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37 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
York Driscoll: ID & Book.
ID: Chief citizen of Dawson's Landing, judge of the county court. "FFV"

Book: Puddnhead Wilson
Colonel Cecil Burleigh Essex: ID & Book.
ID: Valet de Chambre's father, who has FFV status.

Book: Puddnhead Wilson.
What does F.F.V. stand for?
First Families of Virginia.
Roxana: ID & Book.
ID: Aka Roxy, woman who is 1/16th black but freed after her master dies.

Book: Puddnhead Wilson.
Valet de Chambre: ID & Book.
ID: Roxy's real child's real name, meant to be a slave.

Book: Puddnhead Wilson.
Anna Murray: ID & Book.
ID: Free woman who marries Frederick.

Book: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
Mr Edward Covey: ID & Book.
ID: Slave breaker.

Book: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
Capt Aaron Anthony: ID & Book.
ID: Frederick's 1st master, and possibly his father.

Book: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
Lucretia Auld: ID & Book.
ID: Daughter of Capt Aaron Anthony, and Wife of Mr Thomas Auld.

Book: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
Sophia Auld: ID & Book.
ID: Wife of Hugh Auld, and Frederick's new mistress when he is relocated to Baltimore.

Book: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
Hugh Auld: ID & Book.
ID: Frederick's new master upon being relocated to Baltimore.

Book: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
Harriet Bailey: ID & Book.
ID: Frederick Douglass' mother.

Book: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
Percy Driscoll: ID & Book.
ID: Father of Thomas a Becket Driscoll, and younger brother of York Driscoll.

Book: Puddnhead Wilson
Wu Tsing: ID & Book.
ID: Rich man with concubines, such as An-Mei Hsu's mother.

Book: Joy Luck Club.
Nuyer: ID & Book.
ID: Popo's disowned daughter, An-Mei's mother, and 3rd Concubine Fourth Wife of Wu Tsing.

Book: Joy Luck Club.
An-Mei Hsu: ID & Book.
ID: Daughter of Nuyer, with scar on neck.

Book: Joy Luck Club.
Rose Jordan: ID & Book.
ID: American born daughter of An-Mei Hsu, who lost younger brother Bing at beach.

Book: Joy Luck Club.
Homer Baron: ID & Book.
ID: Emily's lover

Book: A Rose For Emily
Colonel Sartoris Snopes: ID & Book.
ID: Abner Snopes' son, named after Confederate soldier.

Book: Barn Burning
Major de Spain: ID & Book.
ID: Rich man who sues Abner Snopes for ruining his expensive rug.

Book: Barn Burning.
Who is the author of "Barn Burning" and "A Rose for Emily"?
William Faulkner
"I assert most unhesitatingly, taht the religion of the south is a mere covering for the most horrid crimes,--a justifier of the most appaling barbarity...and a dark shelter, under which the darkest, foulest, grossest, and most infernal deeds ... find the strongest protection.... For of all slaveholders with whom I have ever met, religious slaveholders are the worst."

Who is the speaker/writer & what is the title of the work?
Frederick Douglass; Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.
"I assert most unhesitatingly, that the religion of the south is a mere covering for the most horrid crimes,--a justifier of the most appaling barbarity...and a dark shelter, under which the darkest, foulest, grossest, and most infernal deeds ... find the strongest protection.... For of all slaveholders with whom I have ever met, religious slaveholders are the worst."

Name the key person in the writer's experience who exemplified this paradox.

What was this person's "profession" or "occupation"?
Rev. Rigby Hopkins

Minister of the Reformed Methodist Church.
"I assert most unhesitatingly, that the religion of the south is a mere covering for the most horrid crimes,--a justifier of the most appaling barbarity...and a dark shelter, under which the darkest, foulest, grossest, and most infernal deeds ... find the strongest protection.... For of all slaveholders with whom I have ever met, religious slaveholders are the worst."

What EVIDENCE does the writer cite to support his view that "religion...is a mere covering for [the] most infernal deeds" of which the writer accuses those who perpetrate them? What are 3 of the "darkest, foulest ... infernal deeds" of which the writer accuses those who perpetrate them?
1 - If a slave looks dissatisfied, it is said he has the devil in him and it must be whipped out.

2 - If a slave ventures to vindicate his conduct when censured for it, he is guilty of impudence.

3 - If a slave speaks loudly when being spoken to by his master then he is getting high minded and should be taken down a button hole lower.
What is the contradiction of "religion... [as] a ...covering for....horrid crimes"?
Excerpts from the Bible were misinterpreted and translated to justify why slaves were kept in their place. It's ironic because religion is supposed to be about good will towards fellow men.
"My mistress was ... a kind and tender-hearted woman; and in the simplicity of her soul she ... treat[ed] me as she supposed one human being ought to treat another. ... Slavery soon proved its ability to divest her of these heavenly qualities. Under its influence, the tender heart become stone, and the lamb-like disposition gave way to one of tiger-like fierceness."

Who says this and what book is it from?
Frederick Douglass in "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave".
"My mistress was ... a kind and tender-hearted woman; and in the simplicity of her soul she ... treat[ed] me as she supposed one human being ought to treat another. ... Slavery soon proved its ability to divest her of these heavenly qualities. Under its influence, the tender heart become stone, and the lamb-like disposition gave way to one of tiger-like fierceness."

What is the name of the person being described in this passage?
Sophia Auld.
"My mistress was ... a kind and tender-hearted woman; and in the simplicity of her soul she ... treat[ed] me as she supposed one human being ought to treat another. ... Slavery soon proved its ability to divest her of these heavenly qualities. Under its influence, the tender heart become stone, and the lamb-like disposition gave way to one of tiger-like fierceness."

What was the central (most impt) initiative this person had taken to treat the writer as "she supposed one human being ought to treat another"? That is, what she had begun to do that would enhance his abilities?

Who or what intervened to change this person's behavior toward the writer.
She taught Frederick the alphabet and began to teach him to spell three letter words.

Her husband, Hugh Auld.
"My mistress was ... a kind and tender-hearted woman; and in the simplicity of her soul she ... treat[ed] me as she supposed one human being ought to treat another. ... Slavery soon proved its ability to divest her of these heavenly qualities. Under its influence, the tender heart become stone, and the lamb-like disposition gave way to one of tiger-like fierceness."

How would you account for the major change in this person, not only in particulars of behavior, but in her fundamental attitude toward the writer?
Society and her husband hardened her as they influenced her to believe that slaves were meant to be inferior.
What is a protagonist?
The main character in a drama or other literary work; a leader or principal figure.
What does vindicate mean?
To justify or prove righteousness.
"We had long thought of them as tableau, [she] a slender figure in white in the background, [he] a spraddled silhouette in the foreground, his back to her and clutching a horsewhip, the 2 of them framed by the back-flung front door. So when she got to be 30 and was still single, we were not pleased exactly, but vindicated..."

What is the title of this work and who is the speaker?
"A Rose for Emily"; a townsperson.
"We had long thought of them as tableau, [she] a slender figure in white in the background, [he] a spraddled silhouette in the foreground, his back to her and clutching a horsewhip, the 2 of them framed by the back-flung front door. So when she got to be 30 and was still single, we were not pleased exactly, but vindicated..."

Who is the "slender figure in white" in this "tableau"? Who is the "spraddled sihouette in the foreground"?
Emily; her father
"We had long thought of them as tableau, [she] a slender figure in white in the background, [he] a spraddled silhouette in the foreground, his back to her and clutching a horsewhip, the 2 of them framed by the back-flung front door. So when she got to be 30 and was still single, we were not pleased exactly, but vindicated..."

What is the situation the narrator is describing? That is, what is the "spraddled" persona in the foreground of the tableau doing in regard to the "slender figure in white"?
The father is driving away potential suitors in pursuit of Emily.
"We had long thought of them as tableau, [she] a slender figure in white in the background, [he] a spraddled silhouette in the foreground, his back to her and clutching a horsewhip, the 2 of them framed by the back-flung front door. So when she got to be 30 and was still single, we were not pleased exactly, but vindicated..."

What is the significance of the object the "spraddled" persona is clutching in his hand?
He used a horse whip to drive suitors away as if they were animals. This is a reminder of how the slaveholders kept their slaves in line.
"We had long thought of them as tableau, [she] a slender figure in white in the background, [he] a spraddled silhouette in the foreground, his back to her and clutching a horsewhip, the 2 of them framed by the back-flung front door. So when she got to be 30 and was still single, we were not pleased exactly, but vindicated..."

What does the speaker mean when he says he [and others] felt "vindicated" when the persona ["in white"] in the tableau "got to be 30"?
They knew that Emily would end up being alone.
What is "character"?
A description of a person's attributes, traits, or abilities.