Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/24

Click to flip

24 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
phonology
the sounds of a language and the study of these sounds
phonetics
study of the sounds of speech and not necessarily as members of a system
phonemics
study of the sounds of a given language as significantly contrasting members of a system
phonemes
members of the system
morphology
arrangement and relationships of the smallest meaningful units of language
morphemes
minimum units of meaning
free morphemes
morphemes that can be used alone as independent words (ex. take, for, each, panda)
bound morphemes
form words only when attached to other morphemes (ex. re-, dis-, -ed)
affixes
prefixes and suffixes, the most familiar bound morphemes
inflectional affixes
indicates a gramatical feature such as a number or tense
derivational affixes
may be either prefixes or suffixes
allomorph
different forms of a morpheme (same morpheme, different sounds)
lexical morphemes
content words with referents in the real world (ex. radio, swim)
functional morphemes
signal relationships with the language itself (ex. but, a, of)
syntax
arrangement of words into phrases, clauses, and sentences; word order
lexicon
list of all the morphemes in the language
semantics
study of meanings or all the meanings expressed by a language
graphics
linguistic term refers to the systematic representation of language in writing
grapheme
a single unit of graphics
fusion
merger of two formally distinct units (ex. h sound collapsed in f-words like rough, tough)
fission
split of a single unit into two distinct terms (ex. discret(e)->discrete and discreet)
outer history
events that have happened to the speakers of the language leading to changes in the language (ex. norman invasion)
inner history
changes that occur within the language itself, changes that cannot be attributed to external forces (long a become short o, ham and gat -> home and goat)
reflexes
descendant phonological changes