• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/27

Click to flip

27 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
MONROE DOCTRINE
policy that was introduced on December 2, 1823, which stated that further efforts by European countries to colonize land or interfere with states in the Americas would be viewed, by the United States of America, as acts of aggression requiring US intervention
ISOLATIONISM
a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military policy and a political policy of economic nationalism (protectionism).
IMPERIALISM
the creation and maintenance of an unequal economic, cultural and territorial relationship, usually between states and often in the form of an empire, based on domination and subordination.
JOSIAH STRONG
an American Protestant clergyman, organizer, editor and author. He was one of the founders of the Social Gospel movement that sought to apply Protestant religious principles to solve the social ills brought on by industrialization, urbanization and immigration
“OUR COUNTRY”
a book written by Protestant cleric Josiah Strong
QUEEN LILIUOKALANI
hawaiian queen who was overthrown
ALFRED THAYER MAHAN
a leader behind the creation of the US navy
“THE INFLUENCE OF SEA POWER UPON HISTORY”
is a history of naval warfare written in 1890 by Alfred Thayer Mahan.
GEORGE DEWEY
was an admiral of the United States Navy
MCKINLEY TARIFF
set the average ad valorem tariff rate for imports to the United States at 48.4%, and protected manufacturing.
WILSON GORMAN TARIFF
slightly reduced the United States tariff rates from the numbers set in the 1890 McKinley tariff and imposed a 2% income tax.
VALERIANO WEYLER
lieutenant who put many cubans into concentration camps
YELLOW JOURNALISM
using powerful words to sell newspapers
USS MAINE
a naval ship which blew up
RECONCENTRATION POLICY
the acts of putting cubans into camps
TELLER AMENDMENT
an amendment to a joint resolution of the United States Congress, enacted on April 19, 1898, in reply to President William McKinley's War Message. It placed a condition of the United States military in Cuba. According to the clause, the U.S. could not annex Cuba but only leave "control of the island to its people."
“SPLENDID LITTLE WAR”
Spanish–American War
Part of the Philippine Revolution, Cuban War of Independence

Charge of the Rough Riders at San Juan Hill, by Frederic Remington
Date April 25 – August 12, 1898
Location Cuba, and Puerto Rico (Caribbean)
Philippines, and Guam (Asia-Pacific)
Result United States victory
Treaty of Paris
Philippine–American War
Territorial
changes Spain relinquishes sovereignty over Cuba, cedes the Philippine Islands, Puerto Rico, and Guam to the United States for the sum of $20 million.

Belligerents
United States
Cuban separatists
Puerto Rican separatists
Katipunan[1][2][3] Kingdom of Spain
Commanders and leaders
William McKinley
Nelson A. Miles
William R. Shafter
George Dewey
William T. Sampson
Máximo Gómez
Emilio Aguinaldo
Apolinario Mabini Práxedes Mateo Sagasta
Patricio Montojo
Pascual Cervera
Arsenio Linares y Pombo
Manuel Macías y Casado
Ramón Blanco y Erenas
Strength
Cuban Republic:

30,000 irregulars[4]:19
United States:


300,000 regulars and volunteers[4]:22 Spanish Army:

278,447 regulars and militia[4]:20 (Cuba),
10,005 regulars and militia[4]:20 (Puerto Rico),
51,331 regulars and militia[4]:20 (Philippines)

Casualties and losses
Cuban Republic:

10,665 dead[4]:20
United States Army:


345 dead,
1,577 wounded,
2,565 diseased[4]:67
United States Navy:


16 dead,
68 wounded[4]:67 Spanish Navy:

560 dead,
300–400 wounded[4]:67
Spanish Army:


3,000 dead or wounded
6,700 captured,[5](Philippines)
13,000 diseased[4] (Cuba)
[show]v • d • eSpanish–American War

Atlantic Ocean Theater
Cuba–Puerto Rico
Pacific Ocean Theater
The Philippines – Guam

[show]v • d • eNineteenth century Atlantic/Mediterranean conflicts involving the United States

Quasi War
Action of 1 January 1800 - Battle of Puerto Plata Harbor - Action of 12 October 1800 - Action of 25 October 1800
First Barbary War
Action of 1 August 1801 - First Battle of Tripoli Harbor - Action of 22 June 1803 - Second Battle of Tripoli Harbor - Battle of Derne
Chesapeake Affair
Little Belt Affair
War of 1812
Atlantic Naval Campaign
Second Barbary War
Battle off Cape Gata - Battle off Cape Palos
Anti-Piracy Operations
Patterson's Town Raid - Action of 31 August 1819 - Action of 26 August 1822 - Action of 9 November 1822 - Action of 2 March 1825 - Action of 23 October 1827
St. Johns Affair
Second Seminole War
Battle of Wahoo Swamp - Battle of Jupiter Inlet
Veracruz Affair
Mexican-American War
Mosquito Fleet Campaign - Gulf Coast Theater
Suppression of the Slave Trade
Nicaraguan Rebellion
Bombardment of San Juan del Norte
Paraguayan Conflict
Itapiru Incident - Paraguay expedition
Reform War
Battle of Anton Lizardo
American Civil War
Eastern Theater - Western Theater - Trans-Mississippi Theater - Lower Seaboard Theater - Battle of Cherbourg - Bahia Incident
Sinking of the Maine
Spanish-American War
Cuban Campaign - Puerto Rican Campaign

[show]v • d • eNineteenth century Asia/Pacific conflicts involving the United States

American Indian Wars
War of 1812
Battle of Valaparaiso
Sumatran Conflicts
Friendship Incident · Battle of Quallah Battoo
Eclipse Incident · Bombardment of Quallah Battoo · Battle of Muckie
Wilkes Expedition
Battle of Malolo
Capture of Monterey
Mexican–American War
California Campaign · Pacific Coast Campaign
China Anti-Piracy Patrols
Battle of Ty-ho Bay
Puget Sound War
Battle of Seattle · Battle of Port Gamble
Second Opium War
First Battle of Canton · Battle of the Pearl River Forts · Second Battle of Taku Forts
American Civil War
Pacific Coast Theatre · Capture of J. M. Chapman
Cochinchina Campaign
Bombardment of Qui Nhơn
Japanese Conflict
Pembroke Incident
Battle of Shimonoseki Straits · Shimonoseki Campaign
Formosan Conflict
Rover Incident · Formosan Expedition
Korean Conflict
General Sherman Incident · Bombardment of the Selee River Forts · Battle of Ganghwa
Mexico Anti-Piracy Patrols
Battle of Boca Teacapan
First Samoan Civil War
Samoan crisis
Second Samoan Civil War
Siege of Apia · First Battle of Vailele · Battle of Falefa · Battle of Mangia · Third Battle of Vailele
Spanish–American War
Pacific Theater
Philippine–American War
Filipino Rebellion · Moro Rebellion
Boxer Rebellion
Battle of Peking · Battle of Tientsin


The Spanish–American War was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States
WALTER LAFEBER
was a Marie Underhill Noll Professor and a Steven Weisse Presidential Teaching Fellow of History in the Department of History at Cornell University. He is one of the United States' most distinguished historians, a revisionist, of the nation's Foreign Relations.
WILLIAM HENRY SEWARD
he engineered the purchase of Alaska from Russia in an act that was ridiculed at the time as "Seward's Folly",
SAN JUAN HILL
a series of hills to the east of Santiago, Cuba running north to south and known as the San Juan Heights or in Spanish "Alturas de San Juan" before Spanish-American War of 1898.
TREATY OF PARIS 1898
signed on December 10, 1898, at the end of the Spanish-American War.
CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS
) was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat and writer.[1] He was the grandson of President John Adams and Abigail Adams and the son of President John Quincy Adams.
ANTI-IMPERIALIST LEAGUE
an organization established in the United States on June 15, 1898 to battle the American annexation of the Philippines
FORAKER ACT
established civilian (limited popular) government on the island of Puerto Rico
PLATT AMENDMENT
defined the terms of Cuban-U.S. relations until the 1934 Treaty of Relations.
OPEN DOOR POLICY
a concept in foreign affairs, which usually refers to the policy around 1900 allowing multiple Imperial powers access to China, with none of them in control of that country
JOHN HAY
was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln.