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12 Cards in this Set

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Muscular Control & Movement
All human movement depends upon proper functioning of the skeletal muscles, whether at rest or in motion. To understand the muscular system, it is important to understand the anatomy and physiology of the human body from the gross external level to the micro and molecular level. Knowing how the muscles function enables us to determine how movement is created.
Chapt 2
Neurological Control of Movement
Conditions within and outside of the body are constantly changing, and one purpose of the nervous system is to respond to these internal and external changes so that the body may adapt itself.
Chapt 3
Neuromuscular Adaptations to Resistance Training
Strength is the maximal amount of weight a person can lift just once. Power is the product of speed and strength. Training can result in large gains in strength but only small gains in speed. Increasing strength increases muscular power. Power is the key component for athletic performance.
Chapt 4
Muscles, Nutrients & Metabolism
In order for our muscles to produce movement they must use energy. The body’s primary source of energy is ATP (adenosine triphosphatase, a high-energy phosphate compound) which is produced through metabolic processes. You should have a basic understanding of how the muscles use food to create energy.
Chapt 5
Hormonal Regulation of Exercise
The endocrine and nervous systems initiate and control movement and all physiological processes that movement involves. The endocrine system includes all tissues or glands that secrete hormones. Hormones travel through the blood and target specific areas of the body. There are two basic types of hormones: steroid and non-steroid.
Chapt 6
Metabolic Adaptations to Training
The metabolic system does adapt to the repeated stimulus of training. The metabolic system can be trained to use food and the nutrients the body has stored, in more efficient ways. Aerobic and anaerobic exercises play a vital part in training the metabolic system to maximize the energy systems.
Chap 7
Cardiovascular Control During Exercise
The cardiovascular system includes the heart (a pump), blood vessels (a system of channels), and blood (a fluid medium). All bodily functions and every cell in your body depend in some way on this system.
Chap 8
Respiratory Regulation During Exercise
The respiratory system
Brings oxygen into the body
Delivers oxygen to our muscles
Rids the body of carbon dioxide
Has a role in maintaining acid-base balance

External and internal respiration are linked by the circulatory system.
Chap 9
Cardiorespiratory Adaptations to Training
Endurance training can improve the performance of all types of sports and activities. Every training program should have an endurance component targeting the muscles and the cardiorespiratory system.

Muscular endurance is the ability of a single muscle or group of muscles to sustain high-intensity, repetitive, or static exercise. Cardiorespiratory endurance relates to the whole body's ability to sustain prolonged, rhythmical exercise.

VO2max is a laboratory measure of cardiorespiratory endurance. VO2 max is defined as the highest rate of oxygen consumption attainable during maximal or exhaustive exercise.
Chap 9
Cardiorespiratory Adaptations to Training
Endurance training can improve the performance of all types of sports and activities. Every training program should have an endurance component targeting the muscles and the cardiorespiratory system.

Muscular endurance is the ability of a single muscle or group of muscles to sustain high-intensity, repetitive, or static exercise. Cardiorespiratory endurance relates to the whole body's ability to sustain prolonged, rhythmical exercise.

VO2max is a laboratory measure of cardiorespiratory endurance. VO2 max is defined as the highest rate of oxygen consumption attainable during maximal or exhaustive exercise.
Chap 10
Thermoregulation and Exercise
Chapter 10 and 11 discuss the body’s adaptations to environmental changes in temperature and atmospheric pressure, particularly during exercise. The environment can place additional stress on the physiological systems we have discussed previously. Our bodies always attempt to maintain a constant internal environment.
Exercise in Hypobaric, Hyperbaric and Microgravity Environments
This chapter examines the conditions experienced in specialized environments and how the body performs in these conditions. A general awareness of how these conditions affect the body is all that is necessary.

Changes in barometric pressure and gravitational force affect athletic performance.