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30 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
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The primary purpose of hospice care
Increase quality of the pt's life through pain and symptom management.
45.4
Benefits of home health
Decrease cost when compare to institutional care. Pt stays in familiar surrounding, often results in fewer and shorter hospital visits.
45.5
Hospice pt life span
Pts admitted to hospice care have a life-threatening condition or terminal illness and are expected to die within 6 months.
45.4
The Haddon matrix framework
A framework for injury prevention. According to the Haddon injuries occur in a certain time sequence: the pre-event phase, event phase, and post event phase. Each phase has a host/person involved with injury and equipment involved. Prevention can be focus in any stage.
45.5
Notes on crushing tablets
Not all are meant to be crush, for instance extended-released tabled may enter the pt's blood stream too fast if crushed, causing an overdose.
45.7
What two questions to be sure to ask about dementia pt
What is the pts usual baseline function?
How does function today vary from baseline?
45.7
Long-term issues encountered by pt with degenerative neuromuscular disease
hypoventilation
45.9
The purpose of an oxygen concentrator
Concentrate the oxygen in ambient air and eliminate other gases.
45.9
CPAP and how it facilitates effective breathing
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure decrease work of breathing by keeping the air passages and alveoli open during expiratory phase. Keeps airway pressure slightly higher than atmospheric pressure.
45.10
BiPAP
BiLevel Airway Pressure exerts different levels of inspiratory vs expiratory pressure.
45.10
tidal volume
Volume of air breath in and out during normal breath.
45.10
Side effects of positive pressure ventilation
Alters hymodynamic of the body decreasing venous return to the heart; the thoracic pump pulls blood back when pressure in the chest is less than atmospheric pressure. The pump is not as effective and cardiac output can drop.
45.11
Can a pt with a laryngectomy be bagged though the mouth and/or nose?
No the larynx has been removed, you must use the stoma.
45.11
The primary intervention consideration for tracheostomy tube pt
A surgical airway in which an opening is placed in the trachea below the cricoid ring. Airway management with basic techniques including opening, repositioning, and suctioning.
45.11 & 12
What should you do if the tracheostomy closes?
Intubate as usual, cover tracheostomy site with occlusive dressing to prevent air loss.
45.12
Considerations for the pt during cleaning the tracheostomy tube
Have the pt deep breath, and consider preoxygenating using ventilator.
45.13
Causes of cardiomyopathy
(A condition in which the heart muscle does not work at optimal level.) Primary cardiomyopathy cannot be traced to one cause but is linked to hypertension, coronary artery disease, and viral infections might combine.
Secondary cardiomyopathy can be traced to a single cause.
45.14
Key flag in cardiac deterioration in home heath care pt
A change in the previous level of activity.
45.14
Ways to minimize the risk of aspiration in the gastric tube pt
Pt should be upright, at least 30 degrees when medication or nutrition is being infused. They should ideally be kept upright for 30 to 60 minutes after feeding.
45.18
Common causes of large bowel obstruction (of colon)
A growth within the bowel rather than an adhesion that connects bowel or encircles another segment.
45.18
Causes of increased UTI in the chronic indwelling catheter pt
The bladder is usually sterile, so the introduction of a catheter introduces bacteria, however there is usually low risk of infection except in immunocompromised pts. Indwelling catheters keep sphincter open providing continuous route for bacteria.
45.19-20
Causes of shock in the indwelling catheter pt
Urosepsis is likely to cause septic shock due to ongoing risk of an infection.
45.20
iliostomy
Surgical procedure to remove large portions of the small intestine.
45.30
Ureterostomy
Surgically placed catheter into the bladder.
45.20
Most common sign of infection in the immunocompromised pt
Fever
45.23
Serous vs. purulent exudate
Exudate-drainage from a wound consist of fluid and cells.
Serous exudate is clear and water drainage.
Purulent exudate is pus, which consist of white blood cells, liquefied dead tissue, and bacteria.
45.23
Cases in which an apnea monitor is sent home with the infant
-Has unresolved apnea or prematurity at the time of hospital discharge.
-Has severe gastroesophageal reflux.
-Has a history of apparent life-threatening event.
-Is the sibling of a baby who suffer SIDS.

Tx stimulate, oxygenate, ventilate, and keep baby warm!
45.26
Causes of dementia
Alzheimer's disease, Pick disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. Some nutritional disorders, such as Wernicke disease or Korsakoff psychosis, also. Mostly the cause is unknown.
45.26 class
Locations of pain receptors in the body
All nociceptor (ie. pain receptors) begin as free nerve endings and end in the dorsal (ascending) roots of the spinal cord.
45.27
Side effects of chemotherapy
Alopecia (hair loss), anorexia, fatigue, leukopenia (decrease in WBC), thrombocytopenia (decrease in platelets), anemia, and increased risk of infections, along with N/V.
45.27