Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/46

Click to flip

46 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Access Board
Access Board - An independent Federal agency that develops accessibility guidelines under the ADA and other laws. The Access Board is also known as the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board.
Accessible
Accessible - Describes a site, building, facility, or portion thereof that complies with the play area guidelines.
Accessible Route
Accessible Route - A continuous unobstructed path connecting all accessible elements and spaces of a building or facility. Inside the boundary of the play area, accessible routes may include platforms, ramps, elevators, and lifts. Outside the boundary of the play area, accessible routes may also include parking access aisles, curb ramps, crosswalks at vehicular ways, walks, ramps, and lifts.
ADA
ADA - Americans with Disabilities Act.
ADAAG
ADAAG - Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines.
Alteration
Alteration - An alteration is a change to a building or facility that affects or could affect the usability of the building of facility or part thereof. Alterations include, but are not limited to, remodeling, renovation, rehabilitation, reconstruction, historic restoration, resurfacing of circulation paths or vehicular ways, changes or rearrangement of structural parts or elements, and changes or rearrangement in the plan configuration of walls and full-height partitions. Normal maintenance is not an alteration unless it affects the usability of the facility (see section on alterations for more details).
Amusement Attraction
Amusement Attraction - Any facility, or portion of a facility, located within an amusement park or theme park, that provides amusement without the use of an amusement device. Examples include, but are not limited to, fun houses, barrels, and other attractions without seats.
ASTM
ASTM - American Society for Testing and Materials.
Berm
Berm - A sloped surface at ground level designed to ascend or descend in elevation.
Clear
Clear - Unobstructed.
Clear Floor Space
Clear Floor Space - The minimum unobstructed floor or ground space required to accommodate a single, stationary wheelchair and occupant.
Composite Play Structure
Composite Play Structure - Two or more play structures attached or functionally linked, to create one integral unit that provides more than one play activity (ASTM F 1487-98).
Cross Slope
Cross Slope - The slope that is perpendicular to the direction of travel (see running slope).
Elevated Play Component
Elevated Play Component - A play component that is approached above or below grade and that is part of a composite play structure consisting of two or more play components attached or functionally linked to create an integrated unit providing more than one play activity.
Facility
Facility - All or any portion of buildings, structures, site improvements, complexes, equipment, roads, walks, passageways, parking lots, or other real or personal property located on a site.
Ground Level Play Component
Ground Level Play Component - A play component that is approached and exited at the ground level.
Play Area
Play Area - A portion of a site containing play components designed and constructed for children.
Play Component
Play Component - An element intended to generate specific opportunities for play, socialization, or learning. Play components may be manufactured or natural, and may be stand alone or part of a composite play structure.
Ramp
Ramp - A walking surface that has a running slope of greater that 1:20.
Running Slope
Running Slope - The slope that is parallel to the direction of travel (see cross slope).
Site
Site - A parcel of land bounded by a property line or a designated portion of a public right-of-way.
Soft Contained Play Structure
Soft Contained Play Structure - A play structure made up of one or more components where the user enters a fully enclosed play environment that utilizes pliable materials (e.g., plastic, netting, fabric).
Use Zone
Use Zone - The ground level area beneath and immediately adjacent to a play structure or piece of equipment that is designated by ASTM F 1487 Standard Consumer Safety Performance Specification for Playground Equipment for Public Use for unrestricted circulation. This is the play surface upon which it is predicted a user would land when falling from or exiting the equipment.
Alterations: Play Areas Separated by Age
WHERE DO THE PLAY AREA GUIDELINES APPLY? New Construction
The play area guidelines in this guide apply to all newly designed or constructed play areas for children ages 2 and older. This includes play areas located in a variety of settings: parks, schools, childcare facilities, shopping centers, and public gathering areas. Owners or operators of newly constructed play areas are responsible for complying with these guidelines.

The play area guidelines do not apply to:

Family childcare facilities where the proprietor resides
Amusement attractions
Religious entities
Play Areas Separated by Age
To reduce the risk of injury, safety guidelines recommend separate play areas for different age groups. In applying the guidelines, play areas designed for different age groups should be considered separately. A play area designed for 2- to 5-year-olds is considered separate from one for 5- to 12-year-olds. Therefore, compliance with the guidelines must be considered for each individual play area.
Alterations: Geographically Separated Play Areas

WHERE DO THE PLAY AREA GUIDELINES APPLY? New Construction
The play area guidelines in this guide apply to all newly designed or constructed play areas for children ages 2 and older. This includes play areas located in a variety of settings: parks, schools, childcare facilities, shopping centers, and public gathering areas. Owners or operators of newly constructed play areas are responsible for complying with these guidelines.

The play area guidelines do not apply to:

Family childcare facilities where the proprietor resides
Amusement attractions
Religious entities
Geographically Separated Play Areas
Large geographical spaces may contain several play areas within one park setting. Where play areas are geographically separated on a site, they are considered separate play areas. The accessibility guidelines apply to each play area.
Alterations: Phasing in Play Areas

New Construction
The play area guidelines in this guide apply to all newly designed or constructed play areas for children ages 2 and older. This includes play areas located in a variety of settings: parks, schools, childcare facilities, shopping centers, and public gathering areas. Owners or operators of newly constructed play areas are responsible for complying with these guidelines.

The play area guidelines do not apply to:

Family childcare facilities where the proprietor resides
Amusement attractions
Religious entities
Phasing in Play Areas
When play areas are constructed in phases, they must continue to meet the play area guidelines throughout construction. The initial phase area must meet the guidelines, and then at each successive phase the whole play area must be reassessed to assure compliance. "Phased Designs" are play areas developed to be installed in different stages, allowing the play area to grow in a planned manner while accommodating budgets, fund raising, or community approval processes. The play area shown below will be installed in twp phases. As each phase is completed, the entire play area must be reevaluated for compliance
Alteration: Equivalent Facilitation
Section 2.2 of ADAAG states

New Construction
The play area guidelines in this guide apply to all newly designed or constructed play areas for children ages 2 and older. This includes play areas located in a variety of settings: parks, schools, childcare facilities, shopping centers, and public gathering areas. Owners or operators of newly constructed play areas are responsible for complying with these guidelines.

The play area guidelines do not apply to:

Family childcare facilities where the proprietor resides
Amusement attractions
Religious entities
Equivalent Facilitation
Section 2.2 of ADAAG states:
"Departures from particular technical and scoping requirements of this guideline by the use of other designs and technologies are permitted where the alternative designs and technologies used will provide substantially equivalent or greater access to and usability of the facility."

Equivalent facilitation is the concept of utilizing innovative solutions and new technology, design, or materials in order to satisfy the guidelines. These alternative solutions provide equal access and take advantage of new developments, but may differ technically from specific guidelines.
New Construction

Alterations

The play area guidelines in this guide apply to all newly designed or constructed play areas for children ages 2 and older. This includes play areas located in a variety of settings: parks, schools, childcare facilities, shopping centers, and public gathering areas. Owners or operators of newly constructed play areas are responsible for complying with these guidelines.

The play area guidelines do not apply to:

Family childcare facilities where the proprietor resides
Amusement attractions
Religious entities
Alterations
Alterations
The play area guidelines apply to alterations made to existing play areas that affect, or could affect, the usability of the play area. Examples include removing a climbing play component and replacing it with a spring rocker, or changing the ground surfacing.

Alterations provide an opportunity to improve access to existing play areas. Where play components are altered and the ground surface is not, the ground surface does not have to comply with the ASTM F 1951-99 standard for accessible surfaces unless the cost of providing an accessible surface is less than 20 percent of the cost of the alterations to the play components.

If the entire ground surface of an existing play area is replaced, the new ground surface must provide an accessible route to connect the required number and types of play components. Normal maintenance activities such as replacing worn ropes or topping off ground surfaces are not considered alterations.

If play components are relocated in an existing play area to create safe use zones, the guidelines do not apply, provided that the ground surface is not changed or extended for more than one use zone. Replacing the entire ground surface does not require the addition of more play components.

This play area was altered by adding two spring rockers (background). The seat of at least one spring rocker is between 11 inches (280 mm) and 24 inches (610 mm) maximum, and clear floor or ground space and maneuvering space is provided. If the ground surface is replaced in the future, an accessible route would have to be provided to the spring rocker.
Play Components
Play Components
A play component is an element designed to generate specific opportunities for play, socialization, and learning. Play components may be manufactured or natural, and may be stand alone or part of a composite play structure. Swings, spring riders (below), water tables, playhouses, slides, and climbers (right) are among the many different play components.

For the purpose of the guidelines, ramps, transfer systems, steps, decks, and roofs are not considered play components. These elements are generally used to link other elements on a composite play structure. Although socialization and pretend play can occur on these elements, they are not primarily intended for play.

When applying the play area guidelines, it is important to identify the different play experiences play components can provide.
Different Types of Play Components
Different "Types"
At least one of each type of play component provided at ground level in a play area must be on the accessible route. Different "types" of play components are based on the general experience provided by the play component. Different types include, but are not limited to, experiences such as rocking, swinging, climbing, spinning, and sliding.

"Rocking" is an example of horizontal movement that can be backwards, forwards, sideways or even circular in nature. "Sliding" is an example of rapid descent that utilizes the force of gravity.
Play Experience
While a spiral slide (right) provides a slightly different experience from a straight slide (left), the primary experience - a sense of rapid descent or sliding - is common to both activities. Therefore, a spiral slide and a straight slide are considered one "type" of play experience.
Elevated Play Components
Elevated Play Components

An elevated play component is a play component that is approached above or below grade and is part of a composite play structure. Play components that are attached to a composite play structure and that can be approached from a platform or deck area are considered elevated play components.


This climber is considered an elevated component since it can be approached or exited from the ground level or above grade from a platform or deck on a composite play structure.
Ground Level Play Components
Ground-Level Play Components

Ground-level play components are items that can be approached and exited at ground level. For example, a child approaches a spring rider at ground level via the accessible route. The child may ride then exit directly back onto the accessible route. The activity is considered ground level because the child approaches and exits it from the ground-level route.

"Ground-level components" are approached and exited at ground level.
Ground-level play components may include items such as swings, spring riders, and panels. Freestanding slides are considered ground-level components for the purpose of these guidelines. An accessible route must connect to the ladder or steps, and to the exit of the slide. While this solution does not provide access for all children, it gives many individuals the opportunity to access play components.
More than one ground level component
When more than one ground-level play component is required on an accessible route, the play components must be integrated. Designers should consider the optimal layout of ground-level play components to foster interaction and socialization among all children. Grouping all ground-level play components accessed by children with disabilities in one location does not constitute integration.
There are two requirements addressing how many ground-level play components must be on an accessible route:
One of Each Type
Ground-Level Requirements based on the number of Elevated Play Components

One of Each Type
At least one of each type of ground-level play component that is present in the play area must be on an accessible route.
Ground Level Requirements Based on Elevated Play Components
Ground Level Requirements Based on Elevated Play Components
The number and variety of ground-level play components required to be on an accessible route is also determined by the number of elevated components provided in the play area.

The intent of this requirement is to provide a variety of experiences for individuals who choose to remain with their mobility devices, or choose not to transfer to elevated play components.
This table lists the number of elevated play components provided and the corresponding minimum number of ground-level play components required to be on accessible route; and the minimum number of different types of ground-level play components required to be on accessible route:
This table lists the number of elevated play components provided and the corresponding minimum number of ground-level play components required to be on accessible route; and the minimum number of different types of ground-level play components required to be on accessible route:

Elevated components provided: 1
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: not applicable/ not applicable

Elevated components provided: 2 - 4
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 1/ 1

Elevated components provided: 5 - 7
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 2/ 2

Elevated components provided: 8 - 10
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 3/ 3

Elevated components provided: 11 - 13
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 4/ 3

Elevated components provided: 14 - 16
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 5/ 3

Elevated components provided: 17 - 19
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 6/ 3

Elevated components provided: 20 - 22
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 7/ 4

Elevated components provided: 23 - 25
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 8/ 4

Elevated components provided: more than 25
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 8 plus 1 for each additional 3 over 25, or fraction thereof/ 5
If ramps provide access to at least 50 percent of the elevated play components - which must include at least three different play types - then additional ground-level components are not required.
If ramps provide access to at least 50 percent of the elevated play components - which must include at least three different play types - then additional ground-level components are not required.

An example: the composite structure of a play area has four elevated play components (bubble panel, slide, steering wheel, and tic-tac-toe panel). According to the table, a minimum of one ground level play component must be provided, and a minimum of one different type. The spring rider or swing can be used to meet the "one of each type" requirement and can also be used to meet the minimum number determined by Table 15.6.2.2.

The number of ground-level components determined by "one of each type" can also fulfill the minimum ground level requirement that is indicated by the elevated play components table.
Elevated Play Components
Elevated Play Components
At least 50 percent of the elevated play components must be on an accessible route. An "elevated play component" is a play component reached from above or below grade, and is part of a composite play structure.
Play areas with 20 or more elevated components
Play areas with 20 or more elevated components (right) must use ramps to connect a minimum of 25 percent of those components. A transfer system or ramps may connect the other elevated play components required on an accessible route.
Play areas with less than 20 elevated play components
Play areas with less than 20 elevated play components (left) may use a transfer system instead of ramps to connect at least 50 percent of the elevated components.
Step-by-Step Guide

The following step-by-step guide has been provided to assist in evaluating a play area for meeting the minimum requirements of these guidelines. The guide has been arranged in four steps and provides spaces to fill in numeric values of play components for evaluating a specific play area design.
STEP 1 Assess your play area design
This step identifies the number and different types of ground level play components provided in a play area design. The number of elevated play components is also identified.

STEP 2 Determine what is needed
In some cases, the accessibility guidelines will require additional play components to be provided to meet the minimum requirements. Step 2 begins identifying what is needed by reading Table 15.6.2.2. Table 15.6.2.2 establishes a minimum level of ground level play components required to be on an accessible route, based on the number of elevated play components provided.

STEP 3 Compare which is greater
Step 3 compares your results in identifying the number and different types of ground level play components with those required by Table 15.6.2.2. The greater number is considered to be the minimum number of ground level play components required to be on an accessible route.

STEP 4 Assess how to get there
Step 4 examines the number of elevated play components provided, beginning with the number established in step 1. Once the number of elevated play components provided is identified, step 4 defines the type of route to be provided to connect to these elevated play components. Where 20 or more elevated play components are provided, ramps must connect to a minimum of 25% of the elevated play components. Ramp or transfer systems must connect to the remaining 25%. If 19 or fewer elevated play components are provided, transfer systems must connect to a minimum of 50% of the elevated play components.
This table lists the number of elevated play components provided and the corresponding minimum number of ground-level play components required to be on accessible route; and the minimum number of different types of ground-level play components required to be on accessible route:
This table lists the number of elevated play components provided and the corresponding minimum number of ground-level play components required to be on accessible route; and the minimum number of different types of ground-level play components required to be on accessible route:

Elevated components provided: 1
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: not applicable/ not applicable

Elevated components provided: 2 - 4
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 1/ 1

Elevated components provided: 5 - 7
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 2/ 2

Elevated components provided: 8 - 10
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 3/ 3

Elevated components provided: 11 - 13
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 4/ 3

Elevated components provided: 14 - 16
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 5/ 3

Elevated components provided: 17 - 19
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 6/ 3

Elevated components provided: 20 - 22
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 7/ 4

Elevated components provided: 23 - 25
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 8/ 4

Elevated components provided: more than 25
Minimum number/ type of ground level components: 8 plus 1 for each additional 3 over 25, or fraction thereof/ 5
ADAAG Section 4.3
ADAAG Section 4.3 addresses accessible routes that connect the play area to the school, parking lot, or facility that it serves. Operators or owners of play areas are subject to all the other requirements of the ADA, including the obligation to provide individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to enjoy the play area provided by that facility.

This section describes the various features of accessible routes within a play area, including location, clear width, slope, and accessible surfaces.
There are two types of accessible routes:
There are two types of accessible routes:

Ground-level
Elevated

The accessible route must connect all entry and exit points of accessible play components. Clear floor space required at play components and maneuvering space can overlap the accessible route. Incorporating additional circulation space around high-use play components creates extra room for movement
and accessibility for everyone using the play area.
last page I typed from site
Ground-Level Accessible Routes
A ground-level accessible route connects play components at ground level.

60 inches (1525 mm) minimum clear width
1:16 maximum slope
The route may narrow down to 36 inches (915 mm) for a distance of 60 inches (1525 mm). This permits flexibility to work around site design features like existing equipment or trees (left). The required 60-inch width enables two wheelchairs to pass each other or to change direction (right).






Smaller play areas - those that are less than 1,000 square feet (304.8 square meters) - may have ground-level accessible routes that are 44 inches (1120 mm) clear width. A wheelchair turning space must be provided where the route exceeds 30 feet (9.14 mm) in length.

At ground level, objects may not protrude into the 60-inch wide space of an accessible route up to or below the height of 80 inches (2030 mm), measured above the accessible route surface. The 80-inch clearance applies only to the 60-inch accessible route, and is not required for the entire play area. The 80-inch vertical clearance applies to ground-level routes only, and not elevated routes. This allows features like protective roofs and sun shelters to be present.



This play area provides a fun, accessible roadway theme. The protective shelters for the benches have been set outside the boundary of the route, providing the 80 inches of clearance required on the route.


Maximum Slope at Ground Level
The maximum allowable slope for a ground-level accessible route is 1:16.

Designers are encouraged to consider edge protection and handrails on berms where there may be a drop-off. Remember the maximum slope of this "ground-level accessible route" is 1:16. Berms (sloped surfaces at ground level, designed to ascend or descend in elevation) are sometimes used to provide access to elevated play areas. A berm may be a natural sloped surface that is present in a hilly play area site, or a ground-level route built with slopes.



However, handrails are not required on ground-level accessible routes. This is permitted since the handrails may become a safety hazard in the "use zone."


Accessible Ground Surfaces
Ground surfaces along accessible routes, clear floor or ground spaces, and maneuvering spaces, must comply with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F 1951-99 Standard Specification for Determination of Accessibility to Surface Systems Under and Around Playground Equipment. This standard assesses the accessibility of a surface by measuring the work an individual must exert to propel a wheelchair across the surface. The standard includes tests of effort for both straight-ahead and turning movements, using a force wheel on a rehabilitation wheelchair as the measuring device. To meet the standard, the force required must be less than that which is required to propel the wheelchair up a ramp with a slope of 1:14.

When selecting ground surfaces, operators should request information about compliance with the ASTM F 1951-99 standard.



Accessible surfaces can include impact-attenuating tiles made of recycled rubber and engineered wood fiber that meet the ASTM requirements for accessibility and safety. Safety is not compromised for individuals using the play area where both standards are used.

The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has established safety standards for play areas, including resilient surfaces. For further information or to purchase these standards, contact ASTM, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959, www.astm.org.


Accessible Surfaces Located In The Use Zone
If located within the use zone, accessible ground surfaces must also be impact attenuating and meet ASTM F 1292-99 Standard Specification for Impact Attenuation of Surface Systems Under and Around Playground Equipment. The "use zone" is a ground level area beneath and immediately adjacent to a play structure or piece of equipment that is designated for unrestricted circulation around the equipment. It is predicted that a user would fall and land or exit the equipment on the surface of the use zone.




Accessible and non-accessible surfaces can be combined to provide variety and excitement in the play area.

Ground surfaces must be inspected and maintained regularly and frequently to ensure continued compliance with the ASTM F 1951-99 standard. The frequency of maintenance and inspection of resilient surfacing depends on the amount of use and the type of surfacing installed.


Accessible surfacing can be designed to complement the theme of the play area, while providing full access and visually integrating the surface into the overall design. Individuals of all abilities will enjoy the added benefits of an imaginative design.



Engineered wood fiber surfaces will require frequent maintenance to comply with the ASTM F 1951-99 standard because of surface displacement due to user activity or other factors. Designers and operators are likely to choose materials that best serve the needs of each play area. The type of material selected will affect the frequency and cost of maintenance.

At the time of this publication, rubber surfacing and some engineered wood fiber products meet the ASTM F 1951-99 standard. The fact that a specific product meets the ASTM 1951-99 standard does not necessarily mean that all other similar products will meet the standard. Operators interested in selecting surfaces to comply with the play area guidelines should consult individual product manufacturers to determine compliance with ASTM F 1951-99.



Elevated Accessible Routes
An elevated accessible route is the path used for connecting elevated play components. Elevated accessible routes must connect the entry and exit points of at least 50 percent of the elevated play components provided in the play area. Two common methods for providing access to elevated play components are ramps and transfer systems. Ramps are the preferred method since not all children who use wheelchairs or other mobility devices may be able to use - or may choose not to use - transfer systems.

A typical elevated accessible route might include the following:

36-inch (915 mm) clear width
32-inch (815 mm) narrowed width permitted for 24-inch (610 mm) length to accommodate features in the composite structure
12-inch (305 mm) rise maximum per ramp run
Top of handrail gripping surfaces shall be 20 inches (510 mm) minimum to 28 inches (710 mm) maximum above the ramp surface

When Ramps Are Required
Ramps are required on composite structures with 20 or more elevated play components and must connect to at least 25 percent of the elevated play components. Ramps allow individuals who use wheelchairs and mobility devices to access elevated play components in composite play structures without transferring.




This play area has more than 20 play components and provides ramp access to elevated play components. The ramp system, consisting of ramp runs and landings, must connect at least 25 percent of the elevated play components. The balance of the elevated play components required to be on an accessible route may be connected by the ramp system, or by a transfer system.

Rise of a ramp is the amount of vertical distance the inclined or slanted surface ascends or descends. A ramp run is a length of a continuous sloped surface that is ascending or descending. For example, to reach a 12-inch high deck or platform, a designer could use a 12-foot ramp with the maximum 1:12 slope, or a 14-foot ramp with a less-steep 1:14 slope.

Platform lifts, also known as "wheelchair lifts," may be considered for providing access to elevated play components when appropriate. Where applicable, platform lifts complying with ADAAG section 4.11 and applicable state and local codes are permitted as a part of an accessible route. Because lifts must be independently operable, owners and operators should carefully consider the appropriateness of their use in unsupervised settings.


Ramps
Ramps serve as a continuation of the accessible route from the ground allowing individuals who use mobility
devices to access elevated components. For each elevated ramp run:

12-inch (305 mm) maximum rise

1:12 maximum slope

36-inch (915 mm) minimum clear width



Landings
Landings are the level surfaces at the top and bottom of each ramp run.

Must be as wide as the ramp they connect to

A minimum length of 60 inches (1525 mm)

If ramps change direction, the minimum landing size must be 60 inches (1525 mm) wide to accommodate a turn

Maneuvering Space Where Ramps are Provided
At least one maneuvering space must be provided on the same level as the play component. The space must have a slope no steeper than 1:48 in all directions. ADAAG Section 4.8 addresses additional requirements for ramps and landings including edge protection, cross slope, surfaces, and outdoor conditions.


Handrails
Handrails are required on both sides of ramps connecting elevated play components. Handrails must be:

0.95 (24.1 mm) to 1.55 inches (39.4 mm) diameter or width, or equivalent gripping surface

20 (510 mm) to 28 inches (710 mm) maximum above the ramp surface, measured to the top of the handrail surface

Handrails are required to comply with ADAAG 4.8.5. However, extensions on handrails in the play area are not required. This is to prevent children running into protruding rails in the play area.



When Transfer Systems Are Used

A transfer system provides access to elevated play components within a composite system by connecting different levels with transfer platforms and steps. A transfer system provides access to elevated play components without the use of a wheelchair or mobility devices. At least 50 percent of the elevated play components can be connected by a transfer system in play areas with fewer than 20 elevated components. In play areas with 20 or more elevated play components, transfer systems may be used to connect up to 25 percent of the elevated play components and the rest of the elevated play components required to be on an accessible route must be connected by a ramp.

A transfer system typically consists of a transfer platform, transfer steps, and transfer supports.

Where a transfer system is provided, such a combination of transfer platforms and transfer steps provides a continuous accessible route to elevated play components. A transfer system provides individuals the space necessary to physically transfer up or down in a composite play structure. Where provided, a 24-inch (610 mm) minimum width is necessary for individuals moving around a structure.

Consider the distance someone must travel to reach play components accessed by transfer systems. When a transfer system is placed directly next to a slide, for example, access to the elevated play component must be carefully designed to minimize the distance someone must transfer to reach it.

Playful features can be part of the transfer system (right), providing interactive experiences from both an elevated or ground level approach.


Transfer Platforms
A transfer platform is a platform or landing that an individual who uses a wheelchair or mobility device can use to lift or transfer onto the play structure and leave the wheelchair or mobility device behind at ground level.

11 inches (280 mm) to 18 inches (455 mm) height of top surface

Minimum 24 inches (610 mm) wide

Minimum 14 inches (355 mm) deep

Unobstructed side

Adding a transfer step that leads to the ground's surface increases access for children exiting components at the ground level.

Clear floor or ground space - used for parking wheelchair or mobility devices (commonly called "wheelchair parking") - is required at the transfer platform. The 48-inch long side (1220 mm) of the "wheelchair parking" space must be parallel to the 24-inch (610 mm) side of the transfer platform.



Transfer Steps
Transfer steps are level surfaces in a composite structure that can be used for transferring from different levels to access play components.

Minimum 24 inches (610 mm) wide

Minimum 14 inches (355 mm) deep

8 inches (205 mm) maximum height

Transfer steps in a play area are not required to satisfy the general ADAAG stair requirements. Maneuvering space and clear space is not required on elevated structures or at elevated play components reached by a transfer system.

Play areas intended for smaller children should provide steps at smaller height increments. This will accommodate smaller sized children who must lift or "bump" up each step.



Transfer Supports

A means of support is required when transferring into the entry or seat of a play component. Transfer supports assist individuals with transferring and general mobility. They include handrails, handgrips, or custom designed handholds. Transfer supports must be provided on transfer platforms and transfer steps at each level where transferring is the intended method of access.




Aesthetically pleasing cutout shapes and other design enhancements can provide hand supports for transferring. Materials in a variety of different shapes and sizes are used to manufacture transfer supports including metal, plastic, and rope.


Consideration must be given to the distance between the transfer system and the elevated play components it is intended to facilitate. Designers should minimize the distance between the points where a child transfers from a wheelchair or mobility device and the elevated play destination.

This transfer system provides access to exciting elevated play experiences like sliding while minimizing the distance individuals must traverse.













Connected Elevated Components

When transfer systems are used, an elevated play component may connect to other elevated play components, providing an innovative, accessible route.

Consideration should be given to how a play component is utilized when it is selected to connect to other elevated play events. When a transfer system is provided, children move through a play component (such as a crawling tube) using their own strength without a mobility device. Providing variety and excitement through elevated play spaces benefits all children. Tunnels and tubes make "getting there" an activity in itself.

Elevated play components that are connected to other play components count toward fulfilling the requirement for the number of elevated components on an accessible route where transfer systems are used.



back next