Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/22

Click to flip

22 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
CSTN
Short for color super-twist nematic, an LCD technology developed by Sharp Electronics Corporation. Unlike TFT, CSTN is based on a passive matrix, which is less expensive to produce. The original CSTN displays developed in the early 90's suffered from slow response times and ghosting. Recent advances in the technology, however, have made CSTN a viable alternative to active-matrix displays. New CSTN displays offer 100ms response times, a 140 degree viewing angle, and high-quality color rivaling TFT displays - all at about half the cost.
DSTN
Short for double-layer supertwist nematic, a passive-matrix LCD technology that uses two display layers to counteract the color shifting that occurs with conventional supertwist displays.
supertwist
A technique for improving LCD display screens by twisting light rays. In addition to normal supertwist displays, there also exist double supertwist and triple supertwist displays. In general, the more twists, the higher the contrast.
DIMM
Short for dual in-line memory module, a small circuit board that holds memory chips. A single in-line memory module (SIMM) has a 32-bit path to the memory chips whereas a DIMM has 64-bit path. Because the Pentium processor requires a 64-bit path to memory, you need to install SIMMs two at a time. With DIMMs, you can install memory one DIMM at a time.
SIMM
Acronym for single in-line memory module, a small circuit board that can hold a group of memory chips. Typically, SIMMs hold up to eight (on Macintoshes) or nine (on PCs) RAM chips. On PCs, the ninth chip is often used for parity error checking. Unlike memory chips, SIMMs are measured in bytes rather than bits. SIMMs are easier to install than individual memory chips.
bus
A collection of wires through which data is transmitted from one part of a computer to another. You can think of a bus as a highway on which data travels within a computer. When used in reference to personal computers, the term bus usually refers to internal bus. This is a bus that connects all the internal computer components to the CPU and main memory. There's also an expansion bus that enables expansion boards to access the CPU and memory.
address bus
A collection of wires connecting the CPU with main memory that is used to identify particular locations (addresses) in main memory. The width of the address bus (that is, the number of wires) determines how many unique memory locations can be addressed. Modern PCs and Macintoshes have as many as 36 address lines, which enables them theoretically to access 64 GB (gigabytes) of main memory. However, the actually amount of memory that can be accessed is usually much less than this theoretical limit due to chipset and motherboard limitations.
DIP
Acronym for dual in-line package, a type of chip housed in a rectangular casing with two rows of connecting pins on either side.
ESD
Short for electrostatic discharge, the rapid discharge of static electricity from one conductor to another of a different potential. An electrostatic discharge can damage integrated circuits found in computer and communications equipment.
fdisk
A DOS and Windows utility that prepares a hard disk for formatting by creating one primary partition on the disk.
file allocation table
A table that the operating system uses to locate files on a disk. Due to fragmentation, a file may be divided into many sections that are scattered around the disk. The FAT keeps track of all these pieces.
flash BIOS
Many modern PCs have a flash BIOS, which means that the BIOS has been recorded on a flash memory chip, which can be updated if necessary.
LBA
(pronounced as separate letters) Short for logical block addressing, a method used with SCSI and IDE disk drives to translate the cylinder, head, and sector specifications of the drive into addresses that can be used by an enhanced BIOS. LBA is used with drive's that are larger than 504 MB.
logical
Refers to a user's view of the way data or systems are organized. The opposite of logical is physical, which refers to the real organization of a system. For example, a logical description of a file is that it is a collection of data stored together. This is the way files appear to users. Physically, however, a single file can be divided into many pieces scattered across a disk.
MBR
Short for Master Boot Record, a small program that is executed when a computer boots up. Typically, the MBR resides on the first sector of the hard disk. The program begins the boot process by looking up the partition table to determine which partition to use for booting. It then transfers program control to the boot sector of that partition, which continues the boot process. In DOS and Windows systems, you can create the MBR with the FDISK /MBR command.
MFT
Short for Master File Table, a file that contains information in the form of 1024-byte records about every other file and directory in an NTFS volume (i.e., it is essentially a table of metadata). The data stored in the MFT is what the operating system needs to retrieve the files. For example, it contains file permissions, the name and size of the file, the date and time it was created and the date and time it was modified.
MSCDEX
Short for Microsoft CD-ROM Extension, a driver that enables DOS and Windows 3.x systems to recognize and control CD-ROM players. The driver is located in a file called MSCDEX.EXE. Windows 95 replaces MSCDEX with a 32-bit, dynamically loadable driver called CDFS.
PLCC
Short for Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier, a square surface-mount chip package for low thermal output microprocessors that substitutes epoxy plastic for the ceramic materials that are commonly used to encase chips in systems designed for microprocessors that produce high thermal outputs that can melt the plastic epoxy. Unlike pin grid arrays , the die in a PLCC is attached to the package by a gold-plated contact pad.
PS/2 port
A type of port developed by IBM for connecting a mouse or keyboard to a PC. The PS/2 port supports a mini DIN plug containing just 6 pins. Most PCs have a PS/2 port so that the serial port can be used by another device, such as a modem. The PS/2 port is often called the mouse port.
SSL
(pronounced as separate letters) Short for Secure Sockets Layer, a protocol developed by Netscape for transmitting private documents via the Internet. SSL works by using a private key to encrypt data that's transferred over the SSL connection. Both Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer support SSL, and many Web sites use the protocol to obtain confidential user information, such as credit card numbers. By convention, URLs that require an SSL connection start with https: instead of http:.
VRM
Short for voltage regulator module, a small module that installs on a motherboard to regulate the voltage fed to the microprocessor. Nearly all motherboards have either a built-in voltage regulator or a VRM, the only difference being that the VRM is replaceable.
ZIF socket
Short for zero insertion force socket, a chip socket that allows one to insert and remove a chip without special tools.