• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/18

Click to flip

18 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
List the types of cardiac artifacts and describe their morphology.
Electrocardiographic -QRS complex seen in the scalp leads
Pacemaker- Generalized high frequency polyphasic potentials of short duration
Pulse- Periodic slow wave that occurs after the EKG artifact's peak by about 200 msec
Ballistocradiographic (results from head or body movement with cardiac contractions)- similar in morphology to pulse but more widespread
List the types of electrode artifacts and describe their morphology.
Electrode pop- very steep rise and a more shallow fall, resembles a calibration signal
Electrode Contact- sharp or slow waves of varying morphology and amplitude
Electrode/lead movement-disorganized morphology, double phase reversals on noncerebral appearance
Perspiration- low amplitude,
rolling waves of greater than 2 seconds in duration
Salt Bridge- low amplitude, typically only one channel, appears flat and close to isoelectric
List the types of external device artifacts and describe their morphology.
50/60 Hz ambient electrical noise-medium to low amplitude monomorphic activity of 50 to 60 Hz
Intravenous drips- spike -like EEG potential which has the regularity of the drip
Electrical devices; IV pumps, telephone, radio, TV - high amplitude, irregular, polyspike-like or spike-like activity
Mechanical effects: ventilators, circulatory pumps-slow wave or a complex including a mixture of frequencies superimposed on a slow wave
List the types of muscle artifacts and describe their morphology.
Glosskinetic (chew/swallow) - slowing with superimposed faster frequencies with maximal amplitude frontally
Photomyogenic (photomyoclonic) - frontal and periorbital time-locked artifact that occurs with photic stimulation
Surface electromyography (scalp/facial muscle) - rhythmic activity of high amplitude and frequency most commonly seen in the temporal and frontal electrodes.
List the types of ocular artifacts and describe their morphology.
Blink - bifrontal diphasic synchronous slow wave
Eye flutter - run of bifrontal spike and slow wave complexes
Lateral gaze- rhythmic slow artifact seen in the frontal and temporal leads at a frequency less that 1 Hz
Slow-Roving eye movements- low amplitude slowing of opposite polarity in the left and right frontotemporal regions
Lateral rectus spike - single motor unit potential seen at F7 or F8
Rapid eye movements of REM sleep - asymmetric waves with a quicker rise than fall
What EEG finding is most often associated with neonatal seizures due to interventricular hemorrhage, leukomalacia, infarcts?
positive central or temporal sharp waves
What EEG finding is most often associated with postnatal early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE) or neonatal myoclonic encephalopathy?
Burst suppression
What EEG finding is most often associated with infantile spasms?
hypsarrhythmia
What EEG finding is most often associated with Lennox-Gastault Syndrome?
1 to 2 Hz spike and wave complexes; aka, slow spike and wave
What EEG finding is most often associated with childhood absence epilepsy?
generalized 3 Hz spike and wave complexes
What interictal EEG finding are most often associated with generalized tonic-clonic seizures?
generalized spike and wave; paroxysmal fast activity
What EEG finding is most often associated with benign rolandic epilepsy?
central and temporal sharp waves that often have opposite polarity; a dipole is present
What EEG finding is most often associated with benign occipital epilepsy?
occipital sharp waves
What EEG finding is most often associated with versive or sensory seizures?
parietal sharp waves
What EEG finding is most often associated with focal motor seizures?
frontocentral sharp waves
What interictal EEG finding is most often associated with complex partial seizures?
temporal lobe sharp waves, especially from the anterior temporal area
What is the duration of a sharp wave?
70 to 200 msec
What is the duration of a spike?
Less than 70 msec