• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/14

Click to flip

14 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
MItotate- MOA, PK/Mon
- Inhibition of cortisol synthesis and release, alters peripheral metabolism of cortisol
- this is cytotoxic drug
PK/Mon- slow inset, moniter free urin corticol to guide therapy
Mitotate- Use, AE
Use: adrenal adenoma, or other cases when medical adrenalectomy is needed. must be given w/ exogenous steroids
AE: drowsiness, anorexia, GI muscle weakness
Aminoglutethamide- MOA, AE
What drug is often given together?
MOA: inhibits cholesterol desmolase to decreases prenolone and all the adrenal cortex hormones downstream, inclusing estrogen
AE: drowsiness, bone marrow suppression, drug induced lupus
- Metyrapone
Metyrapone- MOA, AE
MOA: inhibits 11 BETA hydroxylase to decreases cortisol and sometimes also aldosterone
AE: hypokalemia, rash, hirsuitism
Ketoconazole- MOA, AE
MOA: antifungal that inhibits 11 beta, 17 alpha, and cholesterol desmolase, and testosterone at higher doses
AE: drug interactions, GI, increases LFTs, impotence, gynecomastia
Mifepriston- MOA, Use
MOA: glucocorticoid and progesterone antagonist
Use: chiefly as an abortifactent, Cushings, progesterone positive cancers
Fludrocortisone acetate- MOA, Use
MOA: minercorticoid agonist
Use: adrenal insufficiency, dose based on serum K+ (when high K+means dose must be increased) and on BP (if low BP means hsould increase the dose)
Cortisone, hydrocortisone- Class, MOA
Class: short acting corticosteroids-- 8 hrs
MOA: primarily cortisol agonist but also some mineralcorticoid agonism, low antiinflammatory potency but acts like mineralocorticoid
Prednisone, methylprenisone, triacinolone- Class, MOA
CLass: intermediate acting - 12 hrs
MOA: primarily cortisol agonist (also some mineralocorticoid agonism), pretty anti inflammatory
Dexamethason, betamethasone- Class, MOA
Class: long acting cortisol agonist
MOA:very potent anti-inflammatory, never acts like a mineralocorticoid
Corticosteroids- Use, AE withdrawal
Use: replacement therapy, asthma/allergies, rheumatic disease, IBD (Crohn’s & UC), COPD, organ transplantation, etc, etc, etc
AE withdrawal: 1) Disease flare-up if indicated for auto-immune disease OR (2) Acute adrenal insufficiency: N/V, hypoglycemia, dizziness, dyspnea, arthralgia
Corticosteroids- AE due to suprphysiologic xs
- HTN, low K+, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, infection, peptic ulcer disease, cataracts, myopathy, teratogenicity and all other effects seen in Cushings
o Consider alternative day therapy to minimize above
How long does a pt have to be on corticosteroid tx to require tapering of tx?
2 wks
Besides tapering what is another method to prevent cushings like AE?
- alternating day therapy