blue doll eyes open and shut.
Anne Sexton, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"
My father lost me to The Beast at cards
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
But then the snow comes, you cannot escape it, it followed us from Russia as if it ran behind our carriage..
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
I watched with the furious cynicism peculiar to women whom circumstances force mutely to witness folly, while my father, fired in his desperation by more and yet more draughts of the firewater they call grappa, rids himself of the last scraps of my inheritance.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
This white rose, unnatural, out of season, that now my nervous fingers ripped, petal by petal, apart as my father magnificently concluded the career he had made of catastrophe.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
He is the carnival figure made of papier mache and crepe hair; and yet he has the Devil's knack at cards.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
A queen, a king, an ace. I saw them in the mirror. Oh, I know he thought he could not lose me; besides, back with me would come all he had lost, the unravelled fortunes of our family at one blow restored.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
My tear-beslobbered father wants a rose to show that I forgive him. When I break off a stem, I prick my finger and so he gets his rose all smeared with blood
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
If you don't stop plaguing the nursemiads, my beauty, the tiger-man will come and take you away.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
For now my own skin was my sole capital in the world and today I'd make my first investment
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
My master's sole desire is to see the pretty young lady unclothed nude without her dress and that only for the one time after which she will be returned to her father
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
as if, to his credit, he was ashamed of his own request even as his mouthpiece made it for him
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
But I must stress that you should give me only the same amount of money that you would give to any other woman in such circumstances.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
The sight of a young lady's skin that no man has seen before - stammered the valet. I wished I'd rolled in the hay with every lad on my father's farm, to disqualify myself from this humiliating bargain.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
That he should want so little was the reason why I could not give it; I did not need to speak for The Beast to understand me.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
If you will not let him see you without your clothes - I involuntarily shook my head - you must, then, prepare yourself for the sight of my master, naked.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
The Beast had clearly paid cash on the nail for his glimpse of my bosom, and paid up promptly, as if it had been a sight I might have died of showing.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
The beast and his carnivorous bed of bone and I, white, shaking, raw, approaching him as if offering, in myself, the key to a peaceable kingdom in which his appetite need not be my extinction.
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
He will lick the skin off me!
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
My earrings turned back to water and trickled down my shoulders; I shrugged the drops off my beautiful fur
Angela Carter, "The Tiger's Bride"
for it must be admitted: Sally is in love with Ed because of his stupidity, his monumental and almost energetic stupidity: energetic, because Ed's stupidity is not passive. He's no mere blockhead; you'd have to be working at it to be that stupid.
Margaret Atwood, "Bluebeard's Egg"
Ed doesn't now what happened with these marriages, what went wrong. His protestations of ignorance, his refusal to discuss the finer points, is frustrating to Sally, because she would like to hear the whole story
Margaret Atwood, "Bluebeard's Egg"
In fact, he's just like a button: he's so bright and shiny. If he were mine, I'd get him bronzed and keep him on the mantelpiece. Marylynn is even better than Sally at concocting formulations for Ed's particular brand of stupidity, which can irritate Sally
Margaret Atwood, "Bluebeard's Egg"
She teases him frequently about these troops of women, which follow him around everywhere, which are invisible to Ed but which she can see as plain as day.
Margaret Atwood, "Bluebeard's Egg"
The great temptation is to cast herself in the role of the cunning heroine, but again, it's too predictable. And Ed certainly isn't the wizard; he's nowhere near sinister enough.
Margaret Atwood, "Bluebeard's Egg"
Ed isn't the Bluebeard: Ed is the egg. Ed Egg, blank and pristine and lovely. Stupid too. Boiled, probably. Sally smiles fondly.
Margaret Atwood, "Bluebeard's Egg"
Ed is standing too close to her, and as Sally comes up behind them she sees his left arm, held close to his side, the back of it pressed against Marylynn, her shimmering upper thigh, her ass to be exact. Marylynn does not move away.
Margaret Atwood, "Bluebeard's Egg"
If this is it, Sally has been wrong about Ed, for years, forever. Her version of Ed is not something she's perceived but something that's been perpetrated on her, by Ed himself, for reasons of his own. Possibly Ed is not stupid. Possibly he's enormously clever. She thinks of moment after moment when this cleverness, this cunning, would have shown itself if it were there, but didn't.
Margaret Atwood, "Bluebeard's Egg"
It was so lovely out in the country
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
the stork was walking about there and chatter in Egyptian, for he had learnt that language from his mother.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
You don't think this is the whole world! Said their mother. Why, it stretches a long way on the other side of the garden, right into the parson's field!
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
all the image of their father - the wretch, he never comes to visit me!
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
He's my own child and no mistake! He's really quite handsome if you look at him properly.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
She's the best bred of anyone here! She has Spanish blood - that's why she's so solid looking, and you see, she has a piece of red cloth tied round her leg!
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
And what's more, I dare say he'll grow quite handsome, and in time get a little smaller!
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
You're ugly all right, and no mistake! Said the wild ducks. But that's all the same to us, as long as you don't marry into the family.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
Close by here, in another marsh, are some lovely sweet wild geese, young ladies every one of them, and they can say Quack with the best of them.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
And the cat said, Can you arch your back and purr and give our sparks? No! Then you shouldn't express an opinion when sensible people are talking!
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
He did not envy them in the slightest - how could it possibly enter his mind to wish himself so beautiful!
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
But it doesn't matter - better to be killed by them than snapped at by the ducks, pecked by the hens, kicked by the girl who looks after the poulty-yard, and suffer misery throughout the winter!
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
The new one is the most beautiful of them all! He is so young and lovely! And the old swans bowed before him.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Ugly Duckling"
Heaven's, listen to the voice of innocence! Said his father. And what the child had said was whispered from one to another.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Emperor's New Clothes
The Emperor gave each of the rogues an Order of Knighthood to hang in his buttonhold and the title of Knight of the Loom.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Emperor's New Clothes
The old minister listened very carefully so that he could say the same thing when he returned to the Emperor.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Emperor's New Clothes
But when he remembered that no one who was stupid or unfit for his job could see it, he felt somewhat hesitant about going to see for himself. Now, of course, he was quite certain that, as far as he was concerned, there were no grounds for fear, but nevertheless he felt he would rather send someone else first to see how they were getting on.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Emperor's New Clothes
No one but a real princess could possibly be so sensitive.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Princess and the Pea"
there were plenty of princess, though whether they were real princesses he could neve rquite find out: there was always something that was not just right
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Princess and the Pea"
A door opened and the wind caught the dancer: she flew like a sylph right into the stove next to the tin-soldier, burst into flame and vanished.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
The tin-soldier stood in a blaze of light and felt terribly hot, but whether it was really the heat of the fire or the heat of love, he didn't know
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
The fish had been caught, taken to market, sold and brought up to the kitchen, where the maid had cut it open with a big knife.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
Stop him! Stop him! He's not paid his toll! He's not shown his passport!
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
And so they made a boat from a newspaper, put the tin-soldier I nthe middle, and away he sailed down the gutter
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
There were only two who didn't move from their places
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
It was altogether charming, but the most charming thing about it was undoubtedly a little young lady who stood in the middle of the open castle door: she was cut out of cardboard, too, but she wore a skirt of the finest linen and a narrow blue ribbon draped round her shoulders.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
only a single one of them was a little different: he had one leg because he had been cast the last, and there wasn't enough tin left.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Steadfast Tin Soldier"
She was trying to get warm, people said. Nobody knew what lovely things she had seen and in what glory she had gone with her old Grannie to the happiness of the New Year.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Match Girl"
She took the little girl into her arms, and together they flew in joy and splendour, up, up, to where there was no cold, no hunger, no fear.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Match Girl"
And she quickly struck the rest of her matches in the bunch, for she did so want to keep her Granniethere
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Match Girl"
Right up to the little girl it came… but then the match went out, and nothing could be seen but the massive cold wall.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Match Girl"
You see, it was New Year's Eve; that's what she was thinking about
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Match Girl"
Along the street, in that same cold and dark, went a poor little girl in bare feet - well, yes, it's true, she had slippers on when she left home; but what was the good of that/
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Match Girl"
Unseen, she kissed the forehead of the bride, gave a smile to the Prince, and then with the other children of the air she climbed to a rose-red cloud that was sailing to the sky
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
When for three hundred years we have striven to do the good we can, then we shall win an immortal soul and have a share in mankind's eternal happiness.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
Eternity for her depends on the power outside her
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
She knew this was the last evening she would see the prince for whom she had turned her back on kindred and home, given up her beautiful voice, and every day suffered hours of agony without his suspecting a thing
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
My happiness will give you pleasure, because you're fonder of me than any of the others.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
I would rather have you, my dear mute foundling with the speaking eyes.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
The Prince was going off to take a look at his neighbour's kingdom - that was how they put it, meaning that it was really to take a look at his neighbour's daughter.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
Day by day she became dearer to the Prince. He loved her as one loves a dear good child, but he didn't dream of making her his Queen; and yet she had to become his wife, or else she would never win an immortal soul, but on his wedding morning would be turned to foam on the sea.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
The Prince said that she must never leave him, and she was allowed to sleep on a velvet cushion outside his door.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
Every step she took, as the witch had foretold, was as though she were treading on sharp knives and pricking gimets; but she gladly put up with that.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
She called the horrible fat water-snakes her little chicks and allowed them to sprawl about her great spongy bosom.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
She had to pass through the middle of these battering eddies in order to get to the sea witch's domain; and here for a long stretch there was no other way that over hot bubbling mud - the witch called it her swamp.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
We've no immortal soul; we shall never had another life. We're like the green rush - once it's been cut, it can't grow green again.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
She peeped out from among the green rushes and, when the wind caught her long silvery veil and someone saw it, they fancied it was a swan spreading its wings.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
Just for a moment she felt quite pleased, for now he would come down to her; but then she remembered that humans can't live under the water.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
nor did they ever see any of the delights the mermaids promised, because when the ship sank the crew were drowned, and only as dead men did they come to the palace of the sea King.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
None of them was so full of longing as the youngest
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
but the youngest made hers quite round like the sun, and would only have flowers that shone red like it
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
The sea King down there had been a widower for some years, but his old mother kept house for him.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Little Mermaid"
Her heart was so full of sunshine and peace and joy that at last it broke, and her soul flew on the sunbeams to heaven, where there was no one to ask about the red shoes.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Red Shoes"
Please don't cut off my head! Said Karen, for then I can't show that I'm sorry for my sins.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Red Shoes"
She tore off her stockings, but the shoes had grown fast to her feet and so dance she did and dance she must, over field and furrow, in rain and sun, by night and day; but the nighttime was the worse
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Red Shoes"
she had to dance a few steps and, once she had started, her feet went on dancing just as though the shoes had some power over them.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Red Shoes"
Next Sunday there was Communion, and Karen looked at the black shoes, and she looked at the red ones… And then she looked at the red ones again - and put the red ones on.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Red Shoes"
But the old lady didn't realize that they were red, for she would never have allowed Karen to go to Confirmation in red shoes.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Red Shoes"
Of course, they weren't exactly the right shoes for a funeral, but they were the only ones she had; and so she wore them on her bare feet, as she followed the humble straw coffin
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Red Shoes"
and in winter she had to wear big wooden clogs which chafed her insteps most horribly, until they were quite red.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Red Shoes"
In the course of the winter the bird had collected and given away so many crumbs that the weight of them all would have equalled that of the whole loaf that Inger had trodden on.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
To think that an angel of God should be weeping for her! Why was she granted this favour?
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
Lord, my God, haven't I too, like Inger, sometimes trodden thoughtlessly on the blessings you gave? Hadn't I, too, gone with pride in my heart? Andyet you, in your mercy, did not let me sink, held me up. Do not abandon me in my last hour.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
Oh, I do wish she would, said the little girl, and refused to be comforted. I'll give up my doll's house, if they let her come up. It's so horrible for poor Inger.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
Sorrowing tears that a mother sheds for her child will always reach it, but they don't set it free; they burn, they only make the torment greater.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
And then there was a forlorn crowd waiting fo rthe door of mercy to be opened.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
She embroidered lies and did crochet from rash remarks that had fallen to the ground - anything, in fact, that could lead to injury and corruption.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
It was down into her brewery that Inger sank, and that's not a place you can stand for long.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
But as she stood with one foot on the loaf and lifted the other, the loaf sank down with her deeper and deeper, and she disappeared altogether, till there was nothing to be seen but a black bubbling swamp
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
Often when you were little you trod on my apron; now you're older, I'm afraid you'll end by treading on my heard. And sure enough, she did.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
As she grew older, she got worse rather than better; but she was very pretty, and that was her misfortune, for otherwise she'd have been slapped a good deal oftener than she was.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
She was a poor child, proud and vain; there was a bad streak in her, as the saying is.
Hans Christian Andersen, "The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf"
Master of all masters, get out of your barnacle and and put on your squibs and crackers. For white-faced simminy has got a spark of hot cockalorum on its tail, and unless you get some pondalorum high topper mountain will be all on hot cockalorum.
Jacobs, "Master of all Masters"
any standard rhyme like one, two buckle my shoe
Monroe and Francis, from "Mother Goose's Melodies"
Four line rhymes starting and ending with the same
Lear, from The Complete Nonsense Book
There was an old person of Buda, Whose conduct grew ruder and ruder, Till at last with a hammer they silenced his clamor, by smashing that person of buda.
Lear, from The Complete Nonsense Book
anything else not already covered.
Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland