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32 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
REBT
What and who?
Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy
Developed by: Dr. Albert Ellis in 1955
Spawned other Cognitive Behavioral Therapies
REBT
Four Key Ideas
Responsible for your actions.
Dysfunctional behaviors product of irrational thinking.
Can learn more realistic views
Deeper acceptance of self w/ a reality-based perspective.
REBT
Two Types of Problems
Practical Problems
Emotional Problems
REBT
Four Steps
1. Take responsibility for your distress
2. Identify your musts
3. Disbute your musts
4. Reinforce your preferences
REBT
4 "musts"
Demands on:
1. self (anxiety, depression, victimization)
2. others (resentment, hostility, violence)
3. situation (hopelessness, procrasitnation, addictions)
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
Eight categories
Extroversion Introversion
Sensing iNtuition
Thinking Feeling
Judging Perceiving
Life Stage Model
Who and When
Super
1990
Life Stage Model
Five Stages
Growth, Exploration, Establishment, Maintenance, and Disengagement
Archway Model
Who and When?
Super
1990
Archway Model
Parts of the Archway
Doorstep = history/biography
Columns = society, psychological
Archway = Career
Holland
6 Types
Realistic
Investigative
Artistic
Social
Enterprising
Conventional
Holland
Social
The S type usually has social skills, is interested in human relationships, and likes to help others with problems.
Holland
Realistic
The R type usually has mechanical and athletic abilities, enjoys working outdoors, and likes to work with tools and machines
Holland
Investigative
The I type usually has mathematical and scientific abilities, enjoys working alone, enjoys research, and likes to solve problems.
Holland
Artistic
The A type usually has artistic skills, enjoys creating original work, and has a good imagination.
Holland
Enterprising
The E type usually has leadership and speaking abilities, is interested in economics and politics, and likes to be influential.
Holland
Conventional
The C type enjoys working with words and numbers.C type conforming, practical, careful, etc.
Ginzberg Theory
fantasy stage: 10-12
tentative period: 12-17
realistic period:17-20
reduce options and make compromise.
Trait-Factor Theory
Who and When
Frank Parsons 1909
Trait-Factor Theory
What
Match your skills (traits) to the demands (factors) or a profession to make a good career choice.
Johari's Window
4 Windows
picture
Defense Mechanisms:
Denial
You completely reject the thought or feeling.
"I'm not angry with him!"
Defense Mechanisms:
Suppression
You are vaguely aware of the thought or feeling, but try to hide it.
"I'm going to try to be nice to him."
Defense Mechanisms:
Reaction Formation
You turn the feeling into its opposite.
"I think he's really great!"
Defense Mechanisms:
Projection
You think someone else has your thought or feeling.
"That professor hates me."
Defense Mechanisms: Displacement
You redirect your feelings to another target..
"I hate that secretary."
Defense Mechanisms:
Rationalization
You come up with various explanations to justify the situation (while denying your feelings).
"He's so critical because he's trying to help us do our best."
Defense Mechanisms:
Intellectualization
A type of rationalization, only more intellectualized.
"This situation reminds me of how Nietzsche said that anger is ontological despair."
Defense Mechanisms:
Undoing
You try to reverse or undo your feeling by DOING something that indicates the opposite feeling.
"I think I'll give that professor an apple."
Defense Mechanisms:
Isolation of affect
You "think" the feeling but don't really feel it.
"I guess I'm angry with him, sort of."
Defense Mechanisms:
Regression
You revert to an immature behavior to ventilate your feeling.
"Let's shoot spitballs at people!"
Sublimation
You redirect the feeling into a productive activity.
"I'm going to write a poem about anger."