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17 Cards in this Set

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Criminal Law
Criminal matters involve a question of guilt. "Is the defendant guilty of committing a criminal act?" In all criminal actions, the government must take the role of plaintiff. That is why criminal matters are titled "State v. Smith" or "The People v. Jones."
The difference is the amount of prison time that is served.
Misdemeanor and Felony
Counsel
Attorney, lawyer, and counsel all mean the same thing.
Does Attorney, lawyer, and counsel all mean the same thing.
Yes
Nolle Prosequi
(Pronounced: no-lay pross-eh-kwee)
this is typically used when the prosecutor thinks the Defendant has suffered enough.
no-pro short for
Nolle Prosequi
(Pronounced: no-lay pross-eh-kwee)
True
Nolo Contendere
(Pronounced: no-lo con-tend-ray)
no contest
used often as part of plea bargains
Nolo Contendere
(Pronounced: no-lo con-tend-ray) or no contest,
Probable Cause
a valid and at least reasonable suspicion that a criminal act has been committed
To get a search warrant, police must establish probable cause.
True
To file charges, the prosecutor must have probable cause.
True
It is the standard for going forward with any criminal legal action.
Probable Cause
Grand Jury
an investigative panel called by the prosecutor to determine whether criminal charges should be filed against a potential defendant.
Acquit
A judge or jury may acquit the defendant by finding him/her not guilty.
Double Jeopardy
The criminal equivalent of res judicata
Acquit
A judge or jury may acquit the defendant by finding him/her not guilty.
Double Jeopardy
The criminal equivalent of res judicata