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59 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
playwright
a writer who makes plays
Play
written to be performed by actors on a stage before an audience
drama
performance in a theater, actors take on roles, perform actions, speak dialogue written in a script
script
text of many plays
closet dramas
written to be read rather than performed
one-act play
enitre play takes place in a single location and unfolds in one action
acts
the main division of a full length play
scenes
when location changes or a new character enters
conventions
understood and accepted by audiences, familiar techniques
setting
single location
suspense
anxious uncertainty about what will happen nextt
exposition
provides the necessary background information about the characters and their circumstances
dialogue
verbal exchanges between characters
conflict
The struggle within the plot between opposing forces. The protagonist engages in the conflict with the antagonist, which may take the form of a character, society, nature, or an aspect of the protagonist’s personality. See also character, plot.
plot
author's arrangement of incidents in the play that gives the story a particular focus
subplot
secondary action that reinforces, or contrasts the main plot
protagonist
central character
antagonist
oppostion to the central character
stage direction
A playwright’s written instructions about how the actors are to move and behave in a play. They explain in which direction characters should move, what facial expressions they should assume, and so on. See also drama, script.
pyramidal pattern
divide the plot into three essential parts. The first part is the rising action, in which complication creates some sort of conflict for the protagonist. The second part is the climax, the moment of greatest emotional tension in a narrative, usually marking a turning point in the plot at which the rising action reverses to become the falling action. The third part, the falling action (or resolution) is characterized by diminishing tensions and the resolution of the plot’s conflicts and complications.
rising action
in which complication creates some sort of conflict for the protagonist
climax
the moment of greatest emotional tension in a narrative, usually marking a turning point in the plot at which the rising action reverses to become the falling action
crisis
turning point in the action of a story that has a powerful effect on the protagonist. Opposing forces come together decisively to lead to the climax of the plot
falling action
is characterized by diminishing tensions and the resolution of the plot’s conflicts and complications.
resolution
The conclusion of a plot’s conflicts and complications. The resolution, also known as the falling action, follows the climax in the plot. See also dénouement, plot.
conclusion or denouement
"unknotting",resolution
foil
character whose behaviors and values contrast with the protagonist
theme
central idea or meaning of the play
orchestra
"dancing place"
chorus
chanted lines and danced
skene
a stage buliding that serves as a dressing rooms
deus ex machina
"god from the machine", author provides a to easy resolution for story
prologue
opening speech or dialogue, usually give exposition nessasry for the following action
parodos
chorus, commentary on what the audience has learned
episodia
episodes, characters exchanges dialogues with heated debate
stasimon
chours responds and interprets proceeding dialogue
exodus
last scene, follows final episode
tragedy
presents courageous individuals who confront powerful forces within or outside themselves
hamartia
weakness
tragic flaw
excess pride, ambition, passion
hybris or hubris
overweening pride
catharsis
purging of emotions
reversal
hero's fortune truns and unexpected direction, change occurs
recognition
previously unknown information is revealed to the protagonist resulting in the dicovery of the truth
dramatic irony or tragic irony
creates a discrepancy between what a character believes or says and what the reader or audience member knows to be true.
mystery plays
dramatize stories from the bible, "Creation"
Miracle plays
based on the lives of saints
Morality plays
allegorical plays are thier to teach humanity how to achieve salvation
aside
spech directed only to the audience
soliloquy
speech directed only to the audiece
soliloquy
speech delieverd while an actor is alone on the stage
history play
British play
comedy
A work intended to interest, involve, and amuse the reader or audience, in which no terrible disaster occurs and that ends happily for the main characters. High comedy refers to verbal wit, such as puns, whereas low comedy is generally associated with physical action and is less intellectual. Romantic comedy involves a love affair that meets with various obstacles (like disapproving parents, mistaken identities, deceptions, or other sorts of misunderstandings) but overcomes them to end in a blissful union. Shakespeare’s comedies, such as A Midsummer Night’s Dream, are considered romantic comedies.
comic relief
humorous scene that alleviates tension
romantic comedies
lovers whose hearts are set on each other, but whose lives are complicated
satire
critical eye on vices, follies and holds for ridicule
high comedy
verbal wit
farce
A form of humor based on exaggerated, improbable incongruities.
Tragedy
A story that presents courageous individuals who confront powerful forces within or outside themselves with a dignity that reveals the breadth and depth of the human spirit in the face of failure, defeat, and even death. Tragedies recount an individual’s downfall; they usually begin high and end low. Shakespeare is known for his tragedies, including Macbeth, King Lear, Othello, and Hamlet. The revenge tragedy is a well-established type of drama that can be traced back to Greek and Roman plays, particularly through the Roman playwright Seneca (c. 3 b.c.–a.d. 63