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77 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Primary Prevention (Chp. 14)
Any intervention that prevents a disease or condition from occuring
Quality of Life
A person's well-being a life satisfaction
Quaternary Prevention (Chp. 14)
Efforts specifically aimed at improving the functional capacities of people who have chronic conditions.
Secondary Prevention (Chp. 14)
Instituted early after a condition has begun, but may not yet have been diagnosed and before significant impairments have occurred.
Tertiary Prevention (Chp. 14)
Involves efforts to avoid the development of complications or secondary chronic conditions, manage the pain associated with the primary chronic condition and sustain life through medical intervention.
Active Euthanasia
Involved the deliberated ending of one's life through an intervention or action, which may be based on a clear statement of the person's wishes or a decision made by someone else with the legal authority to do so.
Anniversary Reaction
Feelings of sadness and loneliness on holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, etc
Bereavement
The state/condition caused by loss through death
Bioethics
The study of the interaction between human values and tech. advances in the sciences.
Clinical Death
Definition of death baed on lack of heartbeat and respiration
End-of-life issues
Management issues of the final phase of life (disposition of body, memorial services, distribution of assets)
Euthanasia
Meaning "good death" the practice of allowing people who have terminal illnesses to die
Final Scenario
One's choices about end-of-life issues, which can be made known to others.
Grief
The feelings that arise after one suffers a loss.
Hospice
An approach to assisting dying people that emphasizes pain management and death with dignity.
Mourning
The ways in which we express grief.
Passive Euthanasia
Allowing a person to die by withholding an available treatment
Persistent vegetative state
A state in which a person's brainstem is the only part of the brain that is functioning, a state from which the person does not recover.
Whole-Brain Death
most widely accepted criteria for death involving eight criteria
Age discrimination
Denying employment or promotion to someone on the basis of age- age discrimination is illegal in United States
Alienation
The feelings that results when workers feel that what they are doing is worthless and that their efforts are devalued, or when they do not see the connection between what they do and the final product.
Burnout
The feeling that results when the pace and the pressure of one's occupation becomes more than one can bear, depleting one's energy and motivation.
Comparable Worth
The notion that people should be paid equally for similar work regardless of gender.
Inter-role conflict
A clash between competing or incompatible sets of roles, most often seen in work versus family settings.
Occupational priorities
The reasons why one works, and how one views them.
Preretirement education program
A program aimed at education workers about the broad range of issues they will face in retirement, including health, adjustment and finances
Reality Shock
The realization that the real world does not work like a textbook
Vocational Identity
the degree to which one views ones occupation as a key element of identity.
Work-family conflict
the feeling of being pulled from multiple directions by incompatible demands from one's job and one's family.
Assortative Mating
A theory that states that people find partners based on their similarity to each other.
Cohabitation
Living with another person as part of a committed, intimate, sexual relationship
Exchange Theory
A theory of relationships based on the idea that each partner contributes something to the relationship that the other would be hard-pressed to provide.
Familism
Refers to the idea that the well-being of the family takes precedence over the concerns of the individual family members.
Filial Obligation
The feelings that, as an adult child, one must care for one's parents
Homogamy
the notion that similar interests and values are important in forming strong, lasting, interpersonal relationship
Married Singles
Married couples who have grown apart but continue to live together
Sandwich generation
Middle-aged adults caught between the competing demands of two generations: their parents and their children
Alzheimer's Disease:
An irreversible form of dementia characterized by progressive declines in cognitive and bodily functions, eventually resulting in death- it accounts for about 70% of all cases of dementia
Behavior therapy
a type of psychotherapy that focuses on and attempts to alter current behavior. Underlying causes of the problem may not be addressed.
Beta-Amyloid
A type of protein involved in the formation of neuritic plaques both in normal aging and in Alzheimer's disease.
Cognitive Therapy
A type of psychotherapy aimed at altering the way people think as a cure for some forms of psychopathology- especially depression.
Delirium
A disorder characterized by a disturbance of consciousness and a change in cognition that develop over a short period of time
Dementia
A family of diseases characterized by cognitive decline- most common form is Alzheimer's disease
Dysphoria
feeling down/blue, marked by extreme sadness; major symptom of depression
Mental Status Exam
A short screening test that assesses mental competence, usually used as a brief indicator of dementia or other serious cognitive impairment
Vascular dementia
a form of dementia caused by a series of small strokes.
androgyny
gender role reflecting the acceptance of the most adaptive aspects of both the traditional masculine and female roles
Five Factor Model
a model of dispositional traits with the dimension of neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness-antagonism, and conscientiousness-undirectedness
Life Narrative
The aspects of personality that pull everything together, those integrative aspects that give a person and identity or sense of self.
Midlife Correction
Reevaluating one's roles and dreams and making the necessary corrections
Personal Concerns
Things that are important to people, their goals, and their major concerns in life
Possible Selves
Aspects of the self-concept involving oneself in the future in both positive and negative ways.
Age-based double standard
When an individual attributes an older person's failure in memory as more serious than a memory failure observed in a young adult
Assimilative Activities
Exercises that prevent losses in domains that are personally relevant for self-esteem/identity
Collaborative Cognition
Cognitive Performance that results from the interaction of two or more individuals
Correspondence Bias
Relying more on dispositional information in explaining behavior and ignoring compelling situational information such as extenuating circumstances.
Dispositional Attribution
An explanation for someone's behavior that resides within the actor
Implicit stereotyping
stereotyped beliefs that affect your judgements without you being aware of it
Negativity Bias
Weighing negative information more heavily than positive information in a social judgement
Impression Formation
the way in which people combine the components of another person's personality and come up with an integrated perception of the person.
Patronizing talk
using superficial conversation, slowed speech, simple vocabulary, carefully articulated words and a demeaning tone
Positivity Effect
the tendency to attend to an process positive information over negative
Primary control
the act of bringing the environment into line with one's own desires and goals
Secondary control
the act of bringing oneself in line with the environment
Situational Attribution
An explanation for someone's behavior that is external to the actor
Stereotyped Threat
An evoked fear of being judged in accordance with a negative stereotype about a group to which one individual belongs.
Accommodation
Changing one's though to better approximate the world of experience
Assimilation
using currently available knowledge to make sense out of incoming information
Crystallized Intelligence
Knowledge acquired through life experience and education in a particular culture
Factor
The interrelations among performances on similar tests of psychometric intelligence
Fluid Intelligence
Abilities that make one a flexible and adaptive thinker, that allow one to draw inferences, and that allow one to understand the relations among concepts independent of acquired knowledge and experience.
Multidimensional
The notion that intelligence consists of many dimensions
Multi directionality
the distinct patterns of change in abilities over the life span, with these patterns being different for different abilities.
Primary Mental Abilities
Independent abilities within psychometric intelligence based on different combinations of standardized intelligence tests.
Psychometric Approach
An approach to intelligence involving defining it as performance on standardized tests.
Reflective Judgment
Thinking that involves how people reason through dilemmas involving current affairs, religion science, etc.
Secondary Mental Abilities
Broad-ranging skills composed of several primary mental abilities