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52 Cards in this Set

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sitophobia (sy-tuh-FO-bee-uh) noun
Morbid aversion to food.

[From Greek sito- (food) + -phobia (fear, aversion).]
From Greek
polyphagia (pol-ee-FAY-jee-uh) noun
1. Excessive appetite or eating.

2. The habit of feeding on many kinds of food.

[From Modern Latin, from Greek polyphagia, from polyphagos, from poly- (much, many) + phagy (eating).]
From Greek
bibacious (by-BAY-shuhs) adjective
Overly fond of drinking.

[From Latin bibere (to drink).]
From Latin
postprandial (post-PRAN-dee-uhl) adjective
After a meal, especially dinner.

[From Latin post- (after) + prandium (meal).]
From Latin
gamboge (gam-BOJ, -BOOZH) noun

toponym
1. A reddish yellow color.

2. A gum resin obtained from the sap of trees of the genus Garcinia, used as a yellow pigment and as a cathartic.

[From New Latin gambogium, variant of cambugium, after Cambodia where, among other places in southeast Asia, this tree is found.]
toponym
vernissage (ver-nuh-SAZH) noun

toponym
A private showing or preview of an art exhibition before the public opening; also the reception celebrating the opening of an art exhibition.

[From French vernissage (varnishing), from vernis (varnish), ultimately from Berenik, the name of an ancient city in Cyrenaica in northern Africa where natural resins were first used as varnish.]
toponym
Finlandization (fin-luhn-duh-ZAY-shuhn) noun

toponym
The policy of neutrality of a country under the influence of another more powerful one without being formally allied to it, similar to the neutralization of Finland with respect to the Soviet Union after 1944.

[After Finland.]
toponym
Fleet Street (fleet street) noun

toponym
The British press.

[After Fleet Street in London, where many British newspapers used to be published.]
toponym
hackney (HAK-nee) adjective

toponym
1. Trite.

2. Let out for hire.

[Probably after Hackney in East London, where such horses were raised. The word hack, in related senses, is a short form of hackney.]
toponym
hackney (HAK-nee) verb tr.

toponym
1. To make banal or common by frequent use.

2. To hire out.

[Probably after Hackney in East London, where such horses were raised. The word hack, in related senses, is a short form of hackney.]
toponym
hackney (HAK-nee) noun

toponym
1. A breed of horses developed in England, having a high-stepping gait.

2. A horse suitable for routine riding or driving.

3. A carriage or coach for hire.

[Probably after Hackney in East London, where such horses were raised. The word hack, in related senses, is a short form of hackney.]
toponym
undecennary (uhn-di-SEHN-uh-ree) noun
1. A period of eleven years.

2. An eleventh anniversary.

[From Latin undecim (eleven), from unus (one) + decem (ten), + -ennary, from annus (year).]
From Latin
undecennary (uhn-di-SEHN-uh-ree) adjective
1. Of or pertaining to a period of eleven years.

2. Occurring every eleven years.

[From Latin undecim (eleven), from unus (one) + decem (ten), + -ennary, from annus (year).]
From Latin
elevenses (i-LEV-uhn-ziz) noun
A midmorning break for refreshments taken between breakfast and lunch, usually around 11am.

[Double plural of eleven, perhaps as ellipsis of eleven hours (eleven o'clock).]
hendecagon (hen-DEK-uh-gon) noun
An eleven-sided polygon.

[From Greek hendeca- (eleven), from hen, neuter of heis (one) + deka (ten) + -gon (angled), from gonia (angle).]
From Greek
eleventh hour (i-LEV-uhnth our) noun
The last moment.

[From the parable in the Bible where laborers hired at the eleventh hour of the twelve-hour workday were paid the same as those hired earlier.]
A parable in the Bible
hendecasyllabic (hen-dek-uh-si-LAB-ik) adjective
Having eleven syllables.

[From Latin hendecasyllabus, from Greek hendekasyllabos, from hendeca- (eleven), from hen, neuter of heis (one) + deka (ten), + syllabic.]
From Greek
hendecasyllabic (hen-dek-uh-si-LAB-ik) noun
A word or line of eleven syllables.

[From Latin hendecasyllabus, from Greek hendekasyllabos, from hendeca- (eleven), from hen, neuter of heis (one) + deka (ten), + syllabic.]
From Greek
fractious (FRAK-shuhs) adjective
1. Irritable; cranky.

2. Unruly.

[From Middle English fraccioun, from Late Latin fraction-, stem of fractio (act of breaking), from Latin fractus, past participle of Latin frangere (to break).]
From Latin
subdolous (SUB-duh-luhs) adjective
Sly; crafty; cunning.

[From Latin subdolus, from sub- (slightly) + dolus (deceit).]
From Latin
incogitant (in-KOJ-i-tuhnt) adjective
Thoughtless; inconsiderate.

[From Latin incogitant-, from cogitare (to think), from agitare (to agitate), from agere (to drive).]
From Latin
execrable (EK-si-kruh-buhl) adjective
Detestable; wretched.

[From Middle English, from Latin execrabilis (accursed), from execrari (to curse), from ex- + sacrare (to consecrate).]
From Latin
refractory (ri-FRAK-tuhr-ree) adjective
1. Hard to manage; stubborn.

2. Resistant to usual methods or treatment.

3. Difficult to fuse: resistant to high temperature.

[From alteration of refractary, from Latin refractarius (stubborn), from refractus, past participle of refringere (to break up), from re- + frangere (to break).]
From Latin
refractory (ri-FRAK-tuhr-ree) noun
A heat-resistant material.

[From alteration of refractary, from Latin refractarius (stubborn), from refractus, past participle of refringere (to break up), from re- + frangere (to break).]
From Latin
antanaclasis (ant-an-uh-KLAS-is) noun
A play on words in which a key word is repeated in a different, often contrary, sense.

[From Greek antanaklasis (echo or reflection), from anti- (against) + ana- + klasis (breaking or bending).]
From Greek
paralipsis (par-uh-LIP-sis) noun, plural paralipses (-seez)
Drawing attention to something while claiming to be passing over it.

[From Late Latin paralipsis, from Greek paraleipsis (an omission), from paraleipein (to leave on one side), from para- (side) + leipein (to leave).]
From Greek
antiphrasis (an-TIF-ruh-sis) noun
The humorous or ironic use of a word or a phrase in a sense opposite of its usual meaning.

[From Late Latin, from Greek antiphrazein (to express by the opposite), from anti- + phrazein (to speak).]
From Greek
oxymoron (ok-see-MOR-on, -mor-) noun, plural oxymora or oxymorons
A figure of speech in which two contradictory terms appear together for emphasis, for example, "deafening silence".

[From Greek oxymoron, from neuter of oxymoros (sharp dull), from oxys (sharp) + moros (dull). The word moron comes from the same root.]
From Greek
esprit d'escalier (e-SPREE des-kal-i-YE) noun, also esprit de l'escalier
1. Thinking of a witty remark too late; hindsight wit or afterwit.

2. Such a remark.

[From French esprit de l'escalier, from esprit (wit) + escalier (stairs).]
From French
halcyon (HAL-see-uhn) adjective
1. Peaceful; tranquil.

2. Carefree; joyful.

3. Golden; prosperous.

[From Greek halkyon (kingfisher). A mythical bird, identified with the kingfisher. It nested at sea and had the power to charm the wind and waves so that they became calm.]
From Greek
halcyon (HAL-see-uhn) noun
Any of various kingfishers of the genus Halcyon.

[From Greek halkyon (kingfisher) via Latin and Middle English. Halcyon was a mythical bird, identified with the kingfisher, that was said to breed around the winter solstice. It nested at sea and had the power to charm the wind and waves so that they became calm.]
From Greek
Cerberus (SUR-buh-ruhs) noun
A powerful, hostile guard.

[From Latin, from Greek Kerberos.]
From Greek
cyclopean (sy-kluh-PEE-uhn, si-KLOP-ee-uhn) adjective
1. Of or suggestive of Cyclops; one-eyed.

2. Huge.

3. Formed with large, irregular stones closely fitted without the use of mortar.

[From Latin Cyclopeus, from Greek Kyklops (Cyclops), from kyklos (circle) + ops (eye). Savage one-eyed giants in Greek mythology. Forged thunderbolts for Zeus.]
From Greek
Minotaur (MIN-uh-tawr) noun
Someone or something monstrous, especially one that devours.

[From Latin Minotaurus, from Greek Minotauros, from Minos (a king of Crete) + tauros (bull).]
From Greek
dragon's teeth (DRAG-uhns teeth) noun
Seeds of discord. Usually used in the form "to sow dragon's teeth": to take an action that leads to future conflict.

[In Greek mythology, the Phoenician prince Cadmus killed a dragon and sowed its teeth. From those teeth sprang an army of men who fought each other until only five were left.]
pontificate (pon-TIF-i-kayt) verb intr.
To speak in a pompous and dogmatic manner.

[From Medieval Latin pontificatus, past participle of pontificare (to be an ecclesiastic), from ponti-, from pons (bridge) + facere (to make).]
From Latin
colporteur (KAWL-por-tuhr) noun
A peddler of religious books.

[From French colporteur (peddler), from col (neck) + porter (to carry), from Latin portare, from the idea of a peddler carrying his wares in a bag hung around his neck.]
From Latin
catholicity (kath-uh-LIS-i-tee) noun
1. Wide-ranging; universality.

2. Broad-mindedness; inclusiveness.

[From Latin catholicus, from Greek katholikos (general),
from kata (according to, by) + holou (whole).]
From Latin
hagiarchy (HAG-ee-ar-kee, HAY-jee-) noun
A government by holy persons. Also a place thus governed.

[From Greek hagi- (holy) + -archy (rule).]
From Greek
latitudinarian (lat-i-TOOD-n-ar-ee-uhn, -TYOOD-) adjective
Holding broad and tolerant views, especially on matters of religion.

[From Latin latitudin-, stem of latitudo (breadth), from latus (broad).]
From Latin
latitudinarian (lat-i-TOOD-n-ar-ee-uhn, -TYOOD-) noun
One who is broadminded and tolerant, especially concerning religion.

[From Latin latitudin-, stem of latitudo (breadth), from latus (broad).]
From Latin
festschrift (FEST-shrift) noun, plural festschriften or festschrifts
A volume of writing by many authors as a tribute to a scholar, for example, on the occasion of retirement of a colleague.

[From German Festschrift, from Fest (celebration) + Schrift (writing).]
From German
feuilleton (FOI-i-ton) noun
1. The part of a European newspaper devoted to light literature, criticism, and the like; also something printed in this section.

2. A novel published in installments.

3. A short literary piece

[From French, from feuillet (sheet of paper), diminutive of feuille (leaf), from Old French foille, from Latin folium (leaf).]
From Latin
roman a clef (ro-mahn ah KLAY) noun, plural romans a clef
A novel that depicts (usually famous) real people and events under the guise of fiction.

[From French roman à clef, literally, a novel with a key.]
From French
variorum (var-ee-OR-um) adjective
1. Containing various versions (from manuscripts, earlier editions, etc.) of a text.

2. Containing notes and commentaries by various editors and commentators.

[From Latin editio cum notis variorum (edition with notes of various) [authors/sources].]
From Latin
variorum (var-ee-OR-um) noun
1. A book containing various versions (from manuscripts, earlier editions, etc.) of a text.

2. A book containing notes and commentaries by various editors and commentators.

[From Latin editio cum notis variorum (edition with notes of various)
[authors/sources].]
From Latin
chrestomathy (kres-TOM-uh-thee) noun
1. A volume of selected literary passages, usually by one author.

2. A selection of literary passages from a foreign language, especially one assembled for studying a language.

[From Greek chrestomatheia, from chrestos (useful) + manthanein (to learn).]
From Greek
temporize also temporise (TEM-puh-ryz) verb intr.
To delay so as to gain time or to avoid making a decision.

[From French temporiser (to bide one's time), from Medieval Latin temporizare (to pass the time), from Latin tempor-, from tempus (time).]
From Latin
adduce (uh-DOOS, uh-DYOOS) verb tr.
To offer as evidence; to offer something as proof.

[From Latin adducere (to bring forward), from ad- (towards) + ducere (to lead).]
From Latin
perpend (pur-PEND) verb tr. and intr.
To reflect upon; to consider; to ponder.

[From Latin perpendere (to weigh thoroughly), from per- (thoroughly) + pendere (to weigh).]
From Latin
animadvert (an-uh-mad-VURT) verb intr.
To comment critically (upon) or to express criticism.

[From Latin animadvertere (to turn the mind to), from animus (mind) + advertere (to turn).]
From Latin
palter (PAWL-tuhr) verb intr.
1. To talk or act in an insincere or deceitful manner.

2. To haggle.

[Origin unknown.]