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338 Cards in this Set

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They lead adherence to the Navy Standard through personal example and commitment to teaching their Sailors.
First Line Leadership
They must challenge, mentor and measure their division's and command's
success through team performance and deckplate results.
First Line Leadership
First Class Petty Officers are developing experts who learn
from their Chief and train their Division
Rating Expertise
They demand consistent procedural
compliance and accuracy from themselves and those they lead
Rating Expertise
First Class Petty Officers are the Navy's first line professionals who execute the right things at the right time for the right reasons.
Professionalism
Integrity governs all their actions from leadership through watchstanding and is the foundation upon which consistent mission accomplishment is built .
Professionalism
Their commitment to our profession is seen through dedicated self improvement and a passion for excellence in themselves and all Sailors.
Professionalism
First Class Petty Officers clearly communicate standards to
the Sailors they lead, while consistently keeping the chain of command informed
Communication
The Deckplate triad of Division Officer, CPO and First Class Petty Officer is only effective with their input and deck plate perspective.
Communication
First Class Petty Officers are visibly loyal to the command, Sailors, peers
and themselves.
Loyalty
They utilize opportunities to provide feedback and actively support
guidance.
Loyalty
They create circumstances which give their Sailors the opportunity to
succeed
Loyalty
First Class Petty Officers are proud of our shared history.
Heritage
They take opportunities to weave it into daily events, so our Sailors understand that a commitment to excellence is a time-honored tradition that connects our past while forging the foundation of our future.
Heritage
What does RAA stand for?
Responsibility, Accountability, and Authority
"I will bear true faith and allegiance ... "
Honor
"I will support and defend ... "
Courage
"I will obey the orders ... "
Commitment
What NAVEDTRA covers Military Requirements for Petty Officer First Class?
NAVEDTRA 14145
What OPNAVINST covers Standard Organization and Regulations of the
U.S. Navy?
OPNAVINST 3120.32
The responsibility of leadership may be viewed as "That for which one is
answerable; a duty or trust" is what type of Responsibility?
Leadership Responsibility
includes the ability to meet obligations or act without senior authority or
guidance. It may be responsibility delegated to the petty officer or inherent in a billet, primary or collateral duty, watch station, or may be directly related to being a Navy petty officer.
Leadership Responsibility
All Sailors have the immediate responsibility to perform their assigned tasks and duties to the best of their abilities and to conform to the standards of the Navy.
Internal Responsibility
An excellent method to maintain accountability through effective feedback.
Counseling
Defined as instruction in a phase of military duty in which an individual is deficient
EMI
Intended to correct a deficiency
EMI
It is an administrative measure and
must not be used as a substitute for punitive action appropriate under
the UCMJ.
EMI
When punitive action does not appear appropriate.
Withholding of Privileges
Formal proceedings are usually initiated using the Report and Disposition of
Offense(s)
Report Chit
Direct the processes and rights of the accused for courts martial.
Manual for Courts Martial.
Used by some commands as a part of the administrative process for handling report chits
DRB
Usually consists of a panel of senior enlisted Sailors of the command who review cases after the First Line Leader's chain of command has investigated the report
DRB
Makes recommendations to the Executive Officer (XO), prior to the
Executive Officer's Inquiry (XOI) as to the disposition of the case
DRB
The lowest form of punishment in the Navy
NJP or Captain's Mast
(1) Self-Discipline
(2) Competence
(3) Commitment
(4) Pride
Characteristics of Professionalism
They practice ethical standards and conduct and exercise accountability for themselves and subordinates.
Self-Discipline
Sailors are tactically proficient, leaders of people, and maintain high standards.
Competence
Sailors display a continued commitment to service for their work and team.
Commitment
They pay attention to their appearance/dress, have a positive
attitude, and are respectful toward others.
Pride
They are also dedicated to self-improvement.
Pride
Used by some commands as a part of the administrative process for handling report chits
DRB
Usually consists of a panel of Senior Enlisted Sailors of the command who review cases after the First Line Leader's chain of command has investigated the report
DRB
Makes recommendations to the Executive Officer (XO), prior to the
Executive Officer's Inquiry (XOI) as to the disposition of the case
DRB
The lowest form of punishment in the Navy
NJP or Captain's Mast
(1) Self-Discipline
(2) Competence
(3) Commitment
(4) Pride
Characteristics of Professionalism
They practice ethical standards and conduct and exercise accountability for themselves and subordinates.
Self-Discipline
Sailors are tactically proficient, leaders of people, and maintain high
standards.
Competence
Sailors display a continued commitment to service for their work and team.
Commitment
They pay attention to their appearance/dress, have a positive
attitude, and are respectful toward others.
Pride
They are also dedicated to self-improvement.
Pride
Influence the effectiveness of our leadership, and ultimately our mission effectiveness.
Ethics, values, and morals
Are standards of conduct that indicate how one (or a group) should
behave, based on a set of moral principles or a system of values
Ethics
Are principles, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile by an
individual or a group
Values
Reflect a more personal conviction than values and relate to principles of
right and wrong behavior
Morals
Are situations that require a choice between equally unfavorable or
mutually exclusive options
Dilemmas
How many methods of Aligning Values, exist?
5
Know the Navy's policy. Support, train, and practice the values.
Methods of Aligning Values
Recognize your position as a leader and a role model. "Walk the talk," knowing your actions influence others.
Methods of Aligning Values
Practice consistent and continuous principle-based system of values. Make not only the right decision, but lead your people to do the right thing as well.
Methods of Aligning Values
Be concerned with, and responsible for, the well being of those in your charge. Be universally fair to all, regardless of the situation.
Methods of Aligning Values
Accept the challenge and live a values-based lifestyle
Methods of Aligning Values
The collective opinions of people within a command about how the command and work force operate
Definition of Command Climate
What drives day-to-day activities, actions, and behaviors.
Command Climate
Pride and teamwork are evident throughout the command, when what is observed?
Command Climate
Co-worker relationships, awards/recognition, meaningful work,
equipment and furnishings,
Why Command Climate is important
Leaders need to be attentive to the dynamics they can positively influence.
Elements of Command Climate
People, relationships, and activities are key elements to what?
Elements of Command Climate
You may want to encourage competition against standards rather than each other
Work Factors in the Elements of a Command Climate
Establish high, attainable, clearly understood standards within your command structure
Work Factors in the Elements of a Command Climate
Standard Organization & Regulations of the Navy (SORN), and Uniform Code
of Military Justice (UCMJ)), and ensure practices are consistently applied.
Policies and Standards in the Elements of a Command Climate
P01 should provide Sailors with a sense of belonging and selfworth
through ongoing feedback
Personal Excellence in the Elements of a Command Climate
Establishing direction, aligning, motivating and inspiring people.
Leadership processes
Institutionalizing a leadership centered culture
Leadership processes
Planning and budgeting, organizing and staffing, controlling and problem solving
Management processes
Process improvement.
Management processes
May result in short-term focus, rigidity, and lack of motivation.
STRONG MANAGEMENT W/weak leadership
May result in inefficiency, even loss of ability to accomplish tasking.
STRONG LEADERSHIP W/weak management
Defined as the ability to get the job done, oversee the work process,
and coordinate organizational efforts toward task accomplishment.
SUPERVISION
Elements of both leadership and management.
SUPERVISORY SKILLS
A management tool, which is critical to the success of a Petty Officer First Class (P01)
EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
Verbal and written communications are critical in performing well on the job
EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
Establishing direction, aligning, motivating and inspiring people.
Leadership processes
Institutionalizing a leadership centered culture
Leadership processes
Planning and budgeting, organizing and staffing, controlling and problem solving
Management processes
Process improvement.
Management processes
May result in short-term focus, rigidity, and lack of motivation.
STRONG MANAGEMENT W/weak leadership
May result in inefficiency, even loss of ability to accomplish tasking.
STRONG LEADERSHIP W/weak management
Defined as the ability to get the job done, oversee the work process,
and coordinate organizational efforts toward task accomplishment.
SUPERVISION
Elements of both leadership and management.
SUPERVISORY SKILLS
A management tool, which is critical to the success of a Petty Officer First Class (P01)
EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
Verbal and written communications are critical in performing well on the job
EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
How many key elements are found in Proper Communication?
5
The person who is initiating the message is called what?
Sender
The content and purpose of the communication is called what?
Message
The intended recipient(s) of the sender's message is called what?
Receiver
May be voice, telephone, radio, Internet, e-mail, etc. is called what?
Transmission medium
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Looking at Wrist watch
Impatient has more important things to do
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Arms Crossed
Resistant to other person's message
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Arms on hips
Impatient
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Rolling eyes
Not taking other person's message seriously
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Looking at feet or floor
Humble, Subservient, lacks confidence
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Eyes glazing over
Possible Interpretation: Has abandoned the conversation
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Nodding head up & down
Possible Interpretation: In agreement with what is said
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Stroking Chin
Possible Interpretation: Engaged in thought; listening attentively
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Saluting
Possible Interpretation: Recognizing existence; showing respect
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Cupping hand behind ear
Possible Interpretation: Trouble receiving the message say again
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Wringing hands
Possible Interpretation: Nervousness or anxiety
Specific Nonverbal Gesture: Stabbing air with finger
Possible Interpretation: Making an important point
What is the current knowledge, skill level, and nature of the need to communicate in the first place?
The fifth factor in effective communication.
Writing style and use of acronyms and jargon should be tailored to the _____?
Audience
The point must be made quickly, refers to the?
Subject
Know what your writing sounds like, and make use of that knowledge to get your message across, refers to the?
Writer
Put the most important sentence in by the end of the Where?
First paragraph
Always place: Requests before
Justifications.
Answers before
Explanations.
Conclusions before
Discussions
Summaries before
Details
General before
Specific.
What type of paragraphs should you use?
Short
What type of sentences should you write?
Disciplined
What of pronouns should you use?
Personal
Are contractions OK to use when writing naval correspondence?
Yes
What length of sentence is recommended for Naval Correspondence?
Short
Should you repeat general ideas to increase clarity?
No
What nouns should be avoided?
noun forms by eliminating "-ion" and "-ment."
What type of abbreviation should be avoided?
Excessive
What type of verbs should be avoided?
Passive verbs.
What is the etiquette governing communication on the Internet and E-mail?
Netiquette
What will guarantee reduced effectiveness from peers?
Confusion or Mixed messages
Exists whenever two or more parties disagree.
Conflict
What may be the greatest barrier to satisfaction and success as a supervisor?
Inability to handle conflict
What percent of time do managers spend in resolving conflicts?
20%
What are dissimilar values, biases, fear and unrealistic expectations?
Conflict from Internal factors
What type of conflict promotes change by raising problems, and encouraging better solutions?
Constructive or productive
(a) Clarification of important issues
(b) Increased involvement of team members
(c) Broadened individual or group perspectives
Where Constructive conflict comes from
(1) More direct communication
(2) Increased personal and group knowledge
(3) Positive release of emotion, anxiety, and stress
Constructive conflict results
Reduces cooperation and teamwork
Destructive conflict
Brings about hostility, and undermines the system as well as the people within it.
Destructive conflict
(a) Functional loyalties that impede cooperation
(b) Value, goal, or methodology differences
(c) Power or status seeking;
(d) Failure to take individual responsibility
Destructive conflict
(a) Interpersonal or intra-group hostility
(b) Diversion from important issues
(c) Delayed or sub-optimal decision making
(d) Dysfunctional behavior
(e) Low morale
Destructive conflict
Refusal to cooperate, verbal attacks, sabotage of projects
Examples of the behavior typical of destructive conflict
Talking behind an other's back to uninvolved people to gain support for one's position.
Examples of the behavior typical of destructive conflict
Purposely missing deadlines, and making deliberate errors in one's work
Examples of the behavior typical of destructive conflict
These people only worry about having their own needs met and do not care much about others' needs, concerns or impact on the other party to the conflict.
Win-Lose/Competing
These people always give others what they want without speaking their minds, they place the opponent's interests above his or her own
Lose-Win/Accommodating
These people are avoiders, as they neither stand up for their own needs, nor make sure others are happy; they just retreat and avoid the
issue by withdrawing or suppressing the conflict.
Lose-Lose/Avoiding
These people see the benefits to conflict and work toward a solution that will fully satisfy the needs, concerns and desires of all parties
Win-Win/Collaborating
Sometimes mistakenly seen as collaboration, compromise means
all parties involved give up a part of what they want.
Compromise
Well when the conflict is trivial
When avoiding works
When emotions are running high and time is needed to cool down
When avoiding works
When the potential disruption from a more assertive action outweighs the benefits of a resolution.
When avoiding works
When a quick resolution on important issues is needed
When competing works
When unpopular actions must be taken
When competing works
When commitment by others to the solution is not critical
When competing works
The ability to persuade others to your perspective
Influencing
Requires building good working relationships through strong impersonal and communication skills.
Influencing
It is necessary for both sides to discuss possible solutions
Negotiating
Set the agenda
Negotiation techniques
Establish your goals
Negotiation technique
Know your wants and needs
Negotiation technique
Do not confuse your goals with the issue
Negotiation technique
Mutual protection is better than mutual destruction
Negotiation technique
Relationships are important
Negotiation techniques
Avoid trying to exercise power or controlling the process of negotiations
Negotiation techniques
Do not stereotype
Negotiation techniques
Do not bargain against yourself
Negotiation techniques
Identify interference
Negotiation techniques
Seek a settlement
Negotiation techniques
Be proactive, not reactive
Negotiation techniques
Be flexible
Negotiation techniques
Ignore the conflict.
Team Conflict Management Options: Do nothing (non-intervention)
What is the off-line conversation (minimal intervention) Team Conflict Management Options consist of?
Team Conflict Management Options: Off-line conversation (minimal intervention)
Talk about issues in a generic sense before the meeting (tied into "ground rules") or at the end of the meeting as part of the meeting evaluation.
Team Conflict Management options: Impersonal group time (low intervention)
Provide feedback to the individuals involved with a more directive style. Seek an agreement for change in behavior.
Team Conflict Management options: Off-line confrontation (medium intervention)
As a last resort, the leader might have to deal with conflict during the meeting itself
Team Conflict Management options: In-group confrontation (high intervention)
The group members explore the parameters of what is acceptable
Forming Stage
Excitement, optimism, and anticipation often mix with feelings of anxiety about
the uncertainties ahead
Forming Stage
Non-genuine, "Plastic" smiles
Only a few talking or nervous chatter
Signs of Forming Stage
Who's who in the room?
Why are we here?
How do I fit in?
Issues of concern in the Forming Stage
Includes a period of adjustment in which group members resist collaborating with each other due to differences in attitude, preferences,
experience levels
Storming stage
Members engage in selling rather
than listening Ideology outweighs facts
Tendency to premature voting
Environment feels hostile
Signs of Storming stage
How can I protect my own area?
How can I get what I want/need?
How can I influence this group?
Issues of concern in the Storming stage
End of the period of personal adjustment and conflict, and the beginning of a period of equilibrium in which group members begin to think in terms of team-centered task definition and accomplishment.
Norming Stage
More active participation
Hidden agendas being revealed
Sub-groups forming
Leaders emerging
Signs of Norming Stage
What are we to accomplish?
How will we accomplish our work?
Who will be responsible for what?
Issues of concern in the Norming Stage
The team members roll up their sleeves and get to work.
Performing stage
They now define and solve problems as a cohesive group
Performing stage
Take proactive approaches, which involve the abilities and experience of each member
Performing stage
Mutually shared belief that all efforts are contributing to the larger organization's mission.
Performing stage
All group members share a common sense of purpose
Information is shared openly and efficiently
Signs of the Performing Stage
How can we prevent rather than
fix problems?
How can we do our jobs better,
quicker, and more efficiently?
Concerns of the Performing Stage
Generally confined to the boundaries within a functional (operational)
area, under one supervisor's control.
Functional -Composition
Organized by process (across functions) with a systems view.
Cross-functional teams foster open communication, promote cooperation, provide for more creative ideas, and discourage we/they thinking.
Cross-Functional/Composition
This type of team attacks a problem and then disbands.
Ad hoc/Duration
The life of this type of team is indefinite
Standing/Duration
Is concerned with how to get the job done under the constraints of policies, resources, or systems.
A Self-managed Team-Leadership
Has someone telling it how to get the job done under the constraints of policies, resources, or systems
A Managed Team-Leadership
Assigning to others specific tasks and the authority (power) to complete those tasks
Delegation
Used to give your subordinate a growth opportunity and strengthen organization
Delegation
Setting standards
Actions that leaders take to ensure that the job is done right
Assigning task and schedules
Actions that leaders take to ensure that the job is done right
Following up to ensure task have been accomplished
Actions that leaders take to ensure that the job is done right
Giving feedback regarding goal attainment.
Actions that leaders take to ensure that the job is done right
Matters requiring minimal coordination
Tasks that can be delegated
Routine, ongoing matters
Tasks that can be delegated
Tasks involving technical knowledge
Tasks that can be delegated
Matters covered by detailed procedures or policies
Tasks that can be delegated
Projects with clearly defined results
Tasks that can be delegated
Personal and confidential matters
Tasks that should not be delegated
Policy-making
Tasks that should not be delegated
Crisis
Tasks that should not be delegated
Development of subordinates
Tasks that should not be delegated
Assignments a superior asked you to complete personally
Tasks that should not be delegated
It involves, among other things, monitoring individuals during the
performance of their duties, observing their interactions
Direct observation
It is limited to the present situation, and reflects only the opinion of the observer.
The downside of direct observation
Third party opinions and any other data that has been compiled about a subordinate.
Indirect observation
limitations are that the data may be out of date or flawed in some
other way
Downside of Indirect observation
To get the job done
Possible goals or outcomes from the delegation process
To enhance professional development in a subordinate
Possible goals or outcomes from the delegation process
To provide an opportunity to evaluate a subordinate's development or
commitment
Possible goals or outcomes from the delegation process
Includes monitoring processes and procedures to evaluate their ongoing effectiveness in meeting operational goals
Continuous Improvement
Increase in knowledge and skills on the work environment team
Continuous Improvement
Processes are completed with greater speed, accuracy, or both
Continuous Improvement
The creative problem solving of team members enhances new or better ways to accomplish tasks
Continuous Improvement
Analyze and plan tasks to be delegated by prioritizing what must be done
Effective Delegation
Monitor task execution by following up on schedule.
Effective Delegation
Provide feedback that balances the work environment's goals and the
subordinates' need for personal and professional growth.
Effective Delegation
Are psychological barriers that individuals use to excuse the fact
that they do not delegate well
Internal barriers
Initially, most subordinates are not fast or efficient,
"I can do it better."- Barriers to Delegation
Prevents delegation because the delegation process becomes delayed and, suddenly, there is not enough time to teach, train, or monitor.
"I don't have enough time."- Barriers to Delegation
Protecting your position as the expert or the individual with all the knowledge is a common phenomenon.
"I secretly fear that my subordinates will outshine me."- Barriers to Delegation
Supervisors who have low self-esteem or lack confidence in their abilities
"I secretly fear that my subordinates will outshine me."- Barriers to Delegation
Lack of confidence in subordinates may say more about your ability to train
them than about their abilities to learn
"I lack confidence in my people." -Barriers to Delegation
"If I don't do this right I will be punished for making mistakes"
Fear of punishment-Barriers to Delegation
Clearly stated expectations and supportive feedback can reduce this fear.
Solutions to Fear of punishment-Barriers to Delegation.
Delegation can be confused with "dumping,"
Concern with work overload-Barriers to Delegation
Clear communication of expectations, goals, and objectives
Solutions for Concern with work overload-Barriers to Delegation
The result of leadership actions to create an environment of trust and
mutual respect.
Empowerment
Helps employees get the job done
Empowering leader
Challenges assumptions
Empowering leader
Encourages risk and experimentation
Empowering leader
Delegates authority and responsibility
Empowering leader
Fosters a learning environment
Empowering leader
Promotes shared information
Empowering leader
Collaborative problem solving
Empowering leader
Models behavior - "walks the talk"
Empowering leader
Appreciates diversity of style and behavior
Empowering leader
Is essential to the successful accomplishment of assigned tasks and, ultimately, the command mission.
Effective planning
Develops a shared understanding of the common direction
Purpose of Planning
Coordinates efforts of people working together
Purpose of Planning
Facilitates decision making
Purpose of Planning
Establishes control and measurement
Purpose of Planning
Also called action plans
Short-Range Plans
This type of planning includes monthly and quarterly training plans, quarterly budget plans, and Plan of Action & Milestones
Mid-Range Plans
Are not constrained by time and are cyclical and continuous.
Long-Range Plans
Conscious documentation of where you are going
Mission (Purpose)
Provide a means to achieve the plan's
purpose.
Goals and Objectives
The targets, toward which an organization strives for
Goals and Objectives
Strategies are implemented to achieve the objective.
Goals and Objectives
Mission, Goals and Objectives,Implementation, Monitoring, Evaluation, and Correction are?
Elements of a Plan
Planning involves selecting the methods of achieving the desired end.
Implementation
Includes observation and collection of data to ascertain the progress of the plan
Monitoring
Provides the validation of whether the plan is working or needs to be
revised.
Evaluation
The observations and data collected are considered to determine the degree of success of the plan
Evaluation
Involves reassessing the actions needed to meet stated goals
Correction
Problem Solving, Decision Making, Risk Management
Three Important Concepts to Apply When Planning
Define the problem
Problem Solving
Look for potential causes for the problem
Problem Solving
Devise a plan to solve the problem
Problem Solving
Identify alternative solutions to the problem
Problem Solving
Select the best solution to the problem
Problem Solving
Define the problem
Decision Making
Collect and analyze data
Decision Making
Weigh alternatives and risk
Decision Making
Test possible solutions
Decision Making
Arrive at a course of action
Decision Making
Making decisions to reduce risk to acceptable levels, and taking actions
to minimize risk associated with the operation.
Risk Management (OPNAVINST 3500.39 (series))
The different characteristics and attributes of individual Sailors and
civilians that enhance the mission readiness of the Navy.
Diversity
Equal Opportunity and Treatment is what article?
Article 1164
What is the Instruction that gives the guidelines of how you are evaluated?
BUPERINST 1610.10
Standards are clear and consistent.
Evaluation Standards
Standards are realistic and high.
Evaluation Standards
Positive and negative feedback is frequently given.
Evaluation Standards
Performance problems are handled quickly and appropriately.
Evaluation Standards
All levels participate in enforcing standards
Evaluation Standards
Are measurable results, quantities, quality, and accomplishments.
Objective Factors of Evaluation Reports
Include opinions, such as those about attitude, personality,
and adaptability.
Subjective Factors of Evaluation Reports
Can be evaluated if they are supported by documented incidents.
Subjective Factors of Evaluation Reports
They are constantly monitoring how well things are going, and watching for problems that may arise.
Supervision of a Subordinate.
What instruction ensure that the member understands the supervisor's expectations?
BUPERSINST 1610.10
EVALUATION REPORT & COUNSELING RECORD (EI-E6) is written on?
NAVPERS 1626/26
"A physical, chemical, or emotional factor that causes bodily
or mental tension" is called?
Stress
Resulting from fears and anxieties
Emotional stressors
Resulting from interactions with family members
Family stressors
Resulting from the tensions and pressures we experience at
work
Work stressors
These are instinctive bodily reactions to stress.
Physiological/Physical response to stress
Unless a person consciously intervenes, these occur automatically, outside your control.
Physiological/Physical response to stress
They provide dependable, instant feedback that enables you to decide if action is necessary and appropriate.
Physiological/Physical response to stress
Examples include: perspiration, rapid breathing, flushed face, and trembling knees.
Physiological/Physical response to stress
These responses are instinctive, conditioned, and learned.
Psychological/Emotional response to stress
They include: fear, apprehension, worry, anxiety.
Psychological/Emotional response to stress.
Responses include actions and habits developed in response to stress, such as spilling coffee, clumsiness, or habits such as smoking, drinking, and drug use.
Behavioral response to stress.
Affects the way people think and feel.
Stress
Also suspected to aggravate chronic backache, arthritis, allergies, dermatitis, and vertigo
Physical Effects of Stress
Depression, hopelessness, and helplessness.
Mental Effects of Stress
Major contributor to hypertension and coronary disease, migraine and
tension headaches, ulcers, and asthma.
Stress
Extreme reluctance to go to work each day
Job Burnout
A profound sense of failure
Job Burnout
Anger and resentment
Job Burnout
Depression, low morale, feeling of hopelessness (may lead to
suicide)
Job Burnout
Intense fatigue, even on waking
Job Burnout
Loss of confidence and low self-esteem
Job Burnout
Sleeping and eating disorders
Job Burnout
Increased consumption of cigarettes, alcohol, or drugs
Job Burnout
Increased frequency of colds and flu, headaches
Job Burnout
They are what you bring to the picture from your personality and past experiences.
Personal Perceptions
Perceptions relate to what we read into stress indicators or stressful circumstances.
Personal Perceptions
Methods to manage disagreement and reduce stress for both parties
include (1st possibility)
Maintain mutual respect
Methods to manage disagreement and reduce stress for both parties
include (2nd possibility)
Search for common ground
Methods to manage disagreement and reduce stress for both parties
include (3rd possibility)
Pursue creative compromise
Methods to manage disagreement and reduce stress for both parties
include (4th possibility)
Actively listen
Methods to manage disagreement and reduce stress for both parties
include (5th possibility)
Let go of having to be right
Methods to manage disagreement and reduce stress for both parties
include (6th possibility)
Seek win-win solutions
Stress management techniques (1st possibility)
Maintain composure
Stress management techniques (2nd possibility)
Regroup organization of personnel, procedures, and administration
Stress management techniques (3rd possibility)
Identify the situation
Stress management techniques (4th possibility)
Get resolution
Stress management techniques (5th possibility)
Take action
Enthusiasm, pride, and positive attitude describe what emotion?
Motivation
Working toward the shared goals of the work environment or team
Direction
Using a large majority of their energy in this goal-oriented direction
Intensity
Working toward these shared goals consistently over time
Persistence
The inner desire to engage one's interests and exercise
one's capabilities.
Intrinsic motivation
Provides a natural force that encourages self-development and personal growth.
Intrinsic motivation
The act is rewarding for its own sake.
Intrinsic Motivation
Occurs when external rewards direct behaviors into specific patterns.
Extrinsic Motivation
Individuals act in certain ways as a means of getting something else.
Extrinsic Motivation
They read and study to get an "A" or pass a test, not just for the joy of learning
Extrinsic Motivation