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7 Cards in this Set

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laternal nucleus (LA)
a nucleus of the amygdala that receives sensory information from the neocortex, thalamus, and hippocampus and sends projections to the basal, accessory basal, and central nucleus of the amygdala.
central nucleus (CE)
the region of the ammygdala that receives information from the basal, lateral, and accessory basal nuclei and sends projections to a wide variety of regions in the brain; involved in emotional responses
conditioned emotional response
a classically conditioned response that occurs when a neutral stimulus is followed by an aversive stimulus; usually includes autonomic, behavioral, and endocrine components such as changes in heart rate, freezing, and secretion of stress-related hormones
ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)
The region of the prerontal cortex at the base of the anterior frontal lobes, adjacent to the midline; plays an inhibitory role in the expression of emotions
volitional facial paresis
difficulty in moving the famcial muscles voluntarily; caused by damage to the face region of the primary motor cortex or its subcortical connections
emotional facial paresis
lack of movement of facial muscles in response to emotions in people who have no difficulty moving these muscles voluntarily; caused by damage to the insular prefrontal cortex, subcortical white matter of the frontal lobe, or parts of the thalamus
Satire
A mode of writing based on ridicule, which criticizes the foibles and follies of society without necessarily offering a solution. Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels is an example)