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58 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
I LOVE YOU LINDSEY
I LOVE YOU BABY GIRL
art as ritual, magic-national dosena of animals

Lacaux Caves (ex)
500 BC
Pre History
stylized


wall photos (ex)
3000-1500 BC
Egyptian
classical, proportions

Warrior,Parthenon (ex)
500-50 BC
formal, simplified/stylized figuresl, rich color


Risen Christ, Mosaics (ex)
5th c AD
religious art with symbolism

Duccio, Giotto
12-15 c
church-major art patron Natural observer, beauty, linear perspective, ideal man

Giotto, Michelangelo, Da Vinci
14-16 c
Renaissance
earthy, symbolism


Van Eyck, Durer (ex)
Northern Renaissance
exaggeration of space, light, elongation, figure, distort, proportion, perspective


El Greco, Tintoretto (ex)
Mannerism
late 16th c
drama, light, color, exaggeration, emotions

Brueghel, Velazquez, Rembrandt (ex)
Baroque 17th c
revival classical greek, intellectual formula

David (ex)
late 18th c
Neo Classical
intense emotion, literary subjects, nature forces, exotic danger

Delacroix, Turner, Blake (ex)
18-19th c
Romanticism
ordinary subjects/people, representational

Eakins (ex)
Mid 19th c
Realism
light, color, brushstroke, "the moment"

Degas, Monet, Renroir (ex)
late 19th c
Impressionism
formal and expressive

Seurat, Van Gough (ex)
late 19th c
Post-impressionism
market by abstraction and rapid change in styles
20th c
French Revolution
1789
Industrial Revolution
19th c
First Photograph
1826
World War One
1914-1919
World War Two
1941-1945
Freud
1900
Wright Brothers
1903
Einstein's theory of relativity
1905
Renaissance
14-16th c
Giotto
1301
Baroque
17th and early 18th c
Neo-Classical
early 18th c
Romantic
mid to late 18th c
Realism
early 19th c
Impressionism
1870-1880's
Post-impressionism
late 19th c
emotional, bold colors and flat shapes

Roualt, Matisse (ex)
early 20th c
Expressionism
presentation of multiple views

Picasso (ex)
early 20th c
Cubism
Dream-like

Chagall, Dali (ex)
20th c
Surrealism
viewer interprets, simplified/changed

Brancusi, Kandinsky (ex)
mid 20th c
Abstract Expressionism
large color areas

Rothko, Frankenthaler (ex)
1960's
Color Field/ Minimalism
objective from popular culture

Warhol, Oldenburg
1960's
Pop Art
optical illusions

Stella
1960's
Op Art
photo exactness, acrylic, airbrush

Estes, Hanson
1980's
Photo-realism
Post-Modern
a visual path of action; straight, broken, curvilinear

a) diagonal implies motion
b) vertical-alertness
c) horizontal-calm
line
a two-dimesional area or space defined by a line or changes in value and color
a)organic-natural, irregular
b)geometric-man-made, triangle, circle, and rectangle
c)positive
d)negative-background space
shape
the radiant energy which makes everything we see visible
light
the relative lightness and darkness of tones and colors. Gradations of value on an object give it a sense of mass or 3-D quality
value
effect on our eyes of light waves of differing wavelength or frequencies
color
the tactile quality of a surface (actual) or the representation or invention of the appearance of such a surface quality (implied)
texture
three-dimensional form having physical bulk.
mass
the indefinable, great, general, receptacle of all things--the void

a)linear perspective-lines converges on vanishing point to imply depth
b)atmospheric perspective-foreground objects are more detailed, larger, with more contrast; background is grayed, smaller, and less detailed
c)aerial-above looking down
d)worms-looking from below
e)size or scale change
f)position
g)overlap
h)foreshortening
i)warm/cool
space
a non-spatial continuum in which events occur in succession. can also refer to time of day or season
time
actual or implied change of position. Diagonal lines, blue, and suspension are ways to show motion. Directional force will also move viewer's eyes through composition.
motion
center of interest that focuses viewer's attention
a)contrast
b)isolation
c)centrality
d)directional force
e)color intensity
emphasis (focal point)
interaction of any contradictory elements such as line, texture, or value
contrast
ordered relationship of opposing forces

a)symmetrical-distribution of somee or similar parts on either side of central axis
b)asymmetrical-felt or implied center of gravity brings opposing or dissimilar elements into equilibrium
c)radial- circular design
balance
implied or actual line produces directional forces which determine basic structure of work. Person's glance or line up of objects is implied directional force
directional force
appearance of oneness in composition; what makes the individual parts work together
unity
recurrence of design elements, can create pattern or be seemingly random or irregular
repitition
refers to size in comparison to the size of a constant/ one object compared to another object (pencil to person)
scale
size relationship of parts to a whole and to one another (head to body, or facial features to head)
proportion