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66 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
Angioedema
An allergic skin disease characterized by parches of swelling in the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, and the mucous membranes. Also called angioneurotic edema or giant urticaria.
Annular
A ring shaped lesion with central clearing.
Blackhead
One of the primary lesions of acne. A darkened area of sebum and keratin. Also called an open comedo.
Cafe-au-lait Spots
Pigmented brown lesions.
Cellulitis
Inflammation of the subcutaneous tissues caused by bacteria.
Confluent
Connected together.
Cream
A topical dosage form that consists of an O/W or a W/O emulsion.
Dermatitis
Inflammation of the skin.
Desquamation
Peeling of the skin in the form of scales.
Ecchymosis
A blue or purple hemorrhagic patch on the skin.
Eczema
A superficial inflammatory of the skin characterized by itching, redness, oozing, weeping, crusting, and later scaling.
Emollient
An agent that softens and smoothes the skin.
Erythema
Redness
Exanthem
An eruptive disease such as measles
Fibroma
A tumor that consists mainly of fibrous tissue
Guttate
Drop-like
Humectant
An agent that provides moisture to the skin
Impetigo
A superficial infection of the skin.
Lentigo
A pigmented macule of the skin.
Lesion
A wound, injury or a pathologic change in the tissues of the skin.
Macerate
To soften by wetting or soaking.
Margination
The transition zone between normal and abnormal skin. Usually stated to be sharp or diffuse
Morbilliform
Measles-like; maculopapular lesions that become confluent on the face and the body.
Nits
The eggs of head lice.
Ointment
A greasy-feeling topical dosage form comprised primarily of hydrocarbons.
Palpable
Capable of being felt.
Pruritus
Localized or generalized itching.
Purpura
A purple papule resulting from hemorrhage into the tissues of the skin.
Seborrhea
Excess secretion of sebum.
Sebum
A substance consisting of fatty acids, glycerides, and epithelial debris secreted by the sebaceous gland. Sebum waterproofs the skin.
Telanglectasia
Dilation of small groups of blood vessels
Urticaria
A skin condition characterized by wheals and itching. Usually caused by an allergic reaction.
Whitehead
One of the primary lesions of acne. A superficial pustule. Also called a closed comedo.
Xerosis
Dryness
Lesion
single, small area of skin disease
rash
presence of many lesions. Also called "eruption"
Macule
A flat, non-palpable, circumscribed lesion less than 1.5cm in diameter demarked by a color change. Ex: freckles, vitiligo, pigmentation
Patch
A macule that is larger than 1.5cm in diamter.
Papule
An elevated, solid, sometimes inflmmatory lump of less than 1.5cm in diamter. Ex: warts
Nodule
A palpule enlarged in 3 directions: length, height and width. solid lesion usually more than 1.5cm in diameter. May involve the epidermis, dermis or hypodermis.
Tumor
A solid, palpable lesion that is greater than 2cm in diamter. The difference between a nodule and a tumor is not readily defined except that a tumor is usually a synonym for a neoplasm. Maybe deep in dermis, but not always. Usually refers to a malignant lesion.
Plaque
A palpable but relatively flat, rough, plateau-like, scaly lesion with a diameter of greater than 1.5cm. It is usually greater in area than in thickness. May arise from papules that join together. Ex: psoriasis & chronic atopic dermatitis
Vesicle
An elevated fluid-filled papule. A small blister that is less than 1.5cm in diameter. Filled with clear, thin fluid. Ex: herpes simplex & chicken pox
Bulla
A large vesicle greater than 1.5cm in diameter. May develop through the coalescence of multiple small vesicles.
Wheal
An elevated irregular-shaped area of cutaneous edema. Substance of lesions consists of interstitial non-loculated fluid. Transient lesions lasting less than 24 hrs. Usually caused by an allergic reaction. Ex: hives.
Pustule
An elevated lesion, less than 1cm in diameter that is filled with pus. Bacteria almost always cause this type of lesion.
Cyst
A nodule with an epithelial-lined central cavity that is filled with fluid or semi-solid material. Lesions feel like an eyeball.
Petechiae
Red-purple non-blanchable discolorations of the skin. Less than 0.5cm in diameter. Usually caused by bleeding into the skin.
Purpura
Red-purple non-blanchable discolorations of the skin. Large petechiae. Larger than 0.5cm. Caused by deposits of blood or blood pigment in the skin.
Ecchymoses
Red-purple non-blanchable discolorations of the skin. Very large petechiae. Deposit of blood or blood pigment in the skin. Caused by vascular wall destruction. Older patients get red marks where you try to put IVS. Capillary fragility, ruptures for reasons we don't understand.
Abscess
A pustule that is larger than 1cm in diameter
Furuncle
A pustule that forms in the hair follicle.
Carbuncle
A cluster of furuncles.
Scale
Dry, small thin flakes of epidermal debris. Heaped-up, shedding, dead epidermal cells. Derives from the outer layer of the epidermis. Scales may be dry or greasy such as in dandruff.
Erosion
Loss of part of the epidermis; follows rupture of a vesicle or bulla. Erosion does not pass basal cell layer.
Ulcer
A complete loss of the epidermis with exposure of the dermis. Deep ulcers can result in the destruction of the dermis as well. Deeper into the skin than an erosion. Heal with scaring. Stasis ulcer. Cutaneous anthrax.
Fissure
Linear crack in the epidermis that may extend into the dermis. Any split in the epidermis extending into the papillary dermis.
Crust
Scab. An accumulation of dried transudate and cellular debris that may form over a primary lesion. Ex: impetigo
Atrophy
Thinning of the skin surface and loss of skin markings; skin becomes paper-like and translucent.
Scar
Thin to thick fibrous tissue that replaces normal skin following an injury to the dermis. Are initially thick and pink.
Keloids
Hypertropic scars. Form beyond the borders of the original injury. More common in Asian and African-Americans than Cucasians.
Excoriation
Loss of the epidermis secondary to scratching; a linear hollowed-out crusted area. Superficial linear abrasions of the skin. Usually caused by scratching.
Lichenification
A change in the texture of the skin surface that results from frictional rubbing. The skin appears thickened and rough. Surface looks like a washboard.
Transudate
A thin straw-colored fluid that escapes for the surface of superficially abraded skin.
Burrow
Very small tunnels into the epidermis. Caused by parasites such as scabies. Tunnels can be short or can be very long such as in a disease called creeping eruption. Usually found in webs of fingers.
Spider Angioma
Red central body with radiating central legs. Blanch with pressure to the central body. Caused by severe liver disease and vitamin B deficiency.