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88 Cards in this Set

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identify in writing the goal of the need satisfaction selling process
The goal of the need satisfaction selling process is to make informed, mutually beneficial decisions
identify in writing the definition of a need in accordance with Achieve Global Professional Selling Skills course
need is a customer's desire to improve or accomplish something.
, identify in writing when a customer has a need in accordance with Achieve Global Professional Selling Skills course
You can be reasonably sure a customer has a need when he or she uses the language of needs.
identify in writing what is the language of needs in accordance with Achieve Global Professional Selling Skills course
The language of needs are words and phrases that express desire.
identify in writing the importance of listening for the language of needs
> If you don't, you might make unwarranted assumptions about what a customer is looking for and waste time talking about things that he or she isn't interested in.
identify in writing the four skills in the need satisfaction selling process
The four skills in the need satisfaction selling process are opening, probing, supporting, and closing
identify in writing the goal of an opening
The goal of opening a call is to reach agreement with the customer on what will be covered or accomplished during the call.
identify in writing when to use an opening
open a call when you and the customer are ready to conduct business
identify in writing the three components of an opening
 To open a call you propose an agenda, state the value (of the agenda) to the customer, and check for acceptance
identify in writing why to propose an agenda in an opening
This sets a clear direction for your conversation and lets you establish a focus on the customer
in writing why to state the value to the customer in an opening
This lets the customer know how the meeting will be useful to him or her and further establishes a focus on the customer.
identify in writing why to check for acceptance in an opening
You'll want to make sure the customer accepts the agenda you've proposed and doesn’t have anything to add.It also gives you the information you need to use your own and the customer's time productively and ensures that you and the customer move forward together.
identify in writing why to position an opening
Positioning your opening statement helps you make a smooth transition from small talk to business.
identify in writing the two questions salespeople should ask themselves when preparing to open a sales call
What might the customer want to accomplish by meeting with me?

What do I want to accomplish by meeting with this customer?
identify in writing the goal of probing
Your goal in probing is to build a clear, complete, mutual understanding of a customer’s needs.
identify in writing what is meant by a clear understanding of a customers need
A clear understanding means that, for each customer need you discuss, you know: specifically what the customer wants and why it's important.
identify in writing what is meant by a complete understanding of a customers need
A complete understanding means that, for the particular buying decision the customer is making, you know: all of the customer's needs and the priority of those needs
identify in writing what is meant by a mutual understanding of a customers need
A mutual understanding means that you and the customer share the same understanding.
identify in writing the importance of a clear, complete, mutual understanding of a customers need
Having a clear, complete, mutual understanding of your customer's needs will ensure that the recommendations you make to address those needs contribute to the customer's success in the most effective way possible
identify in writing when to probe
You probe when you want to elicit information from a customer.
identify in writing how to probe
You use open and closed probes to explore the customer's circumstances and needs
identify in writing what are considered as customer
circumstances
identify in writing what are considered as customer
circumstances
identify in writing the importance for exploring customer circumstances
Often, knowing about the customer's circumstances helps you understand why a customer has a need.
identify in writing why the customers need behind the need is important
The need behind the need is usually a larger goal the customer wants to accomplish.
identify in writing the importance of probing the need behind the need
identify in writing the importance of probing the need behind the need
identify in writing the importance of using open probes
Open probes encourage customers to respond freely.
identify in writing the three reasons for using closed probes
Use a closed probe when you want to limit a customer's response to a "yes" or "no", a choice of alternatives that you supply, or a single, often quantifiable, fact
identify in writing the dangers of relying on the use of open probes
If you rely exclusively on open probes, your discussion may lack focus and may not be an efficient use of time
identify in writing the dangers of relying on the use of closed probes
If you rely too heavily on closed probes, the customer may feel as if he or she is being interrogated and become unwilling to share information
identify in writing when to use open probes
You use open probes when you want to gather information about a customer's circumstances

> to uncover needs
> to encourage a customer to elaborate on something he or she said.
identify in writing the three ways to use closed probes
> To obtain specific information about a customer's circumstances or needs.
> To confirm your understanding of what a customer has said.
> To confirm that a customer has a need.
identify in writing how to confirm an understanding of what a customer has said
You confirm your understanding by summarizing what you've heard and using a closed probe to elicit a "yes" or "no" response from the customer.
identify in writing the importance of confirming a customers need
It's important because you want to use the time you spend with customer's addressing needs - things that are important to the customer and that they have a desire to do something about.
identify in writing how to confirm a customers need
To confirm that a customer has a need, use a closed probe that contains the language of needs and elicits a "yes" or "no" response.
identify in writing the goal of supporting
Your goal in supporting is to help a customer understand the specific ways in which your product or organization can satisfy a need that he or she has expressed
identify in writing the definition of a feature
A feature is a characteristic of a product or organization.
identify in writing the definition of a benefit
A benefit is what a feature means to a customer.
identify in writing when to support
> You support when:

> the customer has expressed a need.
> you both clearly understand the need.
> you know how your product/organization can address the need.
identify in writing the three components of supporting
> Acknowledge the need.
> Describe relevant features and benefits.
> Check for acceptance.
identify in writing the importance for acknowledging a customers need
It shows the customer that you understand and respect his or her needs. It also prepares the customer to hear what your product and organization have to offer and encourages him or her to share additional needs.
identify in writing the importance for describing relevant features and benefits
When you support, you want to describe only those features and benefits that address the particular need you're supporting.
identify in writing why to check for acceptance when supporting
You don't want to move ahead until you know that your explanation was understood and the benefits you described have been accepted.
identify in writing the two ways for checking for acceptance when supporting
> You can check for acceptance verbally.
or
> You can check for acceptance by making eye contact with the customer and assessing his or her reaction to the information you've provided, and respond accordingly.
identify in writing the three questions salespeople should ask themselves before supporting
> Has the customer actually expressed a need?
and
> Do both the customer and I clearly understand the "what" and "why" of the need?
and
> Do I know how my product and organization can satisfy the need?
identify in writing the goal of closing
Your goal in closing is to reach agreement with the customer on the appropriate next steps, if any, for moving a mutually beneficial decision forward.
identify in writing when to close
> You close when the customer signals a readiness to move ahead.
or
> The customer has accepted the benefits you've described
identify in writing the three components of a close
> Review previously accepted benefits.
> Propose next steps for you and the customer.
> Check for acceptance.
identify in writing the importance of reviewing previously accepted benefits during a close
Reviewing previously accepted benefits reminds the customer of the good things that he or she can look forward to if a purchase is made and lets you convey your confidence in the wisdom of moving ahead.
identify in writing the importance of proposing, "next step(s)" in a close
Specifying what you'd like the customer to do next ensures that he or she is clear about the commitment you're asking him or her to make. Saying what you'll do next demonstrates your commitment to working with the customer
identify in writing the importance of checking for acceptance in a close
After proposing next steps, you check for acceptance to make sure the customer accepts the plan you've outlined.
identify in writing what to do when a customer stalls in response to a close
When a customer stalls in response to your close, probe to find out why. If the customer is willing to move forward but at a slower pace, try to get the best commitment the customer is willing and able to make that day.
identify in writing what to do when a customer gives a final, "no" to a close
> Thank the customer for taking the time to meet with you.
> If appropriate, ask for feedback.

> If you think there's a potential for future business and you want to maintain a presence with the customer, ask permission to stay in touch.
identify in writing the reasons customers are indifferent
> Customers are indifferent because they're using (and satisfied with) a competitor's product or an internally supplied service.
> They don't realize that it's possible to improve their circumstances.
> They don't see the importance of making an improvement in their current circumstances.
identify in writing when indifference is encountered
You've encountered indifference when a customer expresses satisfaction with his or her circumstances.
identify in writing the three components of resolving a customers indifference
> Acknowledge the customer's point of view.
> Request permission to probe.
> Probe to create customer awareness of needs.
identify in writing what is accomplished by acknowledging the customers indifferent point of view
Customers who are satisfied with things as they are may fear that you'll try to sell them something they don't need. You can reassure a customer that this is not your intent by conveying that you understand and respect his or her point of view.
identify in writing how to request permission to probe an indifferent customer
You request permission to probe by making an opening statement with a limited agenda.
identify in writing the purpose of probing to
Create awareness of needs with an indifferent customer
Your purpose in probing is to build the customer's awareness of things that he or she might want to improve or accomplish - and that you can help improve or accomplish.
identify in writing how to probe indifferent customers for awareness of needs
> You explore the customer's circumstances for opportunities and effects.
and
> Confirm the existence of a need.
identify in writing what to probe for when exploring customer circumstances with indifferent customers
Specifically, you probe for opportunities.
identify in writing the definition of an opportunity
An opportunity is the potential for your product or organization to improve or accomplish something.
identify in writing why to explore customer circumstances for opportunities
You gather specific information that would indicate a problem or condition that could be addressed by your product or organization.
identify in writing the two questions a salesperson should ask themselves when preparing probes to determine if an opportunity exists with an indifferent customer
> What condition(s) or problem(s) might exist in a customer's circumstances if he or she weren't enjoying this benefit?
> What could I ask to find out if these conditions or problems exist?
identify in writing how to determine effects in exploring customer circumstances with an indifferent customer
To determine the effects, you can ask about the customer's feelings or opinions regarding the consequences, impact, results, or lack of results caused by the condition or problem you've identified.
identify in writing the two ways probing for effects help the salesperson with an indifferent customer
Probing about effects helps you in two ways. It gives you a sense of the importance of the condition or problem in the customer's eyes. It also heightens the customer's awareness of the consequences of leaving his or her circumstances unchanged.
identify in writing the three types of customer concerns
> Skepticism
> Misunderstanding
> Drawback
identify in writing when skepticism has been encountered
You've encountered skepticism when a customer expresses doubt that your product or organization will do what you've said it will do.
identify in writing when a misunderstanding has been encountered
Some concerns arise because a customer has incomplete or incorrect information about your product or organization. You've encountered a misunderstanding when a customer thinks you can't provide a particular feature or benefit when, in fact, you can.
identify in writing when a drawback has been encountered
When a customer has a complete, correct understanding of your product or organization but is dissatisfied with the presence or absence of a feature or benefit, you’re dealing with a drawback.
identify in writing when to probe to understand a customer concern
When you're not 100 percent sure of what kind of concern you're dealing with,probe until you are sure. Even when you do know which type of concern you're encountering, it may be important to probe for a fuller understanding of the concern before responding.
identify in writing the similarity between skepticism and misunderstandings
Skepticism and misunderstandings are similar in one respect; in both cases the customer has a need that can be satisfied by your product or organization.
identify in writing the three components of resolving skepticism
> Acknowledge the concern
> Offer relevant proof
> Check for acceptance
identify in writing the importance of acknowledging the concern
In responding to any concern, it's useful to let the customer know that you understand and respect it.
identify in writing how to offer proof to a skeptical customer
You offer proof by providing evidence that your product or organization does have the feature and/or does provide the benefit you've described.
identify in writing what is considered as relevant proof
Relevant proof is proof that addresses the specific feature or benefit the customer is skeptical about
identify in writing the importance of checking for acceptance when resolving skepticism
After offering proof, it's important to make sure the customer accepts it.
identify in writing what to do when a customer rejects the proof offered
If the customer rejects your proof, probe to find out why and, if possible, offer a different source of proof. Or ask the customer what kind of evidence would be acceptable.
identify in writing the two components of resolving a misunderstanding
> Confirm the need behind the concern.

> Support the need:
Acknowledge the need.
Describe relevant features and benefits.
Check for acceptance.
identify in writing the importance of probing to confirm the need behind the concern
The first step in addressing a misunderstanding is to turn it around - that is, to get the need behind the concern expressed as a need (something the customer desires)rather than as a problem (something that's wrong with your product or organization).
identify in writing what to do when the need behind the concern has been confirmed
> Once you've confirmed the need behind the concern, you may need to probe further about the "what" and "why" of the need - to be sure you have a clearm understanding before you support.Once you have a clear understanding of the need, you proceed as you would with any need you can satisfy: that is, you support it by acknowledging the need, describing relevant features and benefits, and checking for acceptance.
identify in writing the importance of probing the need behind the drawback
When you encounter a drawback, it's particularly important to probe to understand the need(s) behind it - what the customer wants and why. Even though you can't provide the particular feature or benefit the customer is looking for, you can still position your response to show that the features and benefits you do provide contribute to the overall results that he or she is looking for.
identify in writing the four components required to resolve a drawback
> Acknowledge the concern.
> Refocus on the bigger picture.
> Outweigh the drawback with previously accepted benefits.
> Check for acceptance.
identify in writing why to focus on the bigger picture
You want to help the customer put the drawback in perspective - to consider it within the broader context of his or her other needs.
identify in writing the importance of avoiding the word, "but" between acknowledging and re-focusing
If you say "but," the customer may feel that you're minimizing the importance of his or her concern. Instead, use words and phrases like "and," "it's also true, "let's look at," or "let's consider." Or simply ask the customer's permission to step back and consider the bigger picture.
identify in writing how to outweigh a drawback
You can sometimes outweigh a drawback by reviewing the benefits the customer has already accepted.
identify in writing the importance of outweighing a drawback with a previously accepted benefit
This helps the customer weigh the important needs that will be satisfied by your product or organization against the need(s) that won't.
identify in writing what to do after responding to a drawback
responding to a drawback, check for acceptance.
identify in writing what to do when a drawback is unable to be outweighed by previously accepted benefits
> When you can't outweigh a drawback, you'll want to probe to uncover additional needs you can support with additional benefits. To do this, proceed as you do when a customer expresses indifference at the beginning of a call. You:
> Acknowledge the customer's point of view.
> Request permission to probe.
> Probe to create customer awareness of needs.