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20 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
19. SE of DPT/DTaP vaccine? (In general, only the acellular (DTaP) pertussis vaccine is available; all of the adverse events are far more common with the cellular (DTP) form.
a. Local and febrile reaction.
b. Redness, oedema, induration at the injection site.
c. Drowsiness, fretfulness, anorexia, vomiting, crying.
d. Slight to moderate fever
e. Bacterial or sterile abscesses at the site of injection (6-10 cases per million injections).
f. Allergic reactions (2 cases per 100,000) injections, transient urticarial rash.
g. Seizures (incidence occurring w/in 48 hours is 1 case per 1750).
h. Hypotonic-hyporesponsiveness (also called “collapse” or “shocklike state”) episodes (1 case per 1750 doses).
i. Fever ≥40.5 (105) (.3% of recipients)
j. Persistent, severe, inconsolable screaming or crying (1 case per 100 doses)
20. Contraindications to DPT/DTaP vaccine?
a. Anaphylactic reaction to vaccine or vaccine constituent
b. Moderate or severe illness with or w/o a fever
c. Encephalopathy w/I 7 days of administration of previous dose of DPT/DTaP vaccine.
21. Precautions to DPT/DTaP vaccine?
a. Fever≥40.5 (105) w/in 48 hours of prior dose.
b. Collapse or shock-like state (hypotonic-hyporesponsivenss
c. Seizures w/I 3 days of receiving a prior dose DPT/DTaP (acetaminophen given prior to administering DPT/DTaP vaccine and every 4h thereafter for 24 hours should be considered for children w/a personal or family hx of convulsions in siblings of parents.
d. Persistent, inconsolable crying lasting >3 hours w/I 48 hours of receiving a prior dose of DPT/DTaP.
e. Guillain-Barre syndrome w/in 6 wks after a dose of DTP/DTaP.
22. SE of Hep B vaccine?
a. Pain at injection site and temperature of >37.7 (99.86) (1-6% of recipients)
b. Anaphylaxis in 1/600,000 doses.
23. Contraindications to Hep B vaccine?
a. Anaphylactic reaction to vaccine or vaccine constituent
b. Anaphylactic reaction to baker’s yeast.
24. Precautions to HepB vaccine?
a. Moderate or severe illness w/or w/fever
25. SE of MMR vaccine?
a. Fever up to 103 in 5-15% of cases 7-12 days after injection (live vaccine), lasting 1-2 days.
b. Rash in ~5% of vaccines.
c. Transient thrombocytopenia.
d. Encephalitis and encephalopathy in 1/million doses, less often w/revaccination.
e. Allergic reaction (Rare, even in children w/documented egg allergy).
f. Clinically apparent thrombocytopenia w/I 2 months of the vaccine occurs in <1/25-40,000 vaccinated children, clustered about 2-3 wks after the vaccine, and is generally transient and benign in nature.
26. Can you develop subacute sclerosing Panencephalitis with MMR vaccine?
a. It is possibly a rare complication.
27. Contraindications to MMR vaccine?
a. Anaphylactic reaction to neomycin or gelatin
b. Pregnancy
c. Known altered immunodeficiency (Haematologic and solid tumours, severe HIV infection, congenital immunodeficiency, and long-term immunosuppressive therapy.
28. Precautions to MMR vaccine?
a. Recent Ig administration w/in 3-11 months depending on product.
b. Thrombocytopenia or hx of thrombocytopenic purpura.
29. SE of Inactivated poliovirus vaccine?
a. None
30. Contraindications or precautions to inactivated polio vaccine?
a. Contraindications: Anaphylactic reaction to streptomycin, polymyxin B, and neomycin.
b. Precautions: Pregnancy
31. SE of Varicella vaccine?
a. Rash within 1 month of immunization: A mild maculopapular or varicelliform rash (median of about 2-5 lesions) at injection site or elsewhere.
i. Develops in about 7 of children and about 8% of susceptible adolescents/adults.
b. Pain, redness and/or swelling at injection site in 20% of children and 25-35% of adolescents.
c. Zoster-like illness (rash and minimal or absent system symptoms) has been reported in vaccines (~18 cases per 100,000 person years).
d. No cases have been severe.
32. Can a person who has received the varicella vaccine transmit the vaccine virus from a healthy person to another person?
a. Yes, rare (<1%) and appears to occur only if the vaccinated person develops a rash.
b. Transmission of this vaccine virus appears to cause mild or no disease.
33. Contraindications to Varicella vaccine?
a. Anaphylactic reaction to neomycin or gelatin
b. Infection w/HIV
c. Known immunodeficiency (hematologic and solid tumours, congenital immunodeficiency, and long-term immunosuppressive therapy).
34. Precautions to varicella vaccine?
a. Recent immunoglobulin administration (w/in 5 months)
b. Family hx of immunodeficiency.
35. SE of Pneumococcal vaccine?
a. Up to about ¼ infants had redness, tenderness, or swelling where the shot was given.
b. About 1 of 3 had a fever >38 (100.4)
c. Up to 1/50 had a higher fever >39 (102.2)
d. Some children also became fussy or drowsy, or had a loss of appetite.
36. Contraindications Pneumococcal vaccine?
a. Known anaphylactic reaction.
37. SE Hepatitis A vaccine?
a. Soreness where the shot was given (about 1 of 2 adults and up to 1/5 children).
b. HA (1/6 adults and 1/20 children)
c. Loss of appetite (1/12 children).
d. Fatigue (1/14 adults)
e. If these problems occur, they usually come 3-5 days after vaccination and last for 1 or 2 days.
38. Contraindications to HepA vaccine?
a. Known anaphylactic reaction.