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6 Cards in this Set

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Battle of Cannae
The Battle of Cannae was a major battle of the Second Punic War, taking place on August 2, 216 BC near the town of Cannae in Apulia in southeast Italy. The Carthaginian army under Hannibal destroyed a numerically superior Roman army under command of the consuls Lucius Aemilius Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro. Following the Battle of Cannae, Capua and several other Italian city-states defected from the Roman Republic. Although the battle failed to decide the outcome of the war in favour of Carthage, it is today regarded as one of the greatest tactical feats in military history
Battle of Zama
the battle in 202 BC in which Scipio decisively defeated Hannibal at the end of the second Punic War
BMarcus Junius Brutus
Marcus Junius Brutus, 85? B.C.–42 B.C. He and Caius Cassius Longinus (see under Cassius) were the principal assassins of Julius Caesar. He had sided with Pompey, but after the battle of Pharsalus, Caesar pardoned him, made him governor of Cisalpine Gaul (46 B.C.), and, in 44 B.C., urban praetor. Nevertheless, he joined Cassius in the plot against Caesar. After the murder of Caesar, Brutus went east and, in the republican cause, joined Cassius and held Macedonia with him. Late in 42 B.C., Octavian (later Augustus) and Antony arrived, and a battle was fought at Philippi. When it went against the republicans, Brutus committed suicide.
Sulla
Roman general and dictator (82–79) who marched on Rome and seized power from his political rival Marius (88).
Gaius Marius
Roman general and politician. Elected consul seven times, he reformed the military and lost a disastrous civil war (88) to his political rival Sulla.
Roman Legions
RL was the basic military unit of the ancient Roman army. It consisted of a core of heavy infantry, with auxiliary cavalry and ranged troops, typically skirmishers. The size of a typical legion varied widely throughout the history of ancient Rome, from the small agile legions of Julius Caesar (about 3,500 infantry strong), to the more typical legions of the middle Roman Republic (5,000 to 6,000 infantry strong), to the large legions of the later Roman Empire (about 8,000 infantry strong). As legions were not standing armies until the Marian reforms (c. 107 BC), and were instead created, used, and disbanded again, several hundred Legions were named and numbered throughout Roman history. To date, about 50 have been identified. In the time of the Roman Empire, there were usually about 28 standing Legions plus their Auxiliaries, with more raised as needed or as able.
Due to the enormous military successes of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire the legion has long been regarded as the prime ancient model for military efficiency and ability.