Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/24

Click to flip

24 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Disease
is any change, other than an injury, that disrupts the normal functions of the body.
pathogens
Disease-causing agents
“sickness-makers.”
Germ theory of disease
The observations of Pasteur and Koch led them to conclude that infectious diseases were caused by microorganisms of different types, commonly called germs.
Koch's postulates
Koch developed a series of rules still used today to identify the microorganism that causes a specific disease.
vector
Animals that carry pathogens from person to person
antibiotic
compounds that kill bacteria without harming the cells of the human or animal hosts.
immunity
The function of the immune system is to fight infection through the production of cells that inactivate foreign substances or cells.
inflammatory response
a nonspecific defense reaction to tissue damage caused by injury or infection.
fever
The immune system also releases chemicals that increase the core body temperature
interferon
virus-infected cells produce a group of proteins that help other cells resist viral infection.
immune response
If a pathogen is able to get past the body's nonspecific defenses, the immune system reacts with a series of specific defenses that attack the particular disease-causing agent.
antigen
A substance that triggers this response
humoral immunity
cells of the immune system that recognize specific antigens are two types of lymphocytes: B lymphocytes (B cells) and T lymphocytes (T cells). B cells provide immunity against antigens and pathogens in the body fluids.
cell-mediated
T cells provide a defense against abnormal cells and pathogens inside living cells.
allergy
proteins that recognize and bind to antigens.
histamine
The activated mast cells release chemicals
allergy
The most common overreactions of the immune system to antigens
Asthma
chronic respiratory disease in which the air passages become narrower than normal
risk factor
anything that increases the chance of disease or injury.
carcinogen
Chemical compounds that are known to cause cancer
antibody
proteins that recognize and bind to antigens.
vaccination
The injection of a weakened or mild form of a pathogen to produce immunity
active immunity
The type of immunity produced by the body's reaction to a vaccine
passive immunity
If antibodies produced by other animals against a pathogen are injected into the bloodstream, the antibodies produce this against the pathogen.