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36 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
alliteration
: the repetition of the first letter in a group of adjacent or loosely connected words
allusion
a reference, direct or indirect, to something in previous literature, music, arts, or history
analogy
: the comparison between two things or circumstances based on similar structure or properties
antagonist
any force in a story that is in conflict with the protagonist; may be a person, an aspect of the physical or social environment, or a destructive element in the protagonist’s own nature
atmosphere
details of the setting which create a mood or a feeling
blank verse
a verse that doesn’t rhyme (in the form of iambic pentameter)
dynamic character
a character who during the course of a story undergoes a permanent change in some aspect of character
flat character
a character who can be summed up in one or two traits
foil character
: a minor character whose situation or actions parallel those of a major character, and thus by contrast sets off or illuminates the major character
round character
: a character whose personality is complex and many-sided
static character
a character who is the same sort of person at the end of the story as at the beginning
Direct characterization
the author tells us directly what a character is like, or has someone else in the story do so
Indirect characterization
the author shows us a character in action, compelling us to infer what the character is like from what is said or done by the character
climax
: the moment of greatest emotional intensity and the moment at which you can begin to see the story’s outcome
conflict
a clash of actions, desires, ideas, or goals in the plot of a story; conflict may exist between the main character and some other person or persons; between the main character and some external force – physical nature, society, or “fate;” or between the main character and some destructive element in his or her own nature
character
any of the persons involved in a story
characterization
: the author’s method of presenting a character
conflict
: a clash of actions, desires, ideas, or goals in the plot of a story; conflict may exist between the main character and some other person or persons; between the main character and some external force – physical nature, society, or “fate;” or between the main character and some destructive element in his or her own nature
foreshadowing
clues or hints about what is to come in the story
hyperbole
exaggerated statements or claims not to be taken literally
imabic pentameter
five feet; each foot contains one unstressed and stressed syllable respectively
imagery
: visually descriptive or figurative language
interior monologue
the representation of a character’s inner thoughts, impressions, and memories as if “overheard” by the reader, sometimes rendered in the style of “stream of consciousness”
irony
a situation, or use of language, involving some kind of incongruity or discrepancy
o Dramatic irony: an incongruity or discrepancy between what a character says or thinks and what the reader knows to be true (or between what a character perceives and what the author intends for the reader to perceive)
o Verbal irony: a figure of speech in which what is said is the opposite of what is meant
o Situational irony: a situation in which there is an incongruity between appearance and reality, or between expectation and fulfillment, or between the actual situation and what would seem appropriate
mood
overall feeling
tone
the author's attitude toward the poem
metaphor
a comparison between two unlike things
onomatopia
words that sound like what they mean; phonetic spelling of sounds
oxymoron
a figure of speech which combines two usually contradictory terms in a compressed paradox
paradox
a statement or situation containing apparently contradictory or incompatible elements, which in another sense or context may be true
plot
sequence of events or incidents in a story
senses
the body’s mechanism for experiencing phenomena (hearing, sight, smell, taste, touch, internal, movement or tension in the muscles)
setting
the context of time and place in which the action of a story occurs
simile
a comparison between two unlike things using “like” or “as”
symbol
something that means more than it is; an object, person, or situation that in addition to its literal meaning suggests other meaning as well
theme
the central idea or unifying generalization implied or stated by a literary work; the author’s comment on life, some “universal truth” about human experience