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17 Cards in this Set

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semelparity
A life history in which adults have but a single reproductive opportunity to produce large numbers of offspring, such as the life history of the Pacific salmon. Also known as "big-bang reproduction."
endoparasites
Parasites that live within a host.
carrying capacity
The maximum population size that can be supported by the available resources, symbolized as K.
big-bang reproduction
A life history in which adults have but a single reproductive opportunity to produce large numbers of offspring, such as the life history of the Pacific salmon. Also known as semelparity.

bottom-up model
A model of community organization in which mineral nutrients control community organization because nutrients control plant numbers, which in turn control herbivore numbers, which in turn control predator numbers.
zero population growth
A period of stability in population size when the per capita birth rates and death rates are equal.
interspecific competition
Competition for resources between plants, between animals, or between decomposers when resources are in short supply.
Top-Down Model
A model of community organization in which predation controls community organization because predators control herbivores, which in turn control plants, which in turn control nutrient levels; also called the trophic cascade model.
individualistic hypothesis
The concept, put forth by H.A. Gleason, that a plant community is a chance assemblage of species found in the same area simply because they happen to have similar biotic requirements.
cryptic coloration
Camouflage, making potential prey difficult to spot against its background.
ectoparasites
Parasites that feed on the external surface of a host.
Müllerian mimicry
A mutual mimicry by two unpalatable species.
energetic hypothesis

length of a food chain is limited by the inefficiency of energy transfer along the chain.
interactive hypothesis
The concept, put forth by F.E. Clements, that a community is an assemblage of closely linked species, locked into association by mandatory biotic interactions that cause the community to function as an integrated unit, a sort of superorganism.
clumped
Describing a dispersion pattern in which individuals are aggregate in patches.
competitive exclusion principle
The concept that when populations of two similar species compete for the same limited resources, one population will use the resources more efficiently and have a reproductive advantage that will eventually lead to the elimination of the other population.
Batesian mimicry
A type of mimicry in which a harmless species looks like a species that is poisonous or otherwise harmful to predators.