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40 Cards in this Set

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maudlin
adj.感情脆弱的
n.脆弱的感情Tearfully or excessively sentimental.

The movie's overly maudlin tone was at odds with the book it was adapted from, as the author hadn't felt the need to tug his readers heartstrings quite so forcefully.

Maudlin is an alteration of (Mary) Magdalene, who in paintings was often represented with eyes red and swollen from weeping.
verbose
adj.详细的, 冗长的

Abounding in words; using or containing more words than are necessary; tedious by an excess of words; wordy; as, "a verbose speaker; a verbose argument."
indigence
n.贫乏, 穷困
A state of extreme poverty or destitution.

Such was the band's indigence that all they could afford was 'loser's lunch', a meal which consisted of baloney on hand, as they could not afford even bread.

Indigence comes from Latin indigentia, "neediness," from indigens, indigent- present participle of indigere to be in need of, from Latin indu (archaic form of in-), "in" + egere "to be needy, to need, to lack." The adjective form is indigent.
resipiscent
adj.改变心意的, 悔改的

Having returned to a saner mind.

From Latin resipiscere (to recover one's senses), from re- (again) + sapere (to taste, to know). Ultimately from Indo-European root sep-
(to taste or perceive) that is also the source of sage, savant, savvy, savor, sapid, sapient, and insipid.

I am a recidivist, frequently guilty of overwriting and overciting.
But I am at least a resipiscent recidivist. I have come around to the
view that, though it may take discipline to cut more quickly to the chase and to doff the security blanket that writers weave from string citations, we, as judges, must dedicate ourselves to the task.
Excerpt from Hon. Bruce M. Selya; In Search of Less; Texas Law Review;
Volume 74, 1996.
matutinal
adj.早的

Relating to or occurring in the morning; early.

Matutinal is from Late Latin matutinalis, from Latin matutinus, "early in the morning; pertaining to the morning."
jollification
n.热闹, 欢乐
Merrymaking; festivity; revelry.

The office's new jollification committee had such a small budget that they could only festoon the office with multi-colored streamers twice a week.

Jollification is from jolly (from Old French joli, jolif, "joyful, merry") + Latin -ficare, combining form of facere, "to make."
punctilious
adj.拘泥细节的, 谨小慎微的, 一丝不苟的

Strictly attentive to the details of form in action or conduct; precise; exact in the smallest particulars.

Cooper had always been very punctilious about observing the rules laiddown in the . . . brochure.
supramundane
adj.远离俗世的

Above or beyond this world.

From Latin supra- (above) + mundus (world).

At first it was a giant column that soon took the shape of a supramundane mushroom.
coruscate
vi.闪烁, 焕发
1. To give off or reflect bright beams or flashes of light; to sparkle.
2. To exhibit brilliant, sparkling technique or style.

They pulled up at the farthest end of a loop path that looked out over the great basin of the Rio Grande under brilliant, coruscating stars.


Coruscate comes from Latin coruscatus, past participle of coruscare, "to move quickly, to tremble, to flutter, to twinkle or flash." The noun form is coruscation. Also from coruscare is the adjective coruscant, "glittering in flashes; flashing."
predilection
n.爱好, 偏袒
A predisposition to choose or like; an established preference.

While Franklin espoused a predilection for blondes, all of his girlfriends had been brunettes or redheads.

Predilection is at root "a liking before," from Latin prae-, "before" + diligere, "to choose; hence to prefer, to like very well."
dictatress
n.女独裁者
A female dictator.

From Latin dictator, from dictare (to dictate), frequentative of dicere
(to say). Ultimately from the Indo-European root deik- (to show, to pronounce
solemnly) that is also the source of other words such as judge, verdict,
vendetta, revenge, indicate, dictate, and paradigm.

America ... might become dictatress of the world. She would be no longer the ruler of her own spirit.
supplant
vt.排挤掉, 代替
1. To take the place of (another), especially through intrigue or underhanded tactics; as, a rival supplants another.
2. To take the place of and serve as a substitute for.

Brian was slow to realize it, but all of his daily duties were being supplanted by a younger, more cost-effective worker.

Supplant derives from Latin supplantare, "to put one's foot under another, to throw down a person by tripping up his heels," from sub-, "under" + plantare, "to stamp the ground with the foot," from planta, "the sole of the foot."
riposte
n.还刺, 机敏回答
1. A quick thrust given after parrying an opponent's lunge in fencing.
2. A quick and effective reply by word or act.

vi.还刺, 尖锐回答
To make a riposte.

It was an inelegant riposte, especially for one so quick-witted as Neumann.

When she told him how much she hated being called an old trout, he'd riposte: "The trout is the most beautiful of fish."

Riposte derives from Italian risposta, "an answer," from rispondere, "to answer," from Latin respondere, "to promise in return, to answer," from re- + spondere, "to promise."
ambuscade
n.埋伏, 埋伏处
vt.埋伏, 伏击
1. An ambush.
2. To attack by surprise from a concealed place; to ambush.

Ambuscade comes from Middle French embuscade, from Old Italian imboscata, from past participle of imboscare, "to ambush," from in, (from Latin) + bosco, "forest," of Germanic origin.
pastiche
n.混成曲, 模仿画
1. A work of art that imitates the style of some previous work.
2. A musical, literary, or artistic composition consisting of selections from various works.
3. A hodgepodge; an incongruous combination of different styles and ingredients.

Johnson's work was a pastiche of dozens of styles and from the recent past and antiquity, put together in such a way to suggest something totally new and original.

Pastiche comes from Italian pasticcio, "a paste," hence "a hodgepodge, literary or musical," ultimately from Latin pasta, "paste."
chortle
vi.咯咯笑
n.得意的高笑
To utter, or express with, a snorting, exultant laugh or chuckle.

A snorting, exultant laugh or chuckle.

Kip punctuated each of his sarcastic remarks with his customary, derisive chortle.

Chortle a combination of chuckle and snort.
identic
adj.同一的, 恒等的,完全相同的,措词相同的,形式相同的

1. Relating to a diplomatic action in which two or more governments agree to follow the same course in relations with another government.

2. Identical.

The Ottoman response of the same day ... led the ambassadors to forward an identic note pressuring the Ottoman government.
caterwaul
n.猫叫春声, 刺耳的尖叫声
vi.叫春, 发尖叫声, (象猫一样地)吵架
1. To make a harsh cry.
2. To have a noisy argument.

A shrill, discordant sound.

Meghan was determined that the concert not be held within earshot of her house that she not be subjected to the tuneless caterwauling of the lead singer all evening.

Caterwaul is from Middle English caterwawen, "to cry as a cat," either from Medieval Dutch kater, "tomcat" + Dutch wauwelen, "to tattle," or for catawail, from cat-wail, "to wail like a cat."
desideratum
plural desiderata
n.所愿望之物, 迫切需要之物

Something desired or considered necessary.

Immense wealth, and its lavish expenditure, fill the great house with all that can please the eye, or tempt the taste. Here, appetite, not food, is the great desideratum.

Desideratum is from Latin desideratum, "a thing desired," from desiderare, "to desire."
scapegrace
n.不可救药的恶棍,饭桶
A reckless, unprincipled person; one who is wild and reckless; a rascal; a scoundrel.

A care-free scapegrace as a boy, Terry grew up into the sort of person lesser men would follow into a fire if he so much as said "march."

Scapegrace is from scape (a variant of escape) + grace.
palaver
n.谈判, 交涉, 闲聊
vi.谈话(谈废话), 阿谀
vt.阿谀, 哄骗
1. Idle talk
2. Talk intended to beguile or deceive.
3. A parley usually between persons of different backgrounds or cultures or levels of sophistication; a talk; hence, a public conference and deliberation.

To talk idly.

To flatter; to cajole.

As the campaign switched into full gear, Adrian quickly grew tired of the insipid palaver that passed for political discourse in the debates.

Palaver derives from Late Latin parabola, "a proverb, a parable," from Greek parabole, from paraballein, "to compare," from para-, "beside" + ballein, "to throw."
gravid
adj.怀孕的, 妊娠的
Being with child; heavy with young or eggs; pregnant.

Mel was about to ask the woman for help with the heavy lifting, that is, until he noticed her gravid belly and realized the error of his ways.

Gravid derives from Latin gravidus, from ravis, "heavy."
foundling
n.弃儿, 育婴堂
A deserted or abandoned infant; a child found without a parent or caretaker.

Expectations were low for the foundling, yet she went on to graduate at the top of her class and became a captain of industry.

Foundling comes from Old English foundling, fundling, from finden, "to find" + the suffix -ling.
rapprochement
n.和睦, 亲善
The establishment or state of cordial relations.

After the things that were said during their last argument, Janice had no desire for some kissy rapprochement.

Rapprochement comes from the French, from rapprocher, "to bring nearer," from Middle French, from re- + approcher, "to approach," from Old French aprochier, from Late Latin appropire, from Latin ad- + propius, "nearer," comparative of prope, "near."
circumambulate
v.绕行, 巡行, 婉转打探

To walk around, especially ritually.

From Latin circum- (around) + ambulate (to walk about), from ambulare (to walk).
pecuniary
adj.金钱的, 金钱上的, 应罚款的

1. Relating to money; monetary.
2. Consisting of money.
3. Requiring payment of money.

Pecuniary comes from Latin pecuniarius, "of money, pecuniary," from pecunia, "property in cattle, hence money," from pecu, "livestock, one's flocks and herds."
trenchant
adj.锋利的
1. Characterized by or full of force and vigor; as, "a trenchant analysis."
2. Caustic; biting; severe; as, "trenchant criticism."
3. Distinct; clear-cut; clearly or sharply defined.

His revolutionary music, abrasive personality and trenchant writings about art and life divided the city into warring factions.

The trenchant divisions between right and wrong, honest and dishonest, respectable and the reverse, had left so little scope for the unforseen.

Trenchant comes from Old French, from the present participle of trenchier, "to cut." It is related to trench.
aborning
adj.产生中的
1. While being produced or born.
2. Being produced or born.

In universities at least as much as anywhere else, vast floods of words pour forth to no useful end. Nothing would be lost if they had died aborning.

Aborning is derived from a-, "in the act of" + English dialect borning, "birth."
affray
n.(尤指在公共场所的)吵架, 打架
A tumultuous assault or quarrel; a brawl.

While everyone knew that Ken and Sandy were going through a contentious divorce, nobody was prepared for the affray that played itself out in the courtroom on that day.

Affray comes from Old French esfrei, from esfreer, "to disquiet, to frighten."
coterminous
adj.相连的, 连接的
1. Having the same or coincident boundaries.
2. Having the same scope, range of meaning, duration.

As Ronald was fond of pointing out, in a democracy the interests of the people are, or at least should be, coterminous with those of the state.

Coterminous is from Latin conterminus, from com-, "together; with" + terminus, "boundary."
palaver
n.谈判, 交涉, 闲聊
vi.谈话(谈废话), 阿谀
vt.阿谀, 哄骗
1. Idle talk
2. Talk intended to beguile or deceive.
3. A parley usually between persons of different backgrounds or cultures or levels of sophistication; a talk; hence, a public conference and deliberation.

To talk idly.

To flatter; to cajole.

As the campaign switched into full gear, Adrian quickly grew tired of the insipid palaver that passed for political discourse in the debates.

Palaver derives from Late Latin parabola, "a proverb, a parable," from Greek parabole, from paraballein, "to compare," from para-, "beside" + ballein, "to throw."
gravid
adj.怀孕的, 妊娠的
Being with child; heavy with young or eggs; pregnant.

Mel was about to ask the woman for help with the heavy lifting, that is, until he noticed her gravid belly and realized the error of his ways.

Gravid derives from Latin gravidus, from ravis, "heavy."
foundling
n.弃儿, 育婴堂
A deserted or abandoned infant; a child found without a parent or caretaker.

Expectations were low for the foundling, yet she went on to graduate at the top of her class and became a captain of industry.

Foundling comes from Old English foundling, fundling, from finden, "to find" + the suffix -ling.
rapprochement
n.和睦, 亲善
The establishment or state of cordial relations.

After the things that were said during their last argument, Janice had no desire for some kissy rapprochement.

Rapprochement comes from the French, from rapprocher, "to bring nearer," from Middle French, from re- + approcher, "to approach," from Old French aprochier, from Late Latin appropire, from Latin ad- + propius, "nearer," comparative of prope, "near."
circumambulate
v.绕行, 巡行, 婉转打探

To walk around, especially ritually.

From Latin circum- (around) + ambulate (to walk about), from ambulare (to walk).
pecuniary
adj.金钱的, 金钱上的, 应罚款的

1. Relating to money; monetary.
2. Consisting of money.
3. Requiring payment of money.

Pecuniary comes from Latin pecuniarius, "of money, pecuniary," from pecunia, "property in cattle, hence money," from pecu, "livestock, one's flocks and herds."
trenchant
adj.锋利的
1. Characterized by or full of force and vigor; as, "a trenchant analysis."
2. Caustic; biting; severe; as, "trenchant criticism."
3. Distinct; clear-cut; clearly or sharply defined.

His revolutionary music, abrasive personality and trenchant writings about art and life divided the city into warring factions.

The trenchant divisions between right and wrong, honest and dishonest, respectable and the reverse, had left so little scope for the unforseen.

Trenchant comes from Old French, from the present participle of trenchier, "to cut." It is related to trench.
aborning
adj.产生中的
1. While being produced or born.
2. Being produced or born.

In universities at least as much as anywhere else, vast floods of words pour forth to no useful end. Nothing would be lost if they had died aborning.

Aborning is derived from a-, "in the act of" + English dialect borning, "birth."
affray
n.(尤指在公共场所的)吵架, 打架
A tumultuous assault or quarrel; a brawl.

While everyone knew that Ken and Sandy were going through a contentious divorce, nobody was prepared for the affray that played itself out in the courtroom on that day.

Affray comes from Old French esfrei, from esfreer, "to disquiet, to frighten."
coterminous
adj.相连的, 连接的
1. Having the same or coincident boundaries.
2. Having the same scope, range of meaning, duration.

As Ronald was fond of pointing out, in a democracy the interests of the people are, or at least should be, coterminous with those of the state.

Coterminous is from Latin conterminus, from com-, "together; with" + terminus, "boundary."