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82 Cards in this Set

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abbreviate
shorten, abridge - to reduce (anything) in length, duration, etc.; make briefer: to abbreviate a speech.
brevi(s) short
abstinence
act of refraining from -Abstinence implies the willful avoidance of pleasures, especially of food and drink, thought to be harmful or self-indulgent
present participle of abstinre, to hold back. See abstain.
abstract
not applied to actual objects - theoretical; not applied or practical - to make an abstract of; summarize
trahere, to draw
acquired
developed or learned; not naturally occuring - To get by one's own efforts
from Latin acqurere, to add to  : ad-, ad- + quaerere, to seek, get
adulation
high praise - to show excessive admiration or devotion to; flatter
ad- toward and indicated direction, tendency, or addition
aesthetic
having to do with the appreciation of beauty
affable
easy-going; friendly
af- var. of ad- before f - fr, to speak
alienated
removed or disassociated from (friends, family, or homeland)
ali-, base of alius other
alienate
To cause to become unfriendly or hostile
alleviate
to ease a pain or a burden
var. of ad- before l - levi(s) light, not heavy
alliance
a union of two or more groups
al- al- + ligāre to bind - see alloy and ligament
ambiguous
having several possible meanings or interpretations - lacking clearness or definiteness
ambi- both
ambivalent
simultaneously having opposing feelings; uncertainty, esp. when caused by inability to make a choice or by a simultaneous desire to say or do two opposite or conflicting things
valēns), prp. to be strong
amenable
ready or willing to answer, act, agree, or yield; open to influence, persuasion, or advice; agreeable
"able - a suffix meaning capable of, susceptible of, fit for, tending to, given to, associated in meaning with the word able, occurring in loanwords from Latin (laudable); used in English as a highly productive suffix to form adjectives by addition to stems of any origin (teachable; photographable)Also, -ble, -ible.
amicable
characterized by or showing goodwill; friendly; peaceable
amīc(us) friend, friendly
ample
describing a large amount of something - of adequate or more than adequate extent, size, or amount; large; spacious; roomy
amplus wide, large
anachronistic
something or someone that is not in its correct historical or chronological time, esp. a thing or person that belongs to an earlier time: The sword is an anachronism in modern warfare.
ana- “up,” “against,” “back,” chrono- “time,” -ic - used as an adjective-forming suffix with the particular senses “having some characteristics of” (opposed to the simple attributive use of the base noun) (balletic; sophomoric); “in the style of” (Byronic; Miltonic); “pertaining to a family of peoples or languages” (Finnic; Semitic; Turkic).
anecdote
short account of event
anonymous
of unknown name; lacking individuality, unique character, or distinction
an- “not,” “without,” “lacking”; -onym- word,” “name”; -ous - a suffix forming adjectives that have the general sense “possessing, full of” a given quality (covetous; glorious; nervous; wondrous)
antagonist
opponent
Gk agon struggle, contest (agony); anti- a prefix meaning “against,” “opposite of,” ; -ist a suffix of nouns, often corresponding to verbs ending in -ize or nouns ending in -ism, that denote a person who practices or is concerned with something, or holds certain principles, doctrines, etc.
anthology
a collection of literary pieces
logos Gk lógos a word, saying, speech, discourse, thought
apathetic
feeling or showing little emotion - not interested or concerned; indifferent or unresponsive
a- “not,” “without; Gk páthos suffering, sensation
apparatus
equipment; a group of machines
ap- variation of ad-;parāre to set, get ready;
apprehension
anxiety or fear about the future
"ap- variation of ad-; prehendere to seize; a suffix, appearing in words of Latin origin, denoting action or condition, used in Latin and in English to form nouns from stems of Latin adjectives (communion; union), verbs (legion; opinion), and esp. past participles (allusion; creation; fusion; notion; torsion).
arbiter
a judge who decides a disputed issue
arbitrary
determined by impulse rather than reason
ary - The suffix has the general sense “pertaining to, connected with” the referent named by the base; it is productive in English, sometimes with the additional senses “contributing to,” “for the purpose of,” and usually forming adjectives: complimentary; visionary; revolutionary; inflationary
archaic
characteristic of an earlier period; extremely old-fashioned
ic a suffix forming adjectives from other parts of speech, occurring originally in Greek and Latin loanwords (metallic; poetic; archaic; public) and, on this model, used as an adjective-forming suffix with the particular senses “having some characteristics of” (opposed to the simple attributive use of the base noun) (balletic; sophomoric); “in the style of” (Byronic; Miltonic); “pertaining to a family of peoples or languages” (Finnic; Semitic; Turkic). B30
arid
extremely dry - describing a dry, rainless climate
a suffix occurring in descriptive adjectives borrowed from Latin, often corresponding to nouns ending in -or1
assertion
a declaration or statement
L assertus joined to, defended, claimed
assiduous
hard-working
as- variation of ad-; + sed- (s. of sedēre to sit + ous-a suffix forming adjectives that have the general sense “possessing, full of” a given quality (covetous; glorious; nervous; wondrous);
Adversity
misfortune
vert- turn
assimilation
to absorb; to make similar
as- var. of ad- before s: assert. simil(is) like, similar; -ion a suffix, appearing in words of Latin origin, denoting action or condition, used in Latin and in English to form nouns from stems of Latin adjectives (communion; union), verbs (legion; opinion), and esp. past participles (allusion; creation; fusion; notion; torsion).
astute
shrewd; clever
asylum
sanctuary - a place of retreat or security
auspicious
favorable; promising
from auspex, auspic-, bird augur; -ous a suffix forming adjectives that have the general sense “possessing, full of” a given quality (covetous; glorious; nervous; wondrous)
austere
without decoration; strict
benevolent
friendly, helpful - well-meaning; generous
form of bene (adv.) well, akin to bonus good; vol- to wish; -ent - same as -ant; -ant -ant has the general sense “characterized by or serving in the capacity of” that named by the stem (ascendant; pretendant), esp. in the formation of nouns denoting human agents in legal actions or other formal procedures (tenant; defendant; applicant; contestant). In technical and commercial coinages, -ant is a suffix of nouns denoting impersonal physical agents (propellant; lubricant; deodorant).
benign
kind and gentle
form of bene (adv.) well, akin to bonus good; -ign gignere to beget
biased
prejudiced; a particular tendency or inclination, esp. one that prevents unprejudiced consideration of a question; prejudice.
brittle
easily broken when subjected to pressure
brusque
rudely abrupt
camaraderie
trust among friends
camouflage
to hide by blending in with surroundings
candor
sincerity; openness
capricious
impulsive and undpredictable
catalog
v: to make an itemized list of
caustic
bitingly sarcastic or witty
circuitous
indirect, roundabout
in a circular way
clandestine
secretive
clarity
clearness in thought or expression
from Latin clarus, clear, bright
cogent
convincing; reasonable
co- + ag-, s. of agere to drive; -ent - same as -ant; -ant -ant has the general sense “characterized by or serving in the capacity of” that named by the stem (ascendant; pretendant), esp. in the formation of nouns denoting human agents in legal actions or other formal procedures (tenant; defendant; applicant; contestant). In technical and commercial coinages, -ant is a suffix of nouns denoting impersonal physical agents (propellant; lubricant; deodorant).
coherent
logically connected
co- + haerēre to stick, cling; -ent - same as -ant; -ant -ant has the general sense “characterized by or serving in the capacity of” that named by the stem (ascendant; pretendant), esp. in the formation of nouns denoting human agents in legal actions or other formal procedures (tenant; defendant; applicant; contestant). In technical and commercial coinages, -ant is a suffix of nouns denoting impersonal physical agents (propellant; lubricant; deodorant).
cohesive
condition of sticking together
co- + haerēre to stick, cling; -ive a suffix of adjectives (and nouns of adjectival origin) expressing tendency, disposition, function, connection, etc.: active; corrective; destructive; detective; passive; sportive.
collaborate
to work together
col- var. of com- before l; com- a prefix meaning “with,” “together,” “in association,” and (with intensive force) “completely,” occurring in loanwords from Latin (commit): used in the formation of compound words before b, p, m: combine; compare; commingle; + labor work;
compassion
sympathy, mercy
; pas- Latin from pat, to suffer
compelling
forceful; urgently demanding attention
com- a prefix meaning “with” ; + pellere to push, drive
comprehensive
large in scope or context
compromise
to settle differences
conception
the ability to form or understand an idea
com- a prefix meaning “with” ; + pellere to push, drive
condemn
to express strong disapproval of; denounce
con- a variation of com- meaning "with " or "completely"; cep- variation of capere - to seize; -ion a suffix, appearing in words of Latin origin, denoting action or condition, used in Latin and in English to form nouns from stems of Latin adjectives (communion; union), verbs (legion; opinion), and esp. past participles (allusion; creation; fusion; notion; torsion).
condescending
treating people as weak or inferior
con- variation of com - meaning "with" or "completely"; L dē-, prefix - from, away from, of, out of; -scendere, form of scandere to climb
conditional
provisional, contingent
congregation
crowd of people
con- variation of com- meaning "with"; + greg- flock ;
consensus
general agreement
contemporary
current, modern; from the same time
con- variation of com- meaning "with" or "in association"+ tempor- time; -ize - “to convert into, give a specified character or form to” (computerize; dramatize; itemize; motorize), “to subject to (as a process, sometimes named after its originator)” (hospitalize; terrorize; galvanize; oxidize; simonize; winterize). Also formed with -ize are a more heterogeneous group of verbs, usually intransitive, denoting a change of state (crystallize), kinds or instances of behavior (apologize; moralize; tyrannize), or activities (economize; philosophize; theorize).
contemptuous
feeling hatred; scornful
contempt
context
circumstances of a situation; environment
convergence
joining of parts
con- variatio of com- meaning "with"; L vergere to turn, bend, be inclined;
conviction
a fixed or strong belief
convoluted
intricate; complex
con- variation of com- meaning "with"; + volvere to roll, turn, twist
copious
plentiful; having a large quantity
cordial
friendly; sincere
coup
a brilliantly executed plan
cryptic
difficult to comprehend
decorous
proper; marked by good taste
deleterious
harmful; having a harmful effect; injurious
derived
copied or adapted from a source
despotic
exercising absolute power; tyrannical
dictatorial
domineering, oppressively overbearing
diligent
hard-working
discredit
dishonor, disgrace
disdain
to regard with scorn - to look down on