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48 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Why Study Church History?
I.Christianity is a Historical Faith
II.To Correct, Amend, or Confirm Current Interpretations of Historical Issues
III.Understand and Evaluate Alternative Theologies, Methodologies, and Ideologies so as to Purify Our Own
IV.Personal Values
Christianity is a Historical Faith
Old Testament Judaism
Nature of Christian Doctrine
Methodology of Biblical Writers
To Correct, Amend, or Confirm Current Interpretations of Historical Issues
Papal Authority
Denominational Origins
Understand and Evaluate Alternative Theologies, Methodologies, and Ideologies so as to Purify Our Own
The Person of Christ
How is a Man Made Right with God?
What is the Church?
Personal Values
Individual Growth
Love for Our Brother
Necessary Orientation to Other Disciplines
Helps Fulfill the Ninth Commandment
Teaching Aid
Illustrative Material
PRESUPPOSITIONS ABOUT THE CHARACTER OF HISTORY
Metaphysical
Ethical
Redemptive
Metaphysical
entire historical process is meaningful
decisive canonocal event in history is God in Jesus
goal of creation is God's glory
final judgement of historical process in God's hands
Ethical
can know absolute moral law/ethical ideal
truth related to personality
human nature is constant
fallen human nature is sinful
all human actions are sinful
Redemptive
no rational being is insignificant
Christian redemption eliminates self-centered provincialism
First Century World Influences
Greek
Roman
Jewish
Greek
Philosophy
Speculative Cosmology
Relation of mind to reality
Language
Spirit
Other influences
3 relation of mind to reality
Socrates
Plato (up, contemplation)
Aristotle (down, observation)
3 other influences
Stoicism
Cynicism (doglife, naturalism)
Epicurianism (pleasure, no fear or pain)
Christian Attitude Toward Roman Culture (+&-)
+Jesus rendered to Caeser
+Paul was citizen and referenced bravery and military
-in Rev. it is Babylon
-Roman courts against
Advantages of Roman Culture
Pax Romana (Roman peace in land)
Roads
Political structure
Language (Latin)
Roman army as force for spreading gospel
Disadvantages of Roman Culture
syncretistic paganism
culture hostile to holiness
growing antagonism
types of syncretistic paganism
multiplicity
subordinate, complementary, functional dieties
private cults
Roman Culture hostile to holiness
taxes for prostitution
theatre was crude and sick
games of gladiators
Jewish influence (2 things)
continuity with Christian community
separation from Christian
Jewish Continuity
Scripture (inspiration of OT and necessity of canon)
Monotheism
Messianic Expectations
Style of worship
Jewish Separation
NT-they reject Christ and apostles
Persecution from the Jews
Destruction of Temple in 70
"Bar-Cochba" (132-135) false Messiah
Christians viewing themselves as covenant people
Jewish parties
Scribes and Lawyers
Pharisees
Sadducees
Samaritans
Herodians
Zealots
Four Distinct Periods of First Century
Jesus Christ - Gospels
Jerusalem Period - Petrine (Acts 1-12)
Missionary Expansion - Pauline
Westward Growth
External Opposition to Christianity
popular antagonism
intellectual assults
physical persecution
Popular Antagonism
religioulsly (atheism, immorality, cannibalism, magic/sorcery)
economically
Intellectual Assaults
Christian writings
Apologetic Literature
Christian writings as result
edificatory
polemical
apologetics
systematic exposition
types of apologetic literature
philosophical
psychological
epistemological
historical
Bibliological
Two opponents of Christian writing
Celsus- argued for rational demonstration
Porphyry- neo-Platonist, considered Christianity too new
problematic doctrines of the day
creation and providence
rationality of incarnation
resurrection
novelty
name some apologists of the day
Justin Martyr
Tatian
Quadratus
Aristides
Arguments of Apologists
just treatment
explain charges
describe Christian practices
explain Christian beliefs
Unveil paganism
results of intellectual assaults
Christianity defensible (coherence, cogency, comprehensiveness, clarity)
solidifying recognition of a canon of Scripture
Reasons for physical persecution
"religio illicita"
universality
hated by influential class
seditious and rebellious
natural calamities
some early persecutors
Jewish
Nero
Damitian (81-96)
Trajan (98-117)
Antoninus (138-161)
Marcus Aurelius (161-180)
some empire wide persecutions
Decian (249-251)-crime of being Christian
Valerian (253-259)-viscious and bloody
Diocletian (284-305)-most severe
results of persecutions
varied church response
controversy over lapsed
religious abnormalities
prestige of bishop heightened
great examples of heroic faith
varied response of church members
Martyrs-died
Confessors-physical
Traditors-handed scripture
Libellitici-false papers
Lapsi-denied
controversy over policy towards lapsed
montanists
novationists
donatists
who was Justin Martyr
born 100-110 of heathen parents
studied philosophy under several teachers
converted 130 from strong Christian witness
established school in Rome
beheaded under Junius Rusticus
aspects of Justin's thoughts
centrality of kerygma
moral superiority of Christianity
clarity of truth superior in Christianity
theological ideas central to his thought
Justin's theological ideas
Scripture
Christ
God
Spirit
Man
Sin
the demonic
Salvation
Punishment
Resurrection
Genres of Edificatory writings
two ways genre
pastoral genre
persecution literature
two ways genre
(life and death, light and darkness)
Didache, Barnabas, Shepherd by Hermas
pastoral genre
Clement
2 Clement
Letters of Ignatius
Polycarp
persecution literature
Martyrdom of Polycarp
Hermes
Letter from Lyons
characteristics of Edificatory writings
(encourage Christian growth and fortitude)
internal unity
conversant with Scripture
individual responsibility
Church order
Warnings against pagan religions
Christian morality contra immorality of culture
sharing in sufferings of Christ
Theology of Edificatory writings
Doctrine of God
Christ (preexistence-incarnation,Death,Resurrection)
Scripture
Eternal destinies
Soteriology (no non-Lordship salvation)
Ecclesiology
Ethics