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24 Cards in this Set

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:verb
to make somebody or something weak
debilitate
from Lation "debilitare" meaning to weaking
:noun
1)intoxicated, drunk;
2)excited, exhilarated
inebriation
from Latin "inebriare" meaning "to make drunk in," from "ebriare" = "to make drunk"
verb
1 a : to renounce upon oath b : to reject solemnly
*2 : to abstain from : avoid
abjure
rom Latin "jurare," which means "to swear" (and which in turn is based on the root "jus," meaning "law"), plus the prefix "ab-," meaning "away."
noun
: lethargy, dullness
hebetude
from Late Latin "hebetudo," which means pretty much the same thing as our word. It is also closely related to the Latin word for "dull"—"hebes," which has extended meanings such as "obtuse," "doltish," and "stupid."
adjective
: marked by extreme calm, impassivity, and steadiness : serene
imperturbable
from the Latin "perturbare," also meaning "to throw into confusion," which in turn comes from the combination of "per-" and "turbare," which means "to disturb."
verb
1 : to lower in rank or reputation : degrade
*2 : to speak slightingly about : belittle
disparage
Disparage" derives from the Anglo-French "desparager," meaning "to marry below one’s class." "Desparager," in turn, combines the negative prefix "des-" with "parage"("equality" or "lineage"), which itself comes from "per," meaning "peer."
adjective
*1 : characterized by straightness or moral integrity
2 : piously self-righteous
recitudinous
from the Late Latin "rectitudin-" (English added the "-ous" ending), which is, in turn, ultimately derived from the Latin word "rectus," meaning both "straight" and "right." (There are other "rectus" descendants in English, including "rectitude," of course, and "rectilinear," "rectangle," and "rectify.")
noun
: peanut
goober
It's a regional term, used mainly in the southern and east-central part of the United States. But the plant didn't originate in the U.S.; it's actually native to South America. It was taken from there to Africa, where the local people gave new names to the high-protein legumes.
noun
*1 : whatever makes something the type that it is : essence
2 a : a trifling point : quibble b : crotchet, eccentricity
quiddity
the Latin pronoun "quis," which is one of two Latin words for "who" (the other is "qui"). "Quid," the neuter form of "quis," gave rise to the Medieval Latin "quidditas," which means "essence"
noun plural
: jitters, nervousness
jimjams
adj.
:extremely unhappy and discouraged
despondent
verb
1 a : to renounce upon oath b : to reject solemnly
*2 : to abstain from : avoid
abjure
Latin "jurare," which means "to swear" (and which in turn is based on the root "jus," meaning "law"), plus the prefix "ab-," meaning "away."
adjective
: equivalent in value, significance, or effect
tantamount
from the Anglo-French phrase "tant amunter," meaning "to amount to as much;" "tant," meaning "so much" or "as much," and "amounter," meaning "to ascend" or "to add up to." also, in Spanish, tanto means "as much"
adjective
1 : utterly finished, defeated, or destroyed
*2 : unable to function : useless
3 : hopelessly outmoded
kaput
adjective
: habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition
froward
opposite of toward = go away... in Middle English; aka to & fro
noun
1 capitalized : a native or inhabitant of a vast historical region in Asia and Eastern Europe roughly extending from the Sea of Japan to the Dnieper
*2 capitalized : a person of irritable or violent temper
3 : one that proves to be unexpectedly formidable
tartar
came from the Eurasian people known as the Tartars = decendants of the Mongols who were "ferocious"
adjective
1 : of or relating to a sensory threshold
*2 : barely perceptible
3 : of, relating to, or being an intermediate state, phase, or condition : in-between, transitional
liminal
from the Latin noun "limen," meaning "threshold." closely related to subliminal = below what is conscious
verb
: report, rumor -- usually used with "about"
bruit
noun
: a fit or state of indignation
dudgeon
adjective
: having or expressing little or no sensibility : unemotional
stolid
from "stolidus," a word that means "dull" or "stupid" in Latin
noun
: a formal acknowledgment of personal fault or error
mea culpa
means "through my fault" in Latin, comes from a prayer of confession in the Catholic church; it's an exclamation of apology or remorse that is used to mean "It was my fault" or "I apologize." "culpa" has been used to mean "guilt" in English = culprit
noun
1 : a sprinkling with water especially in religious ceremonies
2 *a : a false or misleading charge meant to harm someone's reputation b : the act of making such a charge : defamation; innuendo
aspersion
from the Latin word "aspersus," itself a derivative of the verb "aspergere," which means "to sprinkle" or "to scatter."
adjective
: notably polite or polished in manner
urbane
to the Latin "urbs," meaning "city"
noun
: regions or countries lying to the west of a specified or implied point of orientation
Occident
from Latin "occidere," meaning "to fall," once referred to the part of the sky in which the sun goes down; used to refer to western Europe and the west half of the Roman Empire; it's opposite is "Orient" which comes from Latin "oriri" meaning "to rise" and therefore Japan is an Oriental country because it is the land of the rising, morning sun :D