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48 Cards in this Set

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What does Operationalisation refer to?
Taking a meaningful but potentially illl-defined concept, such as Age, for example, and transforming it into a precise measurement.
What three aspects of measurement is Operationalisation concerned with? (hint WHV)
What precisely is being measured.
How will it be measured.
Values that the measurement can take need to be defined.
With reference to study design, what is a Theoretical Construct?
The thing to be measured, such as Age, for example.
What is a Measure?
The tool to be used to make observations, such as a survey, for example.
Define a Variable.
The data corresponding to the observations made using a given measure.
Measurement?
The process of applying a measure to obtain data (the variable).
Nominal variable
An unordered collection of values where there is no particular relationship between values. Co our, for example.
Ordinal variable?
The set of possible outcomes have some meaningful ordering but the differences, ratios between any two values lack meaning. Arrival order, for example.
Interval variable
Natural ordering of values exists where differences may be meaningfully interpreted, but the ratios may not as no logical zero exists. Date of birth, for example.
Ratio variable
Natural ordering exists between values. Both differences and ratios may be meaningfully interpreted. Eg. Age in years
Discrete variables
Categoric, no guarantee that for any two values there exists a value that lies in-between the two.
Continuous variable
Smoothly varying. For any two valid values, there is always a value that lies in-between the two.
Non parametric variables
Nominal and ordinal scale variables
Parametric variables
Interval and ratio scale variables
Predictors
Variables used to predict the value of other variables. Also known as independent variables.
Outcome variables
Variables to be explained in terms of predictors. Also known as dependent variables.
Reliability
CPR
Consistency
Precision
Repeatability
Validity
How accurate a measure is
Test retest reliability
Same measurement when retesting
Consistency over time
Inter tater reliability
Consistency of measurement across people conducting a rating activity
Parallel forms reliability
Two different but equivalent mechanisms produce the same answer
Internal consistency reliability
Do equivalent sub parts of a measure yield the same answer.
Characterize experimental design?
Researcher exercises complete control over all relevant factors
Limitation of experimental design?
Can be too artificial
Non experimental design?
Some factors are left uncontrolled
Quasi experimental
A non experimental technique because some predictor variables are left uncontrolled.
Can analyze results.
Case study.
A non experimental design where there is not enough data to analyze with formal statistical methods,
Internal validity
Does a study allow correct conclusions to be drawn regarding the causal relationships between predictor and outcome variables.
External validity
How generalizable are the results.
Construct validity
Does the measure appropriately capture the construct of interest.
Eg. Are you a racist?
Face validity
Does the study look like it should work prima facie.
Ecological validity
Does the environment in which the study is conducted resemble the environment it seeks to explain in relevant ways.
What form of validity does a confound threaten?
A confound threatens internal validity.
Describe a confound.
What is it?
Consequence?
Where more likely?
A confound is an unmeasured variable related to one or more predictors or outcomes.
It becomes difficult to understand the causal relationships between the predictors and outcomes.
Non experimental research more likely to have confounds.
What form of validity does an artifact threaten?
An artifact threatens external validity.
What is an artifact?
consequence?
Where more likely?
An artifact is where results apply in very limited circumstances.
Weakens genera usability of claims.
More likely in experimental design
History effect
Confound where specific events occurring mid study can affect the results
Maturational effect?
Confound where the change in a person (unrelated to a single specific event) during a study may affect the result.
Eg. Research on small children
Repeated testing effect
Confound where results affected due to:
Practice
Familiarity with environment
Auxiliary effect of experiment, eg. Boredom
Selection bias
Confound where the population of interest has been sampled in some way which affects the study outcome.
Differential attrition
Form of selection bias whereby people drop out of study in a way that affects results.
Heterogenous attrition
Drop out rate differs across experimental conditions
Non response bias
Confound relating to selection bias, where not everyone responds to a survey, or not all questions are answered, for example.
Regression to the mean?
A variation of selection bias. Occurs when selecting data based on extreme values of some measure.
Experimenter bias
Is the experimenter shaping the outcome of the experiment in some way. Clever Hans, for example.
Demand effects/reactivity?
An experimental artifact arising as a result of the fact that the participants knew that they were being studied. Studying worker productivity, for example.
Descriptive statistics
Used to describe the specific sample of data that you have
Inferential statistics
Using your data to make a claim about a broader population than the one from which your data was drawn.