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26 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
IMPORTANT WORDS
PRECISION
ACCURACY
ERROR
INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF UNITS
TOOLS
PICTORIAL REPRESENTATONS OF INFORMATION
desc 1
the teach is able to understand teh use of all tools ad technologies for science instruction
desc 2
teach understands how to take measuremts correctly and understands errors inherent in measurements
desc 3
teach U can colect and display data in a variety of ways
desc 4
teach can use te International system of units and convert between measuremtns
tools-4 important points
anybody can be a scientist as long as they want to learn and ask questions
Professional scientists can only make comments on what their senses can tell them about the world, but often time human senses are limited
science use tools to aid them in teir research
Basic scienc tools you should know-graduated cylinder-measured with volume
A graduated cylinder or measuring cylinder is a piece of laboratory glassware used to accurately measure out volumes of chemicals for use in reactions. They are generally more accurate and precise for this purpose than flasks. Often, the largest graduated cylinders are made of polyethylene or other rigid plastic, making them lighter and less fragile than glass, but are less solvent-resistant and more difficult to sterilize. remember to always read the number which the bottem most part of the meniscus is touching, while keeping your eye leve with the menicus
Basic scienc tools you should know-balance or scale
A weighing scale (usually just "scale" in common usage) is a device for measuring the weight of an object. These scales are often used to measure the weight of a person, and are also used in science to obtain the mass of an object, and in many industrial and commercial applications to determine the weight of things ranging from feathers to loaded tractor-trailers. used for weight or to determine mass, there are mechanical, digital, and spring scales
Basic scienc tools you should know-Pipette
there are diffrient versions-The original pipette is made of glass. It is more commonly used in chemistry, with aqueous solutions. There are two types. One type has a large bulb, and is calibrated for a single volume. Typical volumes are 10, 25, and 50 mL. Alternatively, it is straight-walled, and graduated for different volumes such as 5 mL in 0.5 mL increments. The single volume pipette is usually more accurate, with an error of ± 0.1 or 0.2 mL.

The pipette is filled by dipping the tip in the volume to be measured, and drawing up the liquid with a pipette filler past the inscribed mark. The volume is then set by releasing the vacuum using the pipette filler or a damp finger. While moving the pipette to the receiving vessel, care must be taken not to shake the pipette because the column of fluid may
Basic scienc tools you should know-Microscope
A microscope (Greek: μικρόν (micron) = small + σκοπεῖν (skopein) = to look at) is an instrument for viewing objects that are too small to be seen by the naked or unaided eye. The science of investigating small objects using such an instrument is called microscopy. The term microscopic means minute or very small, not visible with the eye unless aided by a microscope. The microscopes used in schools and homes trace their history back almost 400 years.

The first useful microscope was developed in the Netherlands in the early 1600s.[citation needed] There is almost as much confusion about the inventor as about the dates. Three different eyeglass makers have been given credit for the invention: Hans Lippershey (who also developed the first real telescope); Hans Janssen; and his son, Zacharias.

The most common type of microscope—and the first to be invented—is the optical microscope. This is an optical instrument containing one or more lenses that produce an enlarged image of an object placed in the focal plane of the lens(es). There are, however, many other microscope designs.

exp. light micros. and dissecting microsco.
Basic scienc tools you should know-Bunsen burner
The device safely burns a continuous stream of a flammable gas such as natural gas (which is principally methane) or a liquified petroleum gas such as propane, butane, or a mixture of both. At the time of its invention, the Bunsen burner would have mostly burnt coal gas.

The burner has a weighted base with a connector for a gas line (hose barb) and a vertical tube (barrel) rising from it. The hose barb is connected to a gas nozzle on the lab bench with rubber tubing. Most lab benches are equipped with multiple gas nozzles connected to a central gas source, as well as vacuum, nitrogen, and steam nozzles. The gas then flows up through the base through a small hole at the bottom of the barrel and is directed upward. There are open slots in the side of the tube bottom to admit air into the stream via the Venturi effect, and the gas burns at the top of the tube once ignited by a flame or spark. The most common methods of lighting the burner are using a match or a spark lighter.

The amount of air (or rather oxygen) mixed with the gas stream affects the completeness of the combustion reaction. Less air yields an incomplete and thus cooler reaction, while a gas stream well mixed with air provides oxygen in an equimolar amount and thus a complete and hotter reaction. The air flow can be controlled by opening or closing the slot openings at the base of the barrel, similar in function to a car's carburetor.

If the collar at the bottom of the tube is adjusted so more air can mix with the gas before combustion, the flame will burn hotter, appearing blue as a result. If the holes are closed, the gas will only mix with ambient air at the point of combustion, that is, only after it has exited the tube at the top. This reduced mixing produces an incomplete reaction, producing a cooler but brighter yellow which is often called the "safety flame". The yellow flame is luminous due to small soot particles in the flame which are heated to incandescence. When the burner is regulated to produce a hot, blue flame it can be nearly invisible against some backgrounds. Increasing the amount of fuel gas flow through the tube by opening the needle valve will of course increase the size of the flame. However, unless the airflow is adjusted as well, the flame temperature will decrease because an increased amount of gas is now mixed with the same amount of air, starving the flame of oxygen.
Basic scienc tools you should know-test tubes
da
Basic scienc tools you should know-rulers
da
Basic scienc etools you should know-ot blates
used to heat objects
Basic scienc tools you should know-Beakers and Flasks
used to contain liquids-all of the beakers and flasks that you need for a homeschool lab experiment or chemistry science project. All of our glass beakers and flasks are made of high-quality borosilicate glass and can be heated over an open flame
Basic scienc tools you should know-computers
compters
Basic scienc tools you should know-disecting tools
We understand the needs of science students and educators. We have designed a full line of dissecting instruments for studies in anatomy, zoology, botany and biology. DR Instruments is a direct source for dissecting instruments and dissecting tools ( dissecting kit items, dissecting scissors, forceps, scalpel blades, dissecting probes, and more instruments ) for classroom use.
Precision
ability to produce the same value or result-where you would use a measuring device
Accuracy=
A maeasue of how close a measured value is to the true value
bull's eye analogy
How close you can get to the mark or true value. The analogy used here to explain the difference between accuracy and precision is the target comparison. In this analogy, repeated measurements are compared to arrows that are fired at a target. Accuracy describes the closeness of arrows to the bullseye at the target center. Arrows that strike closer to the bullseye are considered more accurate. The closer a system's measurements to the accepted value, the more accurate the system is considered to be.

To continue the analogy, if a large number of arrows are fired, precision would be the size of the arrow cluster. (When only one arrow is fired, precision is the size of the cluster one would expect if this were repeated many times under the same conditions.) When all arrows are grouped tightly together, the cluster is considered precise since they all struck close to the same spot, if not necessarily near the bullseye. The measurements are precise, though not necessarily accurate.
Further example, if a measuring rod is supposed to be ten yards long but is only 9 yards, 35 inches measurements can be precise but inaccurate. The measuring rod will give consistently similar results but the results will be consistently wrong.

However, it is not possible to reliably achieve accuracy in individual measurements without precision — if the arrows are not grouped close to one another, they cannot all be close to the bullseye. (Their average position might be an accurate estimation of the bullseye, but the individual arrows are inaccurate.) See also Circular error probable for application of precision to the science of ballistics.
communication of results
science is not an introverted disciplne, scientist investigate and inform to communicate to mankind in order to apply new scientific knowledge and technology
chart
REPESENTS PICTORIALY
table
ORG. NUMBERS AND INFO INTO TABLES AND ROWS
graph
A TYPE OF CHART WHICH HAS AN X AND Y AXIS USED TO REPRESENT THE REALATIONSHIP BETWEEN VARIABLES, THERE ARE DIFFREINT GRAPHS, SUCH AS LINE GRAPHS AND BAR GRAPHS
diagram
A PICTORIAL REPRESENTATION
SUCH AS DRAWING
INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM OF MEASUREMENTS
The metric system is a decimalised system of measurement. It exists in several variations, with different choices of base units, though the choice of base units does not affect its day-to-day use. Over the last two centuries, different variants have been considered the metric system. Since the 1960s the International System of Units (SI) ("Système International d'Unités" in French, hence "SI") has been the internationally recognised standard metric system. Metric units are widely used around the world for personal, commercial and scientific purposes. A standard set of prefixes in multiples of 10 may be used to derive larger and smaller units. However, the prefixes for multiples of 1000 are the most commonly used.

LENGTH=METERS
TIME=SECONDS
MASS=GRAMS
ELECTRIC=AMPHERES
THERMYDYNAMIC TEM IN KELVIN
AMOUNT OF SUBSTANCE IN MOLES
LUMINOUS INTENSITY IS MEASURED IN CANDELS
ELECTIRCAL CURRENT-SPHERES