Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/49

Click to flip

49 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Reverence for beauty; movement that held beautiful form is to be valued more than instructive content.
aestheticism
A word, phrase or attitude that has double or even multiple meanings, resulting in multiple interpretations.
ambiguity
The pervasive mood or tone of a literary work.
Atmosphere.
The author's viewpoint regarding his subject matter. Attitude can usually be detected in author's tone.
Attitude
A grand and exuberently ornamental style
baroque
an adherence to the principals of Greek and Roman literature.
Classicism
words or phrases that are used in everyday conversation or informal writing which are usually considered inappropriate for a formal essay.
Colloquialisms
the range of further associations that a word or phrase suggests in addition to its straightforward disctionary meaning.
Connotation
a device of style of subject matter so often used that it becomes a recognized means of expression.
convention
the precise literal meaning of a word, without emotional associations or overtones.
denotation
philosophy that suggests people's actions and all other events are determined by forces over which human beings have no control
determinism
the version of a language spoken by people of a particular region or social group.
dialect
the conversation of two or more people as represented in writing.
dialogue
violently bitter verbal attack
diatribe
the choice of words used in a literary work
diction
a portion of a written work that interupts or pauses the development of the theme or plot.
digression
the use of a quotation at the beginning or a work that hints at its theme.
epigraph
a philosophical movement that focuses on the individual human being's experience of, recognition or meaningless existence
existentialism
presents life not as it appears on the surface, but as it is passionately felt to be by an author or character
expressionism
a way of presenting scenes or incidents that took place before the opening scene.
flashback
the pursuit of pleasure above all else.
hedonism
a conclusion the reader can draw based upon details presented by the author.
inference
direct denunciation or name-calling.
invective
a situation in which the audience knows more about the character's situation than the character does.
dramatic irony
the contrast between what is intended or expected and what actually occurs.
situational irony
a contrast between what is said and what is meant
verbal irony
in its broadest sense, the incongruity or diff between reality and appearance
irony
the special language of a profession or group
jargon
the side by side comparison of two or more object
juxtaposition
the use of the physical setting, dialect, customs, and attitudes in a region
local color
the comic substituion of one word for another similar in sound but different in meaning
malapropism
the speed at which an author tells a story
narrative pace
style of writing that rejects idealized portrayals of life and attempts complete accuracy, disinterested objectivity, brutal struggle for survival
naturalism
the prevailing emotional attitude in a literary work
mood
the identification of god with the universe
pantheism
the belief that nature provides a truer and more healthful model than culture; the noble savage
primitivism
pen name, alias
pseudonym
an author's use of accuracy in the portrayal of life or reality
realism
the tendency in literature to focus on a specific greographic region
regionalism
literature depicting emotion matter in an imaginative form
romanticism
harsh cutting personal remarks not necessarily ironic
sarcasm
any form of literature that blends ironic humor and wit with criticism. seeks to correct through ridicule
satire
a technique that allow the reader to see the continuous chaotic flow of half formed thoughts
stream-of-conciousness
employs illogical and dreamlike images to suggest the unconcious
surrealism
the reflection in a work of the author's attitude toward his or her subject
tone
the american version of romanticsm. opposed to puritanism
transcendtalism
the quality of onesness in a literary work
unity
the sense a written work conveys to a reader of the writer's attitude, personality and character
voice
ingenuity in connecting amusingly incongruous ideas, intelledt, humor
wit