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30 Cards in this Set

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A mixture where particles can be seen and easily separate by settling or filtration.
SUSPENSION
A neutral solution has this number as its pH.
7
This does not react with other carbonates.
A BASE
Solutes lower the freezing point of water and that makes this happen.
MAKING IT HARDER FOR WATER TO FORM CRYSTALS
A polar solvent will most likely dissolve this.
POLAR SOLUTES
Things that produce hydroxide ions in water. (i.e. sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide)
BASES
This is what you would get if you added a small amount of hydrochloric acid to 4 liters of water.
DILUTE SOLUTION
This measures the concentration of hydrogen ions.
pH scale
The reaction between an acid and a base.
NEUTRALIZATION
The place in the body where the pH is the highest.
SMALL INTESTINE
Adding more solute to a dilute solution causes it to become more of this.
CONCENTRATED SOLUTION
This is how acids are described because they dissolve some metals.
CORROSIVE
A substance that turns different colors into an acid or a base.
INDICATOR
This is caused by the release of pollutants into the air and causes damage to stautes, forests, and lakes.
ACID RAIN
The process that breaks down the complex molecules of food into smaller molecules.
CHEMICAL DIGESTION
When a base reacts with an acid, water and THIS form.
SALT
When acids react with carbonate compounds, This forms.
CARBON DIOXIDE
This forms hydrogen ions when it is dissolved in water.
ACID
This is the part of a solution present in the largest amount.
SOLVENT
Solutes do this to the boiling point of a solvent.
INCREASE
You put salt into a jar of water, shook it up, and allowed it to sit for a day. Now there is crystals of table salt at the bottom of the jar, so what can you say about the concentration of this solution?
IT IS "SATURATED" BECAUSE THE EXTRA SALT HAS SETTLED TO THE BOTTOM OF THE JAR
If you had a jar of water and salt where salt crystals had formed at the bottom, what would happen if you heated the jar? What would happen if you cooled the jar?
If you heated the jar, more of the salt would dissolve.

If you cooled the jar, more of the salt would settle at the bottom.
What happens to the particles of a solid solute when the solute is dissolved in a solvent?
The particles break apart and are surrounded by the particles of the solvent
Why must the pH values of the mouth, stomach, and small intestine be different?
Because enzymes in these organs work the best at different pH values.
What two ways is adding antifreeze to the water in a car radiator useful?
It raises the boiling point and it reduces the freezing point of the water to prevent possible damage.
In the equation...
NH3 + H2O -> NH4+ +OH-
is ammonia(NH3) an acid or a base? Why?
Ammonia(NH3) is a base because in a water solution(H2O) it produces hydroxide ions (OH-).
If you do not know the products of a resulting solution, how could you determine whether it contains ions or a dissolved molecular solid?
You could test the conductivity of the solution. If the solution contains ions, it will conduct electricity where as molecular solids do not conduct electricity.
What chemical reaction would happen if acid rain falls on a lake that has basic water(high PH)? What would happen to the lake's pH?
Acid rain has a low pH so it will neutralize the water in the lake and a salt will form. This will make the pH of the lake decrease.
How is a weak acid different from a dilute acid?
A weak acid has a small number of H+ ions.
A dilute acid has just a small amount of acid solute.
How are the dissolved particles of a molecular solid such, as sugar, different from the dissolved particles of an ionic solid, such as table salt?
Molecular solids are completely surrounded by solvent but they remain neutral.
Ionic solids will split into ions which are positive and negative.