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18 Cards in this Set

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What is the formal declaration of an indexer?
[attributes] [access modifiers] indexer-declarator {accessor-declarations}
The indexer-declarator is a rather complex statement. Show its formal representation.
type this [formal-index-parameter-list]

OR

type interface-type.this [formal-index-parameter-list]
What are the allowed modifiers for an indexer?
private
public
internal
protected
new
There are 5.
What are accessors?
use get and set as with properties.
How are property values set and retrieved.
Throught 'Accessors'. The get and set part of the property declaration.
What is the formal representation of a property?
[attributes] [modifiers] type identifier {accessor-declaration}
OR
[attributes] [modifiers] type interface-type, identifier {accessor-declaration}
Are properties variables?
No. Properties cannot be treated as variables. They cannot be passed as ref or out parameters.
How is a static property manifested?
A static property can only be accessed through a type name.
Can 'this' be used to access a static property?
No. Attempting to access a static property use 'this' is an error.
Using 'name' as the private member of a class, create a get accessor for name. 'name' is type string.
...
private string name;
public string Name
{
get
{
return name;
}
}
...
Using 'name' as the private member of a class, create a set accessor for name. 'name' is type string.
...
private string name;
public string Name
{
set
{
name = value;
}
}
...
How is a read-only property created?
Declare only the 'get' accessor.
How do you create a write-only property? Why would you want to?
Create only the 'set' accessor.
To build an internal use counter, for example.
Why not modify the value of a property in the 'set' accessor?
This is considered bad practice as it will probably result in strang and mysterious bugs. Not to mention it my be hard to understand.
Why not modify the value of a property in the 'set' accessor?
This is considered bad practice as it will probably result in strang and mysterious bugs. Not to mention it my be hard to understand.
Create an interface property called 'ITarsalFormula' having public property 'int tFormula'.
public interface ITarsalFormula
{
//tarsal formula interface
int tFormula
{
get;
set;
}
}
If a class is inheriting from two interfaces and both have the property 'Length' (for example), how must you reference the 'Length' property in your code?
You must use the fully qualified reference.
Is the order of the 'get' and 'set' accessors within the property declaration important?
No. They may appear in either order.