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13 Cards in this Set

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Mesothelium seen as if looking down on a surface view to see "pavement" effect of the lining cells. Silver stains the intercellular cement dark between adjacent cells. Notice how corrugated the cell membranes are. Mesothelium = the simple squamous epithelium lining body cavities and mesenteries.
What is this?
High power view of endothelial cells lining a small blood vessel cut in cross-section. (You see just the nuclei - the cytoplasm between them is extremely flat.) Endothelium = the simple squamous epithelium lining blood vessels.
What kind of cells?
Simple cuboidal epithelium lining a tubule (longitudinal cut). Some of the cell boundaries between "blocks" or "cubes" here are quite distinct.
What kind of cells are these?
Simple cuboidal epithelium in Mallory stain (longitudinal cut). Note the dark chromatin clumps in the nuclei. Underneath the epithelium lies a small blood vessel filled with orange-colored blood cells.
What kind of cells are these?
Cross-section of tubules. The smaller ones clustered in the center and upper left are lined by simple squamous epithelium. The larger pink tubules have simple cuboidal epithelium.
A.What are the smaller cells clustered in the center and upper left?
B. What are the larger pink cells?
Simple columnar epithelium with very regular line-up of nuclei.
What are these cells?
Simple columnar cells cut tangentially to show how they form a very regular "pavement" when viewed from the surface. The cells are like tall blocks arranged very closely to each other with a small amount of tissue fluid in between.
What kind of cells are these?
EM of cells with striated border. Notice the evenness and regularity of the microvilli. This is an adaptation of the cell surface for absorption. Notice also the corrugation of the cell boundaries as they fit next to each other. 1= nucleus; 2=brush border (microvilli); 3=lymphocyte.
What are 1, 2 and 3?
Pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium from the trachea. Nuclei are at different levels. All cells touch the basement membrane, but only the taller cells reach the lumen. The cilia are longer and less regular than the microvilli of a striated border.
What kind of cells are these?
Pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with pale goblet cells. The different levels of nuclei are clearer here. Again, notice the wavy-looking cilia.
What kind of cells?
Transitional epithelium of the urinary bladder, low power view. It is a stratified epithelium with several layers of cells.
What kind of cells are these?
Transitional epithelium, high power. Notice many layers of cells -- and the typically puffy surface cells. The bladder is contracted so the epithelium is thick. If the bladder were stretched, the epithelium would be thinner.
What kind of cells are these?
Stratified squamous epithelium with beginning surface cornification. This section is from thin skin, which has a dry surface covered with dead cells. Notice how flat the surface cells are and how dark and pyknotic their nuclei have become. Again, notice the distinct row of basal cells.
What kind of cells are these