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59 Cards in this Set

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Industry standard for the type of connection to the motherboard
used by peripherals (i.e. mouse, screen, etc...)
16-bit bus
Counting devices using beads on wires
Abacus
Two devices created by Charles Babbage that provided the basis
for future calculation/tabulation machines & technology.
Analytical Engine/Difference Engine
Considered by many to be the first electronic digital computer
Atanasoff-Berry computer (ABC)
Smallest unit of information on a computer
Bit
Wafer, usually made of silicon, that has held anywhere from 10's
of transistors (in the 1960s) to millions (currently).
Chip
Program designed to assemble & translate computer
instructions, assisting programmers in their code writing
Compiler
Time frames in computer history, each indicated by the most
significant technological innovations of that era.
Computer generations
Chart used as part of a manual counting system
Counting table
* Aka: ENIAC
*Considered the first electronic digital computer with programmable logic (1946)
Electronic Numerical Integrator & Computer
Removable component designed to store data/files on a disk for
future use
Floppy disk drive
*Aka: GUI
*Common variation of operating systems; systems use icons & require the user to select the proper picture on the screen, usually with a mouse
Graphical user interface
*Aka: ISA
*Design agreed upon as the standard so that all computers made have similar basic setups & can share peripheral components
Industry Standard Architecture
A series of transistors & the components to run them placed on 1 chip
Integrated circuit (IC)
Portable computer
Laptop
Repetition of instructions; often refers to those in a computer
program
Looping
Technology in which data are held on magnetized disks rather than punched cards or paper tape
Magnetic data storage memory
Very large computer designed to support several users & run
several programs at once
Mainframe computer
Mechanical computing machine designed to complete several
sequences of calculations at once (late 1930s+)
Mark I
A single chip that can run the processing for an entire computer
Microprocessor
Similar in capability to a mainframe but much smaller
Minicomputer
Integrated circuits that are placed on one substrate together
Monolithic integrated circuits
Derived by Intel cofounder Gordon Moore in 1965; states that the # of transistors & amount of “data density” on each chip will continue to double every 12–18 mos for the
“foreseeable future.”
Moore’s Law
The main base for computer circuitry in a system
Motherboard
Sets of programs built into the system that control its functions
Operating systems
Part of the 4th generation of computers; small enough to sit
on a desktop; made possible by the invention of the
microprocessor
Personal computer (PC)/ Microcomputer
Handheld computer peripheral/stand-alone computer that is used to hold calendars, business contact information, etc. & can link to a personal computer
Personal digital assistant (PDA)
Capability of the computer to respond to a series of instructions
Programmable logic
Heavy paper or metal card with a series of holes used as a means of manipulating a mechanical device (such as a Jacquard loom) or programming a computer; also a means of providing both input & o/put (series of holes indicates alphanumeric characters, instructions, etc.).
Punched card
The fastest, most highly sophisticated type of computer used for the most complex of tasks (cost prohibits general use).
Supercomputer
Device that can transmit electrical impulses & modulate current
Transistor
Transistor-based computer used by the military for missiles
(1957)
Transistor Test Computer (TRANSTEC)
1st commercially available computer (1951)
Universal Automatic Computer (UNIVAC)
A more user-friendly approach to applications such as word
processing in which what appears on the screen is exactly what will be printed
“What you see is what you get” (WYSIWYG)
Presented by Tim Berners-Lee in 1991, this browser/ editor has become the basis for the international info exchange known as the Internet
World Wide Web (WWW.)
What does ABC stand for?
Atanasoff-Berry computer
What does ENIAC stand for?
Electronic Numerical Integrator & computer
What does GUI stand for?
Graphical user interface
What does ISA stand for?
Industry Standard Architecture
What does IC stand for?
Integrated circuit
What does PC stand for?
Personal computer
What does PDA stand for?
Personal digital assistant
What does TRANSTEC stand for?
Transitor Test Computer
What does UNIVAC stand for?
Universal Automatic Computer
What does WYSIWYG stand for?
"What you see is what you get"
What does WWW. stand for?
World wide web
Built by John Vincent Atanasoff & Clifford Berry at Iowa State
University from 1937 to 1942.
ABC (Atanasoff-Berry Comp)
Usually made of silicon
Chip
Built from 1937 - 1942
ABC (Atanasoff-Berry Comp)
Created by Charles Babbage
Analytical Engine/Difference engine
Made in 1946
ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator & Comp)
Icons that you click on to open up the program
GUI (graphical user interface)
Made in the late 1930s+
Mark I
Derived by Intel cofounder Gordon Moore in 1965
Moore's Law
This was made possible by the invention of the microprocessor
PC (personal comp/microcomp)
Made in 1957
TRANSTEC (Transistor Test Comp)
Presented by Tim Berners-Lee
WWW (World wide web)
Made in 1951
UNIVAC (Universal Automatic Comp)
Presented in 1991
WWW (World wide web)