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23 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Attila
(p. 268)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Warrior king of the Huns. From the mid-5th century C.E., under his leadership the Huns invaded Hungary, probed Roman frontiers in the Balkan region, menaced Gaul and northern Italy, and attacked Germanic peoples living on the borders of the Roman empire.
Alaric
(p. 268)
Chapter 11 Exchange
The leader of the Visigoths; under his command, the Visigoths sacked the city of Rome in 410 C.E.
Constantine
(p. 266)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Roman emperor, known for his unification of the Roman empire after it was divided by Diocletian into two administrative districts; established Constantinople as the new capital city; also known as the first Christian emperor of the Roman empire, whose Edict of Milan in 313 C. E. allowed Christians to practice their faith openly.
Diocletian
(p. 266)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Roman emperor, known for his division of the empire into two administrative districts, each ruled by a coemperor with the aid of a powerful lieutenant.
Gregory the Wonderworker
(p. 259)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Tireless Christian missionary with a reputation for performing miracles; popularized Christianity in central Anatolia during the mid-third century C.E.
Mani
(p. 260)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Founder of Manichaeism; a devout Zoroastrian prophet from Babylon in Mesopotamia who drew religious inspiration from Christianity and Buddhism; lived from 216 to 272 C.E.
Odovacer
(p. 268)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Germanic general; in 476 C.E., deposed Romulus Augustus, the last Roman emperor in the western half of the empire.
St. Augustine
(p. 269-70)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Bishop of Hippo in north Africa; well educated in philosophy; harmonized Christianity with Platonic thought so that Christianity could be easily appreciated by intellectuals and the educated classes.
Theodosius
(p. 268-69)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Emperor of the Byzantine empire, known for his proclamation that made Christianity the official religion of the empire in 380 C.E.
Zhang Qian
(p. 249-50)
Chapter 11 Exchange
A courtier of the Han dynasty who was sent by the emperor to central Asia to arrange for allies against the Xiongnu in 139 B.C.E; twice captured by the Xiongnu but finally managed to escape and return to China twelve years later; became a hero known for his unwavering loyalty to the emperor. His travels contributed to the opening of the silk roads.
barracks emperors
(p. 266)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Claimants to the imperial throne of the Roman empire, mostly generals, who frequently replaced one another in a violent manner during the half century from 235 to 284 C.E.
Byzantine empire
(p. 268)
Chapter 11 Exchange
The eastern half of the Roman empire which survived invasions of Germanic peoples in the 5th century C.E. and lasted for about one millennium thereafter. The capital city was Constantinople.
church councils
(p. 270)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Assemblies of religious authorities of Christianity, held to resolve theological disputes among Christians and determine official doctrines.
The City of God
(p. 270)
Chapter 11 Exchange
The famous work of St. Augustine which sought to explain the meaning of history and the world from a Christian point of view.
dioceses
(p. 270)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Christian districts presided over by bishops; present in all the prominent cities of the Roman empire from the fourth century C.E. onward
Edict of Milan
(p. 268)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Issued by emperor Constantine in 313 C.E., a proclamation that made Christianity a legitimate religion in the Roman empire.
Germanic peoples
(p. 267)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Originally the nomadic peoples of northern Europe, including Visigoths, Vandals, Franks, Ostrogoths, Angles and Saxons, and Lombards. Migrated to the eastern and northern borders of the Roman empire from the second century C.E.; beginning in the mid-5th century, invaded the western Roman empire and deposed the emperor there in 476; settled in Italy, Gaul, Spain, Britain, and north Africa.
Manichaeism
(p. 260)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Religious sect founded by Mani in the 3rd century C.E.; doctrine sought to blend Zoroastrian, Christian, and Buddhist elements into one religious faith; viewed the world as the site of a cosmic struggle between the forces of light and darkness, good and evil. Taught followers to reject worldly pleasure as a way to achieve personal salvation and eternal association with the forces of light and good. Devout Manichaeans were called "the elect" while the less zealous ones were "hearers." This doctrine attracted converts in Mesopotamia and the Roman empire but survived only in central Asia after the 6th century C.E.
monsoon system
(p. 252)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Trading network of the Indian basin linking India and Arabia in the east and Egypt and the Mediterranean basin in the west by the way of the Red Sea; so called because merchant seamen relied on the monsoon winds to govern their sailing and shipping in the Indian Ocean.
The Nestorians
(p. 259-60)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Sect of Christianity founded by the Greek theologian Nestorius during the early 5th century C.E.; doctrine emphasized the human as opposed to the divine nature of Jesus; rejected by Mediterranean church authorities but found large following in southwest Asia. Via the silk roads the Nestorians established communities in central Asia, India, and China.
The pope
(p. 270)
Chapter 11 Exchange
From the Latin word papa ("father"); bishop of Rome who emerged as a spiritual leader of Christian communities after the collapse of western Roman empire.
silk roads
(p. 250, 252-55)
Chapter 11 Exchange
Network of trade routes that linked much of Eurasia and north Africa through land routes and sea lanes; so called because high-quality silk from China was one of the principal commodities exchanged over the roads.
tetrarchs
(p. 266)
Chapter 11 Exchange
The four top co-rulers of the Roman empire, including two coemperors and two powerful lieutenants; ruled the Mediterranean lands after Diocletian divided the empire into two administrative districts. After Diocletian's death in 305 C.E., power struggle among the co-rulers and their generals led to bitter civil war.